Friday, March 22, 2013

Stupid Runner’s Feet

After my 18 mile run today (you can tell me to shut up about my running if you want, or you could just not read), I cleaned myself up (think: hot bath with Epsom salts) and jumped into my compression wear. No, let me rephrase that – squeezed into my compression wear. It is so tight my ass might start pooping diamonds or something (that does not make sense, but whatever. I’m tired).

I guess tight is the point of compression stuff, n’est-ce pas? (did I ever tell you I was a French major in college? My son always asks what the heck I thought I might do with that degree. Ummm…run a lot and use a French word on the blog every other year?)

These are my favorite compression tights from 100% Play Harder. I did a review on them a couple years ago HERE. The best thing about them is they have little pockets along the hamstring and quad areas where you can put ice packs (or condoms or jellybeans). Genius.

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I also added in my compression socks, but no picture. Sorry.

Over the last three miles of the run many of my body parts hurt (not injury-hurt,  just I’m-sore-and-tired-and-ready-to-stop-moving-hurt). At least the scenery was decent.

18milerun

One of my many aching body parts was my feet. So, let’s discuss feet. I have not been blessed in this area. Toenail polish can only do so much. It’s kind of like putting a girdle on Homer Simpson.

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First of all, check out that freakishly long second toe. That toe could go to a costume party disguised as a finger. I can pick all kinds of things up with that toe – dirty underwear that needs to go into the hamper (this an advantage because no one wants to touch that with clean hands), dust balls, and used syringes I find on the street (kidding). I could also probably even flip people off:

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Morton’s Toe

I’m sure you all know but this long second toe (longer than your big toe) is called a Morton’s Toe and can be a runner’s nightmare.  It can (but not always does) lead to inefficient running and problems with biomechanics (some say it can cause the knee to not track straight when running).

Basically this means I was screwed as a runner from the day I was born. Oh, well. Nothing to do but keep running and getting injured I suppose.  Also, having a Morton’s Toe can cause excessive pressure on the second metatarsal of your foot. There is also something called Morton's neuroma can also develop, which is an inflammation of the nerve between the 2nd and 3rd toes. Very painful apparently and sometimes requires surgery. What to do to help prevent issues with this pain in the ass toe?

  • Add more cushioning in the forefoot of your shoes (where you push off)
  • Wear shoes with a wider toe box
  • Consider orthotics if you have pain or constant injury
  • Ice after runs

Bunions

How do you like my fancy bunion (an enlargement of the big toe joint)? I have them on both feet. The first time I ever went to a sport’s medicine doctor when I had just started running, he asked if the bunions caused me problems. He said they are an issue for lots of runners.  What does one do to prevent it from getting worse and causing pain?

  • Wear a shoe with a wider toe box to give the bunion room
  • Arch support inserts might help take the pressure off of the bunion area
  • When not running, avoid wearing high heels or shoes with narrow toe boxes
  • Do some foot rehab exercises
  • Surgery is apparently the only way to completely eliminate bunions

Don’t even get me started on other foot issues like black toenails (a great reason to wear nail polish), non-existent toenails (you can’t even tell, but my Morton’s Toe actually does have a nail) and blisters. I did hear on the Doctor’s show today that you can put antiperspirant on your feet to keep them dry and to help avoid forming blisters.

How about you? What feet issues do you have? Ever lost a toenail? Yes, I’ve lost a few in my day. I collect them and make necklaces that I will hand down to my children.

Do you wear compression stuff after every run or just the really long, hellish ones? I wear compression during and/or after runs of 10+ miles.

SUAR

70 comments:

  1. I was actually just thinking this after my own run this morning (not as impressive as your 18 miles - congrats!). My own feet are rather ugly as well, so it's nice to feel I'm not alone :) My main problem is that the skin gets so DRY - I swear, I'm body buttering that sh*t up like 8 times a day, and they're still like sandpaper. Also get random blisters - in different places, sometimes on short runs but sometimes on long runs, sometimes small and sometimes big... it's a pain. But I'm glad to have both feet, so that's something.

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    1. try putting petroleum jelly on your feet before you run.

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    2. try putting petroleum jelly on your feet before you run.

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  2. I have morton's toe also...although not as impressive as yours! I had a huge flare up in August, 2011 (yes, it was so horrible it's impressed on my mind forever!) when I bought new shoes with a too narrow toe box, UGH! But, going back to a wide box fixed me right up. I also find the foam rollering the hell out of the front of my calves helps trememdously to ward off the twinges that happen during and post long run.

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  3. My second toe is longer on my right foot, but not my left, and I have bunions, worse on my left foot. I've had my share of lost toenails. My toes are also short, and my feet are small, which isn't a bad thing, necessarily, but I can't share shoes with my daughter or most of my friends.

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  4. Geez, I'd say your feet are downright gorgeous compared to mine. I have Morton's Toes, Morton's neuroma in my right foot and really bad bunions on both feet. It's a wonder I can run at all. There's no guarantee that surgery works with the Morton's neuroma so I soldier on anyway. I love running way too much.

