Friday, November 15, 2013

Are Runners Full Of Themselves?

Unless you’ve been out running and have a life, you might have read this article from the Wall Street Journal entitled, “Okay, You’re a Runner. Get Over It.”

You don’t have to go read it - I will sum it up for you in a few basic points:

  • Runners put 13.1 and 26.2 stickers on their cars to show off
  • Runners run to show off
  • Running is growing in popularity
  • Runners post their accomplishments via social media to show off
  • Runners wear clothes/gear related to running to show off

Common theme = runners like to show off. So very deep and insightful, no?

I took a break from showing off to write the author a little letter.

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What are your thoughts? Are we just an over-indulgent bunch of braggarts? 

Do you have a sticker on your car? Do you post workouts on social media? I don’t do either, but I do have a blog where I brag plenty.

SUAR

141 comments:

  1. Yes, I have a "sticker" (magnet) - one that says RUN, another 13.1, and I will put on the 26.2 after I do my next marathon and am feeling back to being a marathoner. I also have a running-related personalized license plate (which I got right before I got injured in August!).

    I post workouts on social media, and I'm thinking of starting a blog.

    I don't think the guy's writing is worth all the attention it's getting. I read it, thought "eh" and moved on. I didn't take it personally, I guess, figuring he was just trying to get eyeballs or a rise out of people - and it worked! Love the running community responding, but not sure he or his writing is worth our time. I agree that he may be jealous, insecure, unhappy, etc. (or maybe he just likes to rant and we were up next, or maybe while driving he nearly hit a runner who wasn't wearing much reflective gear while running at night and decided to take it out on us all...who knows?)

    I'd rather encourage folks who are more positive to get into running, and hear about everyone's training, racing and future plans than spend any more time on him.

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  2. You nailed it! Thanks for sticking up for us.

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  3. Well said, Beth. I do have a 26.2 sticker on my car and I love it not so much because it signals the accomplishment, but because my husband surprised me by putting a 13.1 sticker on my car *during* my first half marathon so it would be waiting for me when I was done, and replaced it with a 26.2 when I did my first full.

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  4. You told us readers not to read the article. Than you ask our opinion on the article. I had to put the extra effort of scrolling all the way back to the top for the link. You are evil. haha.

    Anyways, the article really just seemed like an article to stir up emotions and reactions. I know I don't run to show off, at least not till I get sexy and ripped. It is just something I enjoy doing and want to do more of.

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    1. Haha! True, I guess what I meant was - the contents of the article as summarized...

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  5. Your response is the best one so far!!

    p.s. the guy is a douche canoe.

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  6. Love it, especially the last sentence.

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  7. yep and triathletes are much worse i fear.

    Actually running (elite running) has taken a turn for the worse in the U.S. and fewer actual runners are participating as we can't "keep up" with Ethiopians/Kenyans/etc. The 70s and early 80s showed more people actually running. Now I see 5:30 marathoners who say they ran a marathon. They didn't and they aren't runners. So it all boils down to...define "runner".

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    1. I am guessing you do not have many friends.

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    2. Not from this blog, at least ;)

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    3. Jerk. I did a marathon in over 5:30....I DID run it and I AM a runner. Being slow doesn't mean I accomplished less. Good thing I don't let people like you steal my joy.

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    4. I state facts and get called names. interesting.

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    5. Put a sticker on your car that says 281.2- really impress the hell out of people if that's what you are going for.

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    6. Btw, Insinuating slower runners are not runners is indeed not a fact.

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    7. Go sit on your couch and let us run laps around you. "Thelongrun".

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    8. Wow, maybe you could post your amazing times so we slower non-runners can dream of what it is like to be a real runner.

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    9. I hope like hell she's not a coach or trainer...

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    10. I think it's funny "Thelongrun" is as good as anonymous....

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    11. I find it ironic that Mr, Crankypants here is using the name of one of the most motivational books for running. The Long Run, by Matt Long, you should read that book sometime. Maybe you'd learn to appreciate one's 5:30 marathon when you run it after barely making it alive.

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    12. I have run 2 marathons in over 5:30. And yes, I am a runner. No one can take that away from me..

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    13. How dare you say that someone who completed a marathon in over 5:30 say they didn't run it and aren't runners? THEY COMPLETED A MARATHON! What is WRONG with you! I bet you don't even get off the couch! What about that muscular distrophy guy who walked the New York marathon in 16 hours... what, he isn't a runner? Get over yourself. I bet you haven't ever crossed a finish line. Jerk. If people walk/run, jog, or run, they ARE RUNNERS! I don't care if WE run 3 blocks or 3 hours!

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    14. Don't let thelongrun get to you... he is just a sad overweight troll that is sitting on his couch eating chips, jealous that he can't even walk a mile. And saying that someone who completed a marathon is not a runner... only a jealous idiot would say that is a "fact". LOL gotta laugh at that. Go eat another bag of chips, troll.

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    16. Maybe some day I will fill you in on my accomplishments-
      yes I happen to be a person who runs. Don't need to and never have had the need for a label such as "runner" or "triathlete". I have been a coach though but had my students call me by my name. I posed the question about who should we call a "runner" and you are coming up with your own insinuations of who I am and what I do. You aren't even close-let's keep it that way.

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    17. I'm new at running, and it is running, because my feet lift off the ground at a speed faster than walking. But I am not fast. It's people like you that make me second guess myself and make me wary of signing up for races or running groups for fear of being judged for my slow pace. Do me a favor though- don't try and define me on whether or not I fit your running standards, and I will try my best to try and not define you as a jerk, deal?

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    18. Merriam-Webster: Runner - n. 1.a: one that runs: RACER.
      Run - v. 1.a: to go faster than a walk; specif: to go steadily by springing steps so that both feet leave the ground for an instant in each step.

      Clear enough?

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    19. I'm glad you weren't my son's cross country coach. At his high school, every single student who comes out for the team, makes the team. The kids learn many lessons from learning how to run properly to the "pack mentality" to learning how to love running. They learn to be physically fit.

      And each student that goes to practice is labelled a "runner" even the ones that cross the finish line last.

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    20. I run for me and was motivated to run by my brother. Nothing bad is going to come of me going out and running at a slow place. I do not think that we run for other people's opinions, we are proud of what we do and that is okay. I suppose that running brings joy or some type of positive vibe to "thelongrun" as it does everyone else. That is really all we can hope for. I believe that 26.2 or 3.1, 140.6 or 70.3 means something a little different for everyone. It all looks a little different but is meaningful when the finish line is crossed.

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    21. I guess trail runners aren't runners, most of those marathons go past 5:30

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  8. Dear Lord, I hope you bought that damn IM sticker and flaunt it proudly!

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    1. Wonder what the author thinks of tattoos?

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  9. did you see the response from mark remy at runner's world? this is hysterical: http://www.runnersworld.com/fun/the-wsjs-get-over-it-column-translated?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-RunnersWorld-_-Content-Blog-_-WSJRemyResponse

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    1. Hahaha!! I had not read that...hysterical and spot on.

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  10. I've never commented on your site before (I know, I owe you a big CONGRATS on your IMFL victory!!!!), but I LOVE this letter. You are such a stud and preach the truth! Dude is just putting down because he has low self-esteem. You hit the nail on the head. I hope this gets published!!!

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  11. As always....I love your take on things! I am running for all of the reasons you list!! So thank you!!

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  12. You nailed the response! Way to go Beth. I haven't read the piece, because I try to avoid the sarcastic snark that passes for writing these days ... so your summary was just perfect.

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  13. Good for you!!! I guess I contributed to this showing off...I finished my first half in Sept and bought the sticker before I finished the race and slapped that sucker on there as soon as I got to the car....but I was pretty dang proud of myself...I've lost 36lbs since starting to run and I still have 100lbs to lose so my running isn't a pretty site by any means. My goal in life is to get as many more people out there that I can so they can "show off" too...cuz if I can "show off" at 100lbs overweight..then anyone can!!!

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    1. So proud of you Gwen! I too am overweight, by about 100 lbs and I am running my first half in the spring. So lets show off, because we have earned our accomplishments! congrats on your 36 lbs and all of your runs!!!!!! :) Keep up the good work!

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  14. I forget who said it. "It ain't bragging if you done it." Inelegant, but true. One of my little rules in life is that we have to celebrate our own accomplishments because nobody else is likely to celebrate them. For some people that means walking across a room by themselves. For others it's a sub-freaking 13 hour Ironman! Both, and everything in between are worthy of celebration. There is no harm in it, unless you are doing it to be cruel to someone.
    I do not have the stickers on my car, though there is a 70.3 on the fridge from somewhere. No stickers or ink on the body.

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  15. This entire article seemed so odd to me. I couldn't tell if it was fueled by jealousy or just general lack of understanding on behalf of the author (RE: what it takes to be fit). While I'll admit some people do gloat about their running achievements, I don't know how bragging about running is any different than, say... people bragging about their kids, driving flashy sports cars, gushing about exotic vacations, pushing their various personal beliefs on someone else... the list goes on and on.

    I tried to read this article and understand the writer's perspective, and all I could think of was the following.

    A few years ago I weighed 240 pounds. Now, I don't - and have held a steady weight for the last two years. I have also changed jobs and started working with a group of people who never knew me when I was heavier. (You can read my blog about my weight loss if you’re curious – I won’t go on about that here).

    Anyhow, in changing jobs, I thought nothing of moving my “bib wall” from my old cube into my new cube. (I have kept all my bibs over the years and just keep tiling them one after the other on my cube wall). Looking at the bibs every morning reminds me that I ran my first 5K at 215 pounds about 4 years ago, and seeing the 5K bibs progress into duathlons and half marathons as they line up in chronological order just makes me happy.

    After settling into my cube, I noticed my new coworkers would see my bib wall and look at me in a similar way as this article. It didn’t occur to me that the bibs would come off as show boating, since at my previous employer, people had seen the change I made over the years and viewed my bib wall in a much different light. However, slowly as I started “breaking in” the surroundings at the new job, something would come up in conversation organically about how I used to be so much heavier... and it's like a switch clicked in people’s head the second they would hear me say “I used to be fat”. The meaning of my wall changed to them in that instant. The judging changed into understanding.

    I’m realizing this comment is turning into a ramble… so I guess I should wrap up. My point is, I decided that the author of the article just needs to grow up a little and move beyond judging a book by its cover… or sticker… or runner tee… and ask: “Why do YOU run?”

    What he could learn about the person who’s “offending” him might surprise him.

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    1. Excellent point. We all have our reasons and giving someone the benefit of the doubt and getting to know them goes along way. Congrats on the major, major weight loss!

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    2. I really think he meant it to be humorous.

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  16. You are brilliant. HE is an asshole. The end.

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  17. No car sticker, but I definitely blog about races and sometimes post workouts on social media. I'm proud of going from fat, out-of-shape girl to slightly overweight, runner girl :-)

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    1. Keep up the good work!!! :)

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  18. I have a 13.1 sticker on my car (just earned the right to have it there last weekend)! I didn't put it up to brag to other people. I put it up because I am proud of my accomplishment, but also because I want to give a little wink-wink, nudge-nudge to other runners. That magnet on my car says, "hey, we're both driving right now, but we'd rather be running, right? ;-)"

    It's not unlike having a "Vote for XYZ" on your car which says that you're (probably) a democrat or republican (based on who you want to vote for). A running magnet is a way of saying hola to the group of people you identify with on the road.

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  19. Okay. Where did you get that leopard skin print running skirt? That's really the important question here.

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    1. Running Skirts...not sure if they still have it...got it about 3.5 years ago! Still my favorite even though it is starting to smell.

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    2. Jen - if Running Skirts is out of stock and you're not particular about what you wear when you run, I've purchased some wicking spandex skirts on Etsy that I just throw over the top of my run capris/shorts, and they've been a ton of fun. Try contacting Micksmakings and see if she's got any cheetah fabric on hand (or ask her if she'd order some for you). I think her skirts are like $20-30.

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    3. Here's an example of a skirt she made me in the past based on a custom request for outer space fabric: https://www.etsy.com/transaction/97405808?

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  20. Well said and Amen! Thank you for writing this!

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  21. What an arrogant person (okay, I was going to say asshole). We should celebrate all the people that run for whatever reason fuels their passion.

    Everyone has a passion and should be celebrated for it.

    He needs a "stick-ectomy."

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  22. This guy is truly an idiot. Waiting anxiously for the (inevitable) part II about road cyclists... and maybe part III about going to national parks and being bothered by pesky hikers?

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  23. Best response I've seen on that YET! Well done, Beth!

    Sarah
    www.thinfluenced.com

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  24. I totally have a 26.2 sticker. Check out my post concerning the WSJ article.

    http://becauseitcalmsmynerves.wordpress.com/

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  25. I have a 26.2 magnet on the back of my car-I damned well earned it so I get to do what I want-like stick it on my car bumper! Plus, it helps me identify my car at work. There are 2 other BLACK PASSAT TDIs that park in the same small parking lot as I do. Without the magnet, I would be trying to get into the wrong car. Oh wait, I have tried to get into the wrong car with the magnet...whatever! Like you said, enough negativity in the world. Is the author really upset over the stickers? What about the people who have stick families all over the back of the mini van windows! What an outrage! I don't care if you have 2 kids and 5 cats! :) Nice blog post :)

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  26. I don't care what he thinks or any body else thinks about my magnet. Sometimes, I need the reminder that I did it.

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  27. This struck close to home, and you nailed the response. I read social media accounts every day about people unhappy with their job, their marriage, they're stressed, they're unhealthy, they rage and wail about politics, religion, the neighbors lawn...

    I LOVE reading about how you (among others) are training. I LOVE reading how somebody has set a new PR. I LOVE seeing somebody wearing a jersey or hat or shirt from a race I've done, or a race I want to do. It builds camaraderie, and one runner/rider/racer always likes to trade war stories with another. I'm proud of the 26.2 on my window, and I'm looking forward to putting the 70.3 on their as well.

    Thanks for speaking for all of us.

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  28. Love it and all very well said!

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  29. I'm sporting a >26.2 sticker on my car AND I have a winged foot tattoo that I got after I ran my first marathon.

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  30. Should've known you would have a good response but also rightly see that he was just starting sh*t to get hits. I have stickers because I'm a pretty new runner, 2.5 yrs. I need less affirmation about my running as time passes, but with new PRs and events, I will tell my running friends at least! As to the ' real runner' vs 'jogger or not a real runner' idea, it's similar to people ( my husband) who say there are 'real bikers' and 'yuppies on credit card Harleys". The old timers just want to keep their little world pure and can't accept change. They can't see that it's a compliment to have people wanting to be like them. 'longrun' needs to develop a sense of gratitude for his abilities and be happy for others who might be slower but still doing their best.

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  31. Totally bitchin' response. Thanks for writing that letter on behalf of all of us.

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  32. Thanks for saving me the time of writing a letter. I do have a 13.1, 26.2 13.wine(for a wine trail half I did), 50K and a SUAR sticker on my car! If someone doesn't like looking at them when driving by my vehicle then look the other way. I could be conceited and have one for all of the eighteen halfs I've ran and the four fulls but that might make me look EXTREMELY conceited.

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  33. I have opted to give Mr Stafko's article the attention it deserves... NONE. It is one man's opinion that is using "sensationalism" as a ploy for media coverage. No different than the "shock jocks" on the radio.. The WS Journal is a dying product grasping for any attention, whether be it positive or negative. By acknowledging this man's opinion, we are giving him and the Journal credibility... His words hold no more value than the ones that I have just written . I implore you to ignore my words too!.. may your vibes be positive, your feet be light, and you run with a smile :)

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  34. lol... I just saw the article today... I love Mark Remy's response to it on Runner's World and I love your letter you wrote to the author!! What a stupid arrogant article! lol What's the point?! I see more vacation bumper stickers than I do running stickers... just sayin... and it doesn't matter what reason someone is running... even if it is just to show off... they are still being active... so kudos to them!

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  35. You are so RIGHT! I started running about three years ago to deal with the stress of my needy mother, substance abusing teenage son and my father's terminal cancer. I tried the group therapy, counseling, etc. everything but the antidepressants most were advising. I knew drugs were not an option for me because of my mother and son's substance abuse. Running made it possible for me to get out of bed and not cry ALL DAY.

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  36. Heck yes I sport my 26.2 on the back of my truck!! I am thinking I should also slap one on for every marathon I have run, eh?

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  37. I have a 26.2 sticker that was given to me after the Blue Ridge Marathon and an ultra sticker that was included in the race packet for a 50k in Asheville, NC and have both of those on my car along with a magnet that says "runs with dogs". I've never once looked at a sticker on someone's car and thought they were bragging. It just made me wonder what races they've completed, or which ones they are training for currently. It made me instantly like that person without ever talking to them. If I pull up next to someone in the parking lot I will strike up conversation. It just seems, at least to me, a way for runners to communicate, sometimes without actually saying anything to the person.

    I do share on social media but luckily with privacy settings I have a "running" group of friends on facebook and usually just share it with those on that list. I really don't think the others care so I don't clog their page up with my running stuff. Why is it such a bad thing to feel accomplished after completing your first half, full, or ultra? It takes weeks, months, some even years of training. We make sacrifices and yes it's a choice, but we do it. If we want a magnet or sticker on the car to express it when I think we've earned that right.

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    1. I totally agree. I haven't put my 26.2 magnet on my car from my first marathon yet, but I will. I love seeing cars with other running stickers. It lets me identify with other people, even if I don't know them. Same with race shirts!

      I also love reading my FB friends' running accomplishments and adventures. I probably would never have thought to run a marathon if I hadn't seen so many of my friends run and be successful. It is especially inspiring to see people I knew in high school who were not athletic take up running. We choose to run even though it isn't our job (most of us, anyway!) and we choose the sacrifice. I only hope that I can continue to make this choice throughout the rest of my life.

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  38. I would strongly recommend just using Google to tranzizzle his article: http://www.gizoogle.net/tranzizzle.php You'll find it much more palatable to read once it sounds like Snoop Dog wrote it :) Your response on the other hand, fabulous!

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  39. Journalists and their fancy publications. Always wanting a byline and a breaking story. Their press badges around their necks and invite-only events... It's like they're bragging or something.

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  40. Yep, even in our small group of a dozen moms we have a former heroin addict, anxiety disorder (me - and it keeps my meds at a minimum), and two other suspected mood disorders for whom running truly is therapy. I do run for my life and that of my kids. Great reply. Glad also that you didn't leave out the part about the dump.

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    1. I also went for my first red faced, oxygen deprived, gasping, painful 1k run right after my last cigarette almost fifteen years ago. Forgot that :)

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  41. Listen, I get that scatological "humor" is your thing, but in this case (and let's be honest, in most cases) it really takes away from your point and just makes you seem vulgar. We get it, you're obsessed with shitting. Good for you! Poop is normal, healthy, etc. But if you're really trying to champion runners, and make the runner's natural inclination toward bragging seem not just okay, but necessary, then leave off the references to taking a dump. It will be more effective, I promise.

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    1. I think most people relate. sorry you don't.

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    2. Everyone poops. There's even a book. Get over it - I LOVE and appreciate SUAR's humor...

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    3. Yes, this "anonymous" must be new here. There is talk of poop in almost every post, so if it offends you, you might not want to return. Just keeping it real.

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    4. I think Anonymous does not understand the importance of taking a dump before a run. I very much appreciate the reminder. That's why some of us need to wake up an hour early and down a coffee so that the holy dump does not prevent us from enjoying the run. It's a ritual, get it?

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  42. I have a sticker on my car because it's something I never thought I would be able to put on it. It was a huge accomplishment for me and I'm proud to sport it. And you're right, I think it's okay to brag on ourselves every once in awhile for something we worked really hard for. Hopefully we have people in our life who are excited for us and not jealous.

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  43. "What you don't get is that most people are running for their lives..." Boy, you took my breath away with this paragraph. Running is an addictive sport for sure, but it's a hell of a lot better than swigging a pint of tequila. I can't tell you how many former addicts I know who run...and are clean and productive citizens bc of their runs, no matter how slow they are.

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  44. Your response is the best I've seen yet. It hit every point I was thinking while I read the article, but summed it all up a lot better!

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  45. Bravo. Just - Bravo.

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  46. I have several car magnets and I trade them out as I see fit, I have 13.1 and 26.2 tervis tumblers, I wear a running chick necklace and have a ton of other running related jewelry, I also pretty much live in running clothes. Where I draw the line is my medals, I only wear them 364 days out of the year, I take a break on Christmas Day. Oh, and Mr. Stafko can suck it!

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  47. *clap clap clap* Thank you for this.

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  48. Thank you. I never ever would have understood it until I ran my first mile. I literally jumped uo and down when I told my husband what I had done. Now hoping for a half next month. I usually tell my friends that I went for walk so as not to sound boastful. But I will buy that sticker next month!! Maybe even a tatoo. This is for me though. My time. Me and my thoughts. Me and God and the road.

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  49. Your letter is priceless. Let us know if you get a reply - which will likely be priceless as well. That guy really needs to get out and ... run.

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  50. OMG. Mr Stafko might be writing about me. I'm up at 5 am, drinking coffee so I can take a dump before my 10 mile run that I'm doing at 6:30 am. Later, I'll be going to bed at 9 pm on a Saturday night because I'm tired from my early am run. Show off? What a joke! There are many more things I can think of doing today that would constitute Showing Off other than this. What an idiot. He probably has not ever run or walked 5 miles. And, I'm embarrassed to say he lives in Freeburg Illinois which is within 10 miles of my house. Yeay, so proud. Glad you wrote a letter. Saves me the trouble, since I'll busy bragging about my run today.

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  51. I placed a 13.1 sticker on my car the day I completed my first half! So yes, I do brag. And I have a SUAR sticker on my car. ;)

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  52. I really, really hope you sent him that letter

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  53. I have a 26.2 sticker on my car and I am damn proud of it. Running helped me loose 60 pounds and become a healthier, happier person. I love your letter and I very much hope you sent it!!

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  54. I've written about the stickers before.....I see many cars with 5k, 10k, 13.1, 26.2, 70.3 all over them...isn't it understood if you did 26.2 that you can cover 13.1?? Do you need both a 70.3 AND a 140.6?? I think 1 is enough....I don't put "running" stickers on my car, but I slapped a 140.6 on there after my Ironman....Bagging?? You bet! Let Mr. Stafko train for any of these, because it's not the race.....THATS the easy part!

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  55. I'm proud of my sticker. I'm proud of what I have accomplished, especially because I was told I would never run again.

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  56. I was mortified when I first started reading your blog post because I just yesterday posted photos on facebook of my first marathon. "OMG was I tacky?" But no, I was happy and proud and wanted to share a little of the experience with my friends that have supported me along the way. If we can't get a little excited about our running accomplishments, how are we going to drag ourselves out of bed for those early morning rainy runs in the dark?

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  57. It's definitely okay to be proud of what you accomplish especially if only so many take the time, discipline, and effort to train, eat right, and push themselves. I am continuously inspired by other runners and I love hearing all the stories which started them on their running journey. The running community is so supportive; I am proud to be part of a proud group of people who set goals, accomplish them, and support others in accomplishing their goals. Other people who don't get it, don't get it. They have a right to their opinions. -Jessica L

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  58. Bravo! Well Said (your letter not his story)

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  59. Perfect response Beth! Not only do I have a 26.2 sticker on my car, I have a PINK 26.2 sticker on my car. Yesterday, I ran 18 miles and saw a total of 5 people. Three of them were runners. As we passed, we all did the, "Hey, glad to see you out here" wave and smile. I have no idea if they were running 20 miles or two. It didn't matter. We bonded in that fleeting moment - no self-promoting bragging parades of one anywhere in sight.

    All of that aside, what makes me happier then any running accomplishment is the fact that my daughters WANT to run our local Turkey Trot 5K and Jingle Bell 5K in the next few weeks! They are racking up miles for their Progressive Marathon. (Kids run a few miles at a time up to 25 miles and finish their 1.2 at the First Light Marathon in Mobile, AL in mid-January.) I am over the moon that they enjoy running with Mommy. And, they are beginning a sport they can do for the rest of their lives. For that, I will plaster stickers over every surface of my car!!!

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  60. My favorite point in his article is where he kvetches that there are WHOLE.STORES. dedicated to just running clothes and shoes. Because in this world, no such thing exists for other items; such as, stores that only sell electronics, stores that only sell phones, stores that only sell tobacco, stores that only sell alcohol, stores that only sell sexy items AND SO ON. They're called speciality stores. What an asshat.

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  61. I have a 13.1 sticker (magnet) on my car and a license plate holder that says "my other car is a pair or running shoes". I earned that magnet through rain, freezing temperatures sweat and a lot of hard work. But I don't run to put magnets on my car or wear a shirt from a race I've completed, I run because running saved (and continues to) my life. I run for my family and friends that have lost their battles with cancer, and those who are currently fighting it. From the words of Melissa Etheridge's song: "I run for hope, I run to feel, I run for the truth, For all that is real, I run for your mother your sister your wife, I run for you and me my friend, I run for life..."

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    1. P.S. Congratulations on your Ironman - do they make car condom that displays this accomplishment?

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  62. You nailed it Beth! Social media offers runners (as well as other athletes) accountability and a support network!

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  63. I no longer have distance stickers on my car but do have one for the training program I support and a triathlon sticker a friend gave me to celebrate my 70.3. I love seeing other's stickers - I feel an immediate connection when I see those stickers. I don't see it as bragging, I see it as information about the person. And when I see one, I will buy the 0.0 for my husband. He plays tennis and thinks running in a big circle is weird. haha.

    The leopard print skirt in your pic is no longer available (I have the same skirt). They have a grey/white version called Snow Leopard.

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  64. AWESOME response to that dummies article!

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  65. I have the magnets on my car. And yes, I'm totally bragging.

    However, when I post on social media and on my blog, I'm not. I like to think that I'm inspiring others. I'm a normal person. A mom of young kids and wife with a busy schedule. I also love to run. Bonus: it's healthy for me. (Side note: I also like to drink and I post that on social media too)
    If *I* can get up before the crack of dawn to run a ridiculous distance....if *I* can take my physical and mental health into my own hands and make my life better, ANYONE can.

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  66. Great letter, SUAR. I'm pinning this one.

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  67. I have a 26.2 magnet and I sometimes post running stuff on FB (not so much anymore because I am slower and have less to brag about). I figure my friends might be mildly interested in what I do and if not they can scroll past. Just like I read about their running stuff, or kids' games, or fabulous desserts, or amazing furniture refinishing projects. I don't mind people's car stickers about their interests, even if it's something I disagree with. It would be a boring world if we all kept our enthusiasms to ourselves for fear of offending people.

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  68. AWESOME!!! Wonder if I should send him a pic of my 13.1 running tattoo I just got on my foot.... I wanted to permanently show off!!!

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  69. Thank you for your spot-on response. I just wanted to add, if you do it in this order:
    put on snazzy shirt, run, poop.
    You may be running/walking right at the end, straight through the front door and praying that your son is not on the toilet.

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  70. Nice job Ironwoman. I replaced his stupid link on my blog with the link to your summary. What a douche nugget.

    http://www.bryonman.com/2013/11/really-wow-friends-and-runners-check.html

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  71. So, let me get this straight: He's complaining that the people he SEES running are looking for attention? What about those of us logging hundreds (sadly, not an exaggeration) of miles on the treadmills in our basement? Or on the back country road where the only one who sees me is the herd of cattle and occasional deer? I'm showing off for who, then, exactly? I don't even HAVE a Facebook account ! I do have a 13.1 sticker, though, and if someone finds that offensive (because I'm rubbing it in their face that they haven't done it? Or what?), too bad! I didn't buy it to impress people. Mainly, I put it on my Space Shuttle so I can locate it in the sea of other minivans out there. I also have a Mickey Mouse antenna decoration - I guess I'm showing off that I got to go to Disney? I dunno.

    And the thing about the running stores...I think maybe he just feels left out. Runners require a "specialty" store for some of our gear but any moron can peck out a few lines and get a by-line in the WSJ (obviously).

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  72. This guy makes me sad. I started running 10 years ago to outrun an abusive father, mother, and boyfriend. I was just starting college and felt worthless and unworthy of everything after years of being told I was worthless. Running saved me, running taught me I was capable of anything if I worked hard enough, and loved me when I felt unloveable. I world never have finished college with two BS degrees and a masters in neuroscience if not for running. I do have a 26.2 on my car, from the Boston marathon in 2008, and I may put a 140.6 if and when I finish ironman Louisville in 2014, and as a crossfitter who can clean and jerk a douchebag like this, I dare him to come at me. My story isn't one that's unique, of my friends I've made through running, we all have things we run to control/run away from/to heal from. Thank you Beth, you can speak for this average runner anytime.

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  73. Well said, Beth. No stickers on my car, there are enough of those along the front range. I run to stay out of the funny farm. I completed my first marathon to support kids like mine with high functioning autism. Thinking about their daily struggles keeps me putting one foot in front of the other...and yes, I am one of the slow ones. But I'm not gonba quit just because I'm not fast anymore :)
    *gonna

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  74. Beth, well said!!! When I complete my first half next September I am positively going to display my 13.1 sticker PROUDLY. Yes, I post on social media and text friends my running stats. I was recently diagnose with high cholesterol, 20lbs over weight, a divorced mother of three and the sole caregiver of my adult disable daughter...so HECK YEAH!!! I boast about getting up and running. This is coming from a lady who couldn't run 2 min without stopping and now I can go 4 miles nonstop. I have a reason to be proud of ME!!!!,,,that's just my two cents :)

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  75. I want to sign that letter too! I don't have a sticker but I do post on FB.

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  76. I personally ONLY log in mile after mile dressed in reflective gear and free tech race shirts to get accolades and praise from neighbors and random strangers who happen to be driving by...

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    1. Do you know that I have not ever gotten one "atta girl" while running? I guess I need more reflective gear! ;)

      Seriously - I loved your response. The dude obviously has some issues. Maybe he needs to take a dump and go for a run, too.

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  77. I have a RUN sticker on my car. I intentionally do not have a 26.2 or Tri or 13.1 because that does seem to be distance bias and running is not about the distance. A mile for one person could be a momumental as 26.2 for someone else.
    I don't agree that runners are selfish or braggish. We know what running can do - it can change lives. Because it has changed our lives. Other people find comfort in scrapbooking or knitting, and I admire them for it. But it happens to be running for me.

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  78. I have purposefully not put a 26.2 sticker on because I am afraid people would think I am bragging! So dumb! I look at it as a way to connect with other like minded runners, and when I see a sticker, I don't think they are bragging! We are promoting our passion for our sport. People put team logos all over their car to show their team spirit, I don't see what the difference is. I find it soooo odd that some express such hostility towards active people, but namely runners/cylists. (I'm sure because they are so visible and annoying!) I think it has much more to do with the hostile person than it does us. (clearly).

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  79. I understand that running might be saving someone depending on their situation. But not even getting that deep - it's what I do. It's part of who I am. So, yes, I have 13.1 sticker on my car. Someone else might have those little stick people families, or "I love my boxer" or "Army Veteran". I share some things about running on my facebook along with a ton of pix of my grandchildren : ). My friend has rabbits and goat and post funny pix of them. Another friend post tons of stuff about her kids, another what she cooks, another has strong political views. So what? We're all into different things and part of social media is sharing our interests with our friends and families.

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  80. Great letter. You shoulda worked in that you just did an ironman (!), worth mentioning (any chance you get).

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  81. Are runners show offs? Yes, sometimes.

    Are parents, college graduates, students, show offs? Yes, sometimes.

    I've seen people boast about their children's kindergarten graduation, potty training, etc, and I've seen people students brag about getting their diploma, or being accepted into a college, finishing a test, being an honors student, etc. Often, and yes, even with bumper stickers!

    As for the person who doesn't think someone who takes 5:30 to finish a marathon is a runner, does that mean that someone who graduates school without honors isn't actually a graduate? Does that mean that a student who didn't get one of the highest marks on a test didn't really pass? Is a parent whose child didn't develop a cure for cancer, but was still a good person, not really a parent?

    And you know what? I like show offs, they're inspiring.

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  82. I just started reading and I'm glad I did. You're a good blogger, one of the finest that Ive seen. This blog absolutely has some facts on subject that I just wasn't aware of. Thanks for bringing this things to light.

    www.imarksweb.org

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  83. I love your letter!

    I knew by reading his article that he is not a runner and that is why he he does not understand.

    I post about about my running on Facebook, Instagram and my blog. I post about it for a couple reasons. It keeps me accountable, I'm proud of myself for losing 50 pounds and being ABLE to run a half marathon or just around the block, and I inspire people. I didn't try to inspire people but I have been told that I do and if I can help one person feel less miserable about themselves and their body and to be healthier and live a few more years then YES, yes I will keep posting about my accomplishments!

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  84. Looks so awesome for athletes.I just found this also on

    http://www.apparelnbags.com/champion/index.htm

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  85. I think the piece was meant to be tongue in cheek, slightly provocative, and not really to be taken too seriously. That it has sparked such a heated reaction suggests that there might be just a tiny bit of truth in that piece, as silly as it was. I think runners need to recognize that some who participate in the sport do a lot of navel gazing, which is OK, but being able to poke a little fun at oneself is necessary in this world, as well as taking pride in one's achievements.

    I have no problem with stickers--I have a Run sticker on my car.

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  86. There is a reason why running is such a boring spectators sports. First, it is easy - everyone can run. Secondly, it doesn't require much skills. It used to be quite an individual activity but in recent years, it has become a fad and organising marathons can become a big money making machine. In my country, there is a marathon every other week with tens of thousands of people participating. I have not heard of anyone who participated who did not complete - in short, most participants will complete it any way - which again proves that anyone who put in some effort is going to accomplish it any way. Which means no one is really that impressed. People actually pay money to participate in running events in order to have the bragging rights. Or else, why would you pay money to jostle with thousands of other people? So running marathon has become the biggest fad and the best money making machine in my country. People run not because of the love of running, but because of the "glory". But the ironical part is, these runners did not realise that running a marathon is so passe - and requires no skills whatsoever. Just train and trust any Tom Dick and Harry will get there. So runners stops being so full of yourselves - and going around paying money to get a medal which millions of others do any way is nothing worth bragging about.

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  87. I wrote a little something to him as well.

    Yes Chad Stafko, I wake up at 6:00 am and run around in the dark so that I can get lots and lots of attention. You nailed it.

    Actually, I run because it makes me feel good and it helps me to maintain a healthy weight, especially on those days when I'm on a time crunch and I can't make it to the gym. I race because it helps me to push myself so I don't fall into a running rut. I'd love for him to run a few races, and then come back and tell me that we do it for the attention.

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  88. I like your post a lot! You should write some more on this!Great job coming with such terrific post!


    mocsbar.com

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  89. I'm impressed. You're truly well informed and very intelligent. You wrote something that people could understand and made the subject intriguing for everyone. I'm saving this for future use.


    Kendra
    www.imarksweb.org

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