Thursday, October 24, 2013

I Ran My 1st Half Marathon At 41 Years Old. She Ran Hers at 6.

Yes, I said six years old. As in, first grade - the time when most kids are picking their noses, eating glue and learning to read. The time when their most basic form of exercise is swinging, playing kickball and going down the slide as many times as possible at recess.

That might apply to MOST kids, but not to Keelan Glass. On October 12, Keelan completed her first half marathon in 2:46 (Showdown Half in Fairview, Texas). She officially became the youngest person ever to race that distance. She also raised $2,855 for the Pregnancy Resource Center.

Road runner: Keelan Glass, age 6, became the youngest person in the world to take part in a half-marathon

She is darn cute. And I love her purple Road ID

Her next goal? To run a marathon when she is 10 years old. Her mother did express some concern that that might be too much. The story goes that both of Keelan’s parents are athletic (triathletes) and used to run with Keelan in the jogging stroller. That is until she got sick of the stroller and started running with them. By age 4, she was running 5Ks.

There is no mention in the article if they parents pushed Keelan to do this or if it was all her own idea. The article did mention that the family talked to an orthopedist prior to the race, who gave Keelan the go ahead.

I’m not sure what to think (like it’s any of my business anyway, but we bloggers got to comment on all things running, right?). One part of me admires this girl’s determination and passion at such a young age (assuming it is hers and not her parents’). In the age childhood obesity and inactive kids, one could view her as an inspiration.

On the flip side, there is the argument of doing too much, too young, too soon. Is 13.1 miles excessive for six year old joints, muscles, bones and growth plates? I have no idea.  Do kids keep having to do more and more all the time?

What’s next? TIM (Toddler Ironman)?

Are you ever TOO young to run a half marathon? Why or why not?

SUAR

87 comments:

  1. I read an article today where a pediatrician expressed some concern that running these distances at her age could be too much for her bones, growth plates and other anatomy-ish stuff.

    I tend to agree. I'm all for kids running, but this seems crazy. I'm surprised the RD let her run at that age.

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    1. Hi, I am Russell Olsen, a 21-year-old running fanatic. I ran my first half-marathon at the age of 10. I am now almost 6'2'', although I did get my growth spurt a little late as I was between 5'7'' and 5'8'' on my 14th birthday. I am now wondering if I should run a marathon. I think I am old enough now. My advice is that it depends on the kid. I do think I burned out a little bit in 9th and 10th grade, due to growing pains. I ran a 20:13.0 5K at the age of 11, but a 19:26 in cross country sophomore year.

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  2. I don't have children but if I did I doubt I would allow them to run long distances at such a young age. Most races I participate in have a minimum age requirement. Hopefully her pediatrician cleared her to do this. You're right, she's a real cutie!

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  3. I've watched this blow up over at runners world. In the end it's nobody's business but the parents. They consulted doctors...she trained with them properly, she wanted to do it. When I was a kid , had you put a gps on me I can promise you I ran and walked and biked more miles in a day than an entire neighborhoods kids do today. This whole thing is just silly to me. She is going to grow up strong, and her joints and muscles are going to be fine. I mean..she's doing something natural, the body was meant to run and to move. It's said that kids have the healthiest and most natural form in the running world. Anyways...you get my point. Live and let live. The kid had fun and she's smiling! I'm surprised no one's screamed about her holding a pint glass. ;)

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  4. Has anyone ran behind a life runner at a race? Their shirts are tremendously depressing to stare at for miles when you're trying to complete the event of a lifetime (being that completing a distance run is a major accomplishment for most). Honestly speaking, I do not appreciate that message staring at me when I'm trying to complete 13.1. I find it demotivating rather than uplifting ... And those races are when I need uplifting messages the most.

    I do wonder if she is running because she wants to, or if the parents are so dedicated to the cause that they're using her for free press.

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    1. So dig deep and surge ahead of the life runner with the "offending" shirt. Seriously, you can't find anything else to look at during a 13.1 mile race?!

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    2. I did pass the shirts. Last weekend. Again. And again. And again. So many times that it got frustrating. Have you had to pass dozens of similarly demotivating messages on your runs?

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    3. I guess it all depends on your perspective. I don't find them demotivating. I admire people who run for a reason bigger than themselves and their egos.

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    4. And I admire people who don't hide behind anonymous log ins and troll people who post honest opinions.

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    5. Oh for goodness sakes...

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    6. Like either of those are you are your real names. Here in Victoria BC we have a giant pot leaf that runs a lot of half marathons, and is faster than I. If you want something to be depressed about.

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    8. Actually, that is my Chinese name. But thanks.

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  5. Amazing accomplishment for this little girl, but at what cost to her?
    The problem here is that she is 6. She may say that she loves to run, but she will also say "I love barbies and princesses...." All things come and go with kids this age.
    Her parents have now put her in a rotten position of being "the youngest to ever complete a 1/2", because now she will have to always be that kid. She isn't going to get to run for fun, she is for the next few years going to be a celebrity/side show. No more rolling down a hill because it is fun...this little girl will always have people watching her and making comments - good and nasty. They will also judge her parents (because let's face it...she didn't sign herself up for the race - unless she has her own credit card too...).
    I feel bad for them all. Bad decisions that came from a good intentioned parent (let the first "perfect" parent cast the first running shoe). Let her run because she enjoys it, don't publicize it like this.

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  6. What an amazing little gal! My 10 year old is doing his first half marathon on Saturday. We have been training for months and this was ALL his idea. Truth be told I tried to talk him out of if multiple times. He has been asking to do a half with me for years so I finally gave in. I realize 10 is A LOT older than 6 but I figure as long as she wasn't pushed into it then it should be fine.

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  7. I have zero problem with parents who know the sport and had their child checked out and cleared to run after appropriate training. If you've ever tried to run with a child who doesn't love it, as I have, you'll know that 13.1 is just too damn far for anyone to "make" a child run who doesn't want to. I still have horrible flashbacks about the 5k my 8yo "wanted" to do and how I ended up verbally dragging the whiney ball and chain she metamorphosed into. even a medal at the end didn't get a smile like this girly has! If she has a passion, let her pursue it without us perfect strangers judging her or her parents.

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    1. LOL!!! That just happened with my 7 year old at a sparkle me rad 5K event (that SHE wanted to do on Labor Day-not I)....even a medal at the end didn't get my kid's tears to stop about the longest run ever. I was half dragging her through the woods on the hottest day of the summer. I agree-let her run. Better than sitting on the couch playing video games IMO. :)

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    2. So true DebraLou!! When my youngest son was 6 he did the same thing at several 5ks that he begged to run!! My mom even had to pick him up and carry him part of the way during one race! You can't make a child love to run!

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    3. Agreed! My nephew wanted to do a 5K fun run (he's 6) and had been looking forward to it so desperately... when race time came, guess which poor auntie had to carry him for 2.5 miles on her shoulders? Yep. You can't force kids that age to run. If I didn't carry him he would have sat down on the course and threw a fit and caused a scene. Overall, kids are designed to run. We don't stop kids as young as 4 from playing soccer, doing gymnastics, playing t-ball or basketball, etc.

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  8. Appreciate her accomplishment. What does she weigh? So really how much pressure is being put on her joints? Before video games,we ran around all day so what is the difference? Just because it is an organized race? She rocked it! Enjoy it ! RUN ON !

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  9. I have to say it makes me somewhat concerned whether that's healthy for a kid so young, but another article I read about it talked about her stopped to look at ducks or something... it definitely made it sound like she wasn't being pushed into it, she really enjoys! As long she's not being pushed by her parents, and was ok'd by a doctor, good for her! Of course, that time is just faster than my current half PR set at age 28!

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  10. LIFE RUNNERS ARE A DISGRACE TO HUMANITY. KEEP YOUR DESIRE TO CONTROL MY HEALTH DECISIONS AND MY UTERUS TO YOURDAMNSELF. THE GIRL IS BEING BRAINWASHED.

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    1. You are in my prayers. Whatever horrible experience you had that made you so bitter is really, really sad. That little girl is an inspiration to many, even though you may disagree.

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    2. Do whatever you want with your uterus. Might I suggest a hysterectomy because having responsible sex doesn't seem to be in your skill set. Just don't kill the baby in your uterus that resulted from your irresponsible behavior.

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  11. It's hard to say whether or not it's unhealthy or right or wrong, but she looks like she had fun, I just hope that's not because the pint glass is empty...kidding!

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  12. If kids want to run, let them run. Let them run fast or slow, take walk breaks if they want. Race them and make it fun. It's awesome to see someone with a love of running and activity. Obviously it can be done. I would only worry if the parent was pushing the kid. It wasn't that long ago in human history that we had to rely on our legs to get us from point A to point B. I wonder if people consulted doctors before trekking across the country on the Oregon Trail.

    What an awesome little kid! Look at her face! I see happiness. What do you see? You know, it just goes to show that we can talk up a storm about getting our kids active, but maybe they will be more active if they hang out with active parents.

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  14. The whole things seems pretty extreme to me. The family is obviously on a mission, the Life Runner mission and the girl is part of it. "She" raised all that money? Well, I doubt it. It is a way of showcasing their cause. I always thought there were age limits to races. There must be a reason that kids in school do not race long distances. It's a gradual development. I don't think anybody has a clue what running that early will do to a child's development. Running is a neutral zone for me. I don't want to talk politics or religion and I certainly don't want to be have this in your face activism on the back of shirt in front of me. Zealousness creeping into running? I hope not.

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  15. I am not sure what to think. I guess it depends on how much is her wanting to do it and how much it is her parents. Kudos to her for finishing the half (and in a better time than I would have LOL). My daughter ran her first 10k at 8 years old and is now debating a half this year at 11 years old.

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  16. Running a 1/2 marathon at that age is bizarre. What is the point of it? An experiment of one. Difficult to know what to expect in terms of growth, menses, development, as this is out of the norm. If you want your kid to be the first experiment, then I guess it's OK.

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  17. I ran my first half marathon at age 34 this past February. While running, I came upon a 6 year old running the half with her 10 year old sister; they were trying to catch up to their 13 year old sister who was being paces by their dad. I still cannot wrap my mind around it. I caught their last name and check results after the race. They all finished and the 10 year old finished just minutes after me and several minutes before the 13 year old; the 6 year old was just a couple minutes after her. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around it.

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    1. It was the Cowtown half marathon. Now I want to go back and double check their order but I'm pretty sure I remember right.

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  18. This is absolutely ridiculous!! What are these parents thinking?! They have absolutely zero judgement and knowledge as to how damaging this is to their daughter. I'm not impressed.....I'm disgusted. I didn't start running until I was 14 and I'm thankful that I waited that long. I've seen with my own two eyes children that started training for the Junior Olympics at 8 and 9 years of age. The majority of these children were either injured or mentally burnt out by the time they entered middle school. Not only that, but the ones that were inured were unable to participate in even high school sports because of their parent's lack of judgement when these children were younger.

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  19. I'm sure she did the race because she wanted to! She's 6 years old and thinks her parents are the best and wants to do what they do. Will she do this when she's a teenager? Stay tuned...

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  20. That's insane. I feel like she will burn out, but I'm not sure

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  21. I'd be worried about repetitive stress injuries.

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  22. My first thought when I saw this story the other day was, "Oh, great. Don't let MY 6 y.o. see this." He is so competitive, loves being first and best, and was completely thrilled when he was the youngest participant at his first 5k when he was 5. I'm sure he would do a half if we let him. Our pediatrician said that it was great for him to run, as long as he trained properly and wore supportive shoes. That said, we wouldn't let him run such a long distance at his age. Proper training takes a lot of time and dedication, and we feel that it's much more important to be a well-rounded individual and have diverse interests than to set world records at age 6.
    I blogged about his 5k at 5... http://knowitallmrs.blogspot.com/2013/07/brownies-cheesecake-homemade-ice-cream.html

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  23. Just to throw a curveball - I wonder how miles per day Kenyan children run? And other running cultures? I don't think I've seen a short Kenyan yet.

    There's scientific proof that sports such as gymnastics damage children's growth plates and stunt their physical growth, yet no one bans the sport. How many hours a day do young gymnasts practice for? Probably less than this girl runs for. Good on her, and her family.

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    1. I was thinking that same thing. People were made to run evolution-wise so it's not unusual that a kid would like to run. Other cultures do it all the time. And like another poster said above, before there were video games and such, I'll bet if you put a pedometer on me when I was a kid I'm pretty sure my mileage would have come close to that during a usual playing day. We ran everywhere!

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    2. There is also proof that repetitive hits from a game called football leads to scarring on the brain which can lead to ______ (please don't require me to fill that blank in) later in life. However, that does not stop parents from letting and encouraging their 5, 6, 7 year olds from playing. There are so many ways that this conversation can go- I would just be ecstatic that my child had the desire to do a half marathon with me at any age.

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    3. Well said. I don't understand why people are being so negative about this.

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    4. My first thought after hearing some people debate the negatives of this was about the Kenyan children as well. I know they sometimes run pretty long distances to and from school. Of course, there could be serious medical/growth issues with that, but I have no idea since I don't have a medical background. I think if a pediatrician (or two... I would probably get a second opinion if it was my own child) said it was okay though, then that is probably more valid than me saying 'hmm I don't think that's a good idea."

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  24. Yes yes to Melinda ... I had read a comment somewhere (as was mentioned, blown up all over the place) that kids in other countries do this distance to get to school, to travel, etc. - this child is not by any means the first; at least three other kids her age have been cited in things I've seen and probably countless others in countries all over the place. People who are worried can maybe focus their efforts on kids who HAVE to run this far and let the parents take care of the kid who does so for sport. She and her parents are a great example in a very obese country.

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  25. I think she was used for her parents political objectives. Regardless if they are conservative or liberal views, you shouldn't use your kid. Notice how she's holding the medal so that it isn't in the way of the web address.

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    1. This. As uncomfortable as I am with a six year old running a half-marathon (I think its okay to run a little bit at that age, but that distance seems unhealthy for a little one), I was more disturbed by her "cause." Not sure how a six year old can have an understanding of all the complicated factors that go into her "cause." Raising money for cancer or world hunger is one thing, but to jump into the abortion debate fray at six is scary. And not just because I disagree with that particular viewpoint. I just don't know how a six year old can have a position on that subject -- its really an adult topic / cause. It made me uncomfortable.

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    2. Amazingly, even young children can understand that killing is wrong.

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    3. Oh god. A huge *eye roll* to this statement. I was respectful in my post, and its hardly as black and white as "killing is wrong." There are many other serious and mature implications when you are talking about abortion. Implications that a six year old cannot even begin to understand, appreciate or form a position on. If an adult wants to believe that the woman who is carrying the fetus does not have a choice in the matter, or there are no circumstances under which a fetus should not be permitted to continue to grow into a child, then that is fine for an adult to believe -- specifically because I assume that they have considered the issue from all of the nuanced positions of the situation. But, a six year old child is incapable of understanding those nuances and considerations, and therefore cannot form an actual belief on the matter. What does a six year old child understand about a woman's body and what happens during conception and pregnancy; let alone such issues such as rape, extreme poverty, severe disability, etc.?

      Please, continue to allow me to give adults that are anti-choice the benefit of the doubt that their beliefs are well-thought out and reasoned by not making black and white blanket statements that demonstrate the opposite.

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    4. Well written and well spoken. My previous statement stands as is.

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    5. I get confused when anonymous argues with itself.

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  26. Wow that is impressive yet scary too? I thought most half marathons had age minimums? Am I wrong or is this just Washington? Yes exercise and running is important if it something you love, it just worries me if it becomes too obsessive at a young age. Especially since they are still growing rapidly.

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    1. I think you are right, but maybe this applies to the bigger/national races like the Rock 'n Rolls? Not sure. Must be a race specific kind of thing not a general rule.

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  27. Aw, she's so cute. I really don't think 13 miles is a problem for a six year old. We were wild and crazy kids growing up and I'm sure we hit more than 13 miles some days, just playing games (not to mention our routine 2 to 5 hour roller skating sessions). Kids have boundless energy and muscles like rocks, and this distance doesn't have the dangers of a full marathon. Go her!

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  28. I have worked in the public school system for 18 years. In that time, I have seen kids come to school wearing the same clothes for weeks at a time, have heard parents call their children every possible name in the book, have seen cases of physical, emotional, mental and sexual abuse, and have called social services more times than I care to think about. Many of my students do not have parents who care about them or their future. Isn't it about time we worry about the future of these children, instead of parents who may or may not have a political agenda and obviously love their child - even IF they do push her to better herself and have goals. Yes - 6 is very young. I have 5 kids myself and would NEVER encourage any of them to run a half at that age. But after working with HHS 4 times this week, I think we are far too eager to jump all over someone for asking their child to have goals and dreams and not looking at the bigger picture.
    I'm done. That said - Beth -- you rock and good luck!!

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  29. Yuck. too much. playing all day and running around is one thing. 2 hour training runs is another. No 6 year-old wants to just run for hours on end. Clearly pressured by parents for their cause. It's gross.
    -ReneeW

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    1. Wow. Judge people much?

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    2. Maybe... but running the race is one thing. running for this particular "cause" is another. there is no way a 6 year-old understands all the complicated factors of the pro-choice/anti-choice movement. and it is unfair to her to throw her into the fray.
      IMHO
      ReneeW

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    3. So what do/would you teach your children about this particular topic? Just curious...

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    4. I'd wait until she was older (i have a 7 year-old) and talk to her about the consequences of unprotected heterosexual sex - including pregnancy. It is a highly personal issue that should be discussed with family, doctor, and clergy if appropriate.

      It isn't something that should be branded on a 6 year-old's T-Shirt.

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    5. "Anti-choice" is incorrect. It's "pro-LIFE"...or does that disturb you too much to admit the "choice" is about taking a life?

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    6. Highly personal? On a public forum? It is my job as a parent to not only allow my children the information to make good choices, but the guidance to help them make sound moral decisions as well.

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  30. Congrats to her. I'm glad she had a wonderful time and did not injure herself. Whether or not she "chose" to run for said charity is a moot point. The only things that matter are (1) she was cleared by a doctor (2) she was cleared by her parents and (3) she wanted to do it. There have been many times when on the trails with my 8 and 9 year olds we headed out for 3-4 miles but ended up doing 7-8 because we were having fun. My kids started running 5ks at 6 and I got bad looks and comments so I can only imagine what her parents are going through with comments from well wishers and concerned public. I know a runner who ran his first half at 9, first full at 10 and first 100 mile race at 12!

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  31. I'm all for kids running. My 8 and 10 year olds do track, cross-country and have each completed a few 5Ks. I would not, however, allow them to complete a half marathon at this time, mostly because no one really knows if it can cause damage later on. Why take an unknown risk? Let them run I say, but keep the distances reeled in. There is plenty of time later in life to conquer the longer distances.

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  32. I had to drag my 9 year old through a 5K that she wanted to do. I think this little girl must want to do the running and must enjoy it. It certainly looks like her parents are taking the appropriate precautions. Good for them. I also think they are wise to say no about a full marathon in the near future.

    If you do anything remarkable, some folks will criticize.

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  33. This story came out right after I did a very large 10K race in which there were quite a few children running- and I use the term running lightly- they were being cajoled by their parents, stopping in front of people, weaving in and out and then running back looking for their parents, etc. I have also run winter races in which I have seen children running alone, without proper gear - I have stayed back and run with them on occasion - I have commented a few times that I don't think children under 10 should be allowed to participate in 10Ks and that if your child is running any distance you should have to run with them. I know there are a lot of child athletes out there, I know that different children progress at different rates - but running a few blocks in the evening with your dad and dog are vastly different than running in a large event with a lot of other adults etc. It isn't an appropriate forum for this kids to participate- did you notice her holding the beer glass? regardless of what she uses it for, that is what it is- a beer glass meant for adults. Maybe there should be more races organized for kids- you want a kids 10K - then have a kids 10K - I want kids to run, I want my 16 year old to run with me, but I am tired of tripping over 5 year olds and listening to them cry and whine after mile 2!

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    1. I can't beleive parents are not running/staying with their young kids in the races. That's crazy!

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  34. As someone who works with children, I know they will tell you if they do not want to do something and running 13.1 miles takes a lot of wanting. I say kuddos to her parents for keeping her interested in something that she wants to do that is healthy and positive. And kuddos to them for being great examples. They consulted doctors and looked like they did all they could to keep their little girl safe and healthy. Who cares about the cup--there was probably juice in it. If you read the book "Born to Run" by Chris McDougall, some cultures have their children running as soon as they start walking and it's perfectly fine. It will be neat to see if this little gal ends up in the Olympic games in her future.

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  35. I did this race and ran with her for a bit. She had dang near perfect form, proper running shoes, and smiled a lot. She walked when she needed to, was taking in nutrition, held a steady pace, and the mom was super nice too.
    Ironically, people are bashing a girls parents for allowing her to do something she wanted to do. If the story was about a 6 year old who was 200lbs and diabetic, the posts would be yelling at the mom for not MAKING her kid go outside. Yet, when the kid shows interest in running, wants to run, she gets bashed for 'pushing' or for endangering her.

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  36. I ran a 5K earlier this year where I kept noting a young boy running the race. My mom-radar zeroed in on him because I didn't see any parent around him. I kept him in my sights the whole entire time. When I crossed the finish line, I saw his mom cheering him on. I saw his face and it was pretty happy.

    So on the one hand, it was great to see such a happy kid but on the other hand, he was clearly running by himself and that wasn't cool. (I would have pegged him at 8-9 year old age range).

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  37. Fascinating. I have to say I've seen some kids who just love to run and dang they have a boatload of energy so why not. as long as the dr doesn't see it causing any issues and they aren't being pushed to it...i say burn off the energy

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  38. I really go both ways on this. Great- I'm very glad the parents are promoting a healthy lifestyle and have showed their child that being active is fun and important. BUT-- I have read so much about how running too far too young is too hard on the body. Your body is still forming, your muscles are still growing, bones are still growing. The chance of severe injury increases doing this younger. Many professionals have stated that they don't even recommend running a marathon until at least 20. At this point your bones and body are formed to full extent (for most part) and the risks are severely reduced.

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  39. It's hard to say and, like you said, who am I to judge? Personally I think it's too much too soon but hey, if she got the docs ok and obviously she wants to race then go for it!
    Laughed out loud about the TIM! Can 38 year-olds enter?

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  40. When I was six years old, I thought it was great fun to spin around in circles until I vomited. Was this a smart idea? I guess it did no permanent harm (although I could've fallen over and smacked my head on something).

    I don't know any six year olds that just naturally want to spend that much time doing something in one shot. Does that make her extraordinary? Maybe.

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  41. I was at this race, and it was an extremely hot and humid morning. That said, this little girl crossed the finish line looking like she was having fun. She had clearly been well prepared, and hydrated properly out on the course (there were a several people who needed medical treatment during/after the race because of the heat and humidity). If you stopped and congratulated her at the finish, it truly seemed like no big deal to her and her parents. They seemed to be playing the accomplishment down, which I think was good.

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    1. Thanks for adding your first-hand experience. Her having fun with it and being properly fueled are the important points!

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  42. There IS a Toddler Triathlon. Check this out: I'm still not sure whether I should be in awe or express sympathy for these kids.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltqlTAqHo1w

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  43. If they checked with a pediatrician, she trained and WANTED to run it, why not?

    My stepson ran an 8k with me last year (at age 8) because he wanted to. But, we went at his pace; he determined our walk breaks and speed during the entire distance. I also carried water for him so that he could drink whenever he wanted/needed it. He was a little tired at the end, but otherwise great. This year, we're doing the race again and I'm sure he will want to beat his time from last year. No pushing, but I will help him achieve his goals to the extent that I can provided it isn't harmful. If he wanted to tackle a half marathon, I'd do the training and the race with him.

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  44. WOW Beth, So not used to reading so much political/social fighting on your blog! I prefer the "Is farting socially acceptable, as long as you claim it?" discussion. (I say yes) I hope the little girl had a great time! Good luck tomorrow!

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    1. Yes, I know. I was just asking if people thought a 6 year old running a half marathon was okay...and BAM, got all this other junk. Staying out of it.

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    2. Kept it classy, didn't comment, didn't delete. Nice job.

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    3. Oops! I thought your race was this past Sunday. Good Luck this weekend!

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  45. I think she is adorable....who gives a rats ass what her shirt says!

    I think I am on the fence about the whole thing(the running part) she is an amazing cutie pie!!

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  46. Well fortunately if she keeps this outlandish behavior up her uterus will just fall out and she won't have to worry about reproductive issues.

    Joke! Sheesh!

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  47. Let's assume that the parents have thought this through, sought professional input, weighed the pros and cons and came to a thoughtful decision on letting her do this. Many gifted kids are truly drawn to their gift whether its piano, art, math or athletics. If she loves to run let her run. God gave this gifted runner to these athletic parents for a reason. These gifted kids can tolerate more of their gift, whatever it is, in bigger doses because that is their "calling" for the moment or for forever. It is presumptious to doom her at 6 years of age. It is much easier as a parent to be too cautious concerning our kids activities. It is much more difficult to let go a little, encourage and see what happens.

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  48. P.S At 40 I was not mature enough to run around the block let alone a half marathon.

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