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    1. Hi, Mari! Just wanted to let you know that I have had surgery for Morton's neuromas on both feet (the last one was just shy of 4 weeks ago). I have had GREAT results both times and was back running as of yesterday (conservatively of course, but still...I logged 2.5 pain free miles so that is a great start, considering how much pain I was dealing with before). I had similar results the first time as well, and was running 3.5 weeks post-op. Surgery definitely works because they actually take the entire nerve out, so there is simply nothing left to cause pain. There is a small chance that the end of the severed nerve can eventually form what is called a "stump neuroma," but from what I have read, this is really quite rare. You DO have some numbness that never goes away (my outer two toes on both feet have very little feeling) but compared to how much pain I had, and all the crazy things I had to do to try and accommodate my neuromas for so many years, the little bit of numbness is well worth the outcome of the surgery. I read lots of horror stories on-line before having my surgery and was terrified of the result, so I just wanted to share with you how positive my experience was! If you ever do decide to do it, I definitely would urge you to seek out an experienced orthopedic surgeon...NOT a podiatrist. Good luck!

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  5. Majored in French in college...oh mon diet...mes pieds! Have a bunion of two. Small hurts. Wear compression socks on runs over 10. C'est tout

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  6. I have that, too. It SUCKS. I feel like it makes me walk funny. But thanks for the great post...made me laugh and it's nice to know I'm not alone in the "I HATE my feet department."

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    1. For some reason I only ever wear compression socks/sleeves while running. Never after.
      I've lost a few toenails along the way. Strange thing is that they never ever bothered me. I had no idea they were loose until the day they fell off. Somehow I've managed to steer clear of black toenails for six years. Hoo-ray!!!!!

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  7. I have extremely long ape like toes, and sport two freakishly long Morton's toes. I also had bilateral Morton's neuromas (see a theme here?) which I have now had surgery on both feet for, so I have nice long scars running between my 3rd and 4th toes on both feet. Oh, and did I mention my mutant pinkie toe which looks like a club and has a nail so tiny I can't even paint it? I swear one of the first things my husband said when our daughter was born was "Uh oh....she has your toes." And indeed she does, the poor kid.

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  8. I have Mortons Neuromas and they are the worst thing EVER OMG they hurt soooo bad! My ex boyfriend told me that I have monkey feet because my toes are so long LMAO

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  9. I have bunions on both feet (I feel like I'm 80 when I mention them "Oh my bunions!") but so far they haven't caused me any pain during or after running.

    I also have Morton's toes and THOSE cause me problems. When I run a distance longer than 6 miles the toes will be sore. During the late spring when I ramp up my mileage the toenails on those toes turn black and I lose the nails (every year!) I do make sure my shoes have enough room in the toe box but for some reason (my form?) those toes take a beating. So annoying.

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  10. I get blisters on that bunion area every time I get a race and sometimes just when I do a regular run.

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  11. My second toe is shorter than any of my other toes, so it's a reverse Morton's. It's very odd. I have duck feet. I do need a wide toe box. My pinkie toes suffer so I have to tape them before a race or a long run.

    I was also a French major in college! But I flunked out. I speak French fluently, though. Going back to school now after 25 years...

    It's so pretty where you run.

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  12. Your morton's toe makes me happy because it is on par with mine and I've never met anyone whose mortie even came close! Mine still has yours beat by a country mile but yours gives mine a run (wah, wah...) for its money!

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  13. I am having problems with my toes. Doc put me on antibiotics, did all kinds of extra bloodwork, send me to my foot doctor, who said oh, you're a runner, well, that's going to happen. Eventually, you'll develop calluses. Okay. Long as I can run, I'm good!

    I've only been a runner for a few years, and did my first full marathon this November. That being said, I am very interested in this compression pants AFTER run. I will follow the link for the pants and check it out. Love the idea of the pockets for ice.

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  14. My feet are absolutely hideous. 15 years of running has turned them into permanently calloused, blistered and black toenailed. Thus my blog name - Blisters and Black Toenails :D I too have bunions, they haven't caused me too many problems over the years thank goodness!

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  15. I haven't commented in really long time, my kids are way too high maintenance to allow that. I thought it should be be brought to your attention, though, that I am not so sure you have Morton's Toe as you do a freakishly short big toe. I mean, the rest of your toes look rather proportionate to your Morton Toe. As I am typing this though, it is also freakishly strange that I looked at your toes long enough to notice, sorry for that.

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  16. Wow, your feet are pretty compared to mine. I have lost many toenails no matter what shoe I try. I think I'm gripping the ground with my toes. No blister issues, yet and thank goodness for polish. And BTW, I'm in love with my podiatrist. After some custom-made orthodics, I feel like a new runner. :)

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    1. I have lost every toenail on both feet mulitple times and I have tried many different shoes and even wear a men's running shoe to give my big feet and long toes extra room. I have also come to the conclusion that my toes grip the ground when I run. C'est la vie!! (I took 4 years of French in high school).
      I almost never get blisters (although I believe the black toenails are actually blisters underneath the nail). Toenails are overrated anyway! :-) I am very thankful I am female and can put dark polish on my ugly toes!
      I also have Morton's toe but thankfully it doesn't seem to impede my running.

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  17. So glad to put a name to my injury on my left foot. Mortons's neuroma. Mine flared up after walking all over Boston in flip flops for a week, just when I was starting to run. Flares up after 3 miles of walking or running and unbearable. Burns like heck and then the rest of my foot goes numb to the point of not being able to walk. I went to a Podiatrist, got a Cortisone shot and it helped for about a week, nope, not doing that every week! Will have to read up on surgery, but happy to hear someone had good experience with it! Thanks for the info, always so entertaining and informative, all in the same post!

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  18. I have really ugly feet. Mine are short and wide. My husband swears my toes are missing a joint they are so stubby! I lose toenails all the time. I lost a total of 6 toenails last year, big toes and second toes on both feet, at the same time, and then just on my right foot, my big toe and second toe. They have finally grown back, 5 weeks out from my next marathon. I am actually more used to running without toenails than with, and want to cut down the newest one a tad.

    I like compression wear during and after runs of over 10 miles, or any race. I ran 20 yesterday, and slept in clean compression socks last night. I won't wear them for my 6miles tomorrow.

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  19. I compress for long/faster running, or if things are feeling funky in the leg-area...

    Foot issues: I'm just at the tail end of my first round with plantar fasciitis (not fun), and I have consistent fights with a metatarsal (that I broke once, healed crooked, and have a habit of stress fracturing when I look at it funny). More mundane problems include blisters and callouses. And blisters UNDER callouses, which are also super-fun. I have, however, avoided the black toenails of doom syndrome thus far in my running career...

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  20. Oh yeah. Feet.. I have the Morton's toe as well. I get horrible mountain ridges of calluses on the pad of my foot where my 2nd toe is.I was told that the problems come from toeing off the 2nd toe vs the ball of the foot, which I must do because of all the freaking calluses I get there. I get very weird nerve pain issues occasionally . I was born with some sort of circulation defect in my feet as well. Of course, the foot that is the worse , I sprain the ankle multiple times and broke one of the toes.....I am forbidden to ever put ice on my feet/ankles because of the circulation defect....I guess I can be happy I haven't ever had a nail turn black.
    I completely agree with lots of forefront cushioning, you will never see these feet in those vibram five fingers.

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  21. My feet look just like yours. My sister could flip me off with her Morton's toe without touching her feet.
    Vaseline and body glide on my feet keep them fairly safe. I have still lost lots of nails and my big toe on the right is still in recovery from losing its nail last year.
    I use compression all the time. I don't carry condoms though, they are my safety pants. ;)

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  22. I've never lost a toenail until last year when I got a wild hair to run Colfax on three days notice. I had only trained for a half marathon so...it was really a wild idea. Then I ran the Bolder Boulder. Then I ran Steamboat. I lost three toenails. I THINK they are normal now but it took almost 8 months. I was shocked how fast they dropped off.

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  23. I never seem to have a nail on my 2nd toe, and mine's not even longer than the big one (like someone's. *ahem*); I just paint the little stub. No nail will even grow anymore. Anyhoo...I had surgery to have my bunions removed when I was about...28? My bunions hurts like hell and on the right foot, I had to have surgery to reconstruct the foot bones. My PT thought part of my whole foot fiasco had something to do with this surgery. Possibly. I do use my left foot differently than my right, you can see by the wear on my shoes. But I don't heel strike anymore - yehaw!

    I've never worn compression. I haven't had a hard time with calves recovering. I'm sure one day I'll pull a calf muscle. Probably mid-race in Leadville.

    Hope your training's going well. Need to email you!!
    xo

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  24. For awhile I was getting blood blisters all the time. And I am a picker so my feet were looking pretty sorry. Luckily my newest shoes have helped with that. I had surgery for Morton's neuroma a year ago. The scar adds character. And it feels soooo much better. I kind of want it again though because my podiatrist was hot :)

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  25. I completely laughed for about 2 minutes about your toe going to a costume party as a finger, my 5yo thinks I am now crazy, thanks for the laugh

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  26. My Mortons neuroma is killing me. The only shoes I can wear comfortably are minimalist (Brooks pure flow and cadence) Traditional shoes, brooks adrenaline, cause it to flare. But, I have trouble running more than 4-5 in minimal shoes. Cortisone helped briefly. Looking to have sclerosing injections to kill the nerve. Surgery as a last result.

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  27. I have claw feet (hammer toes) which causes my right foot tons of pain on runs over 6-8 miles! I will push myself through a half marathon, but it makes me mad because i dont know if i will ever be able to do a full marathon! I don't think I could handle surgery, the cortisone shot was pure hell!

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  28. Massive Morton's toe here as well, plus I'm an 11 1/2 4E, with a very high instep and low arch. My choice of shoes is frustratingly limited. The worst part about my feet is that every time I walk in the wet sand at the beach, I half expect to see photos of my footprints in the next national geographic.

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  29. My husband had his Morton's neuroma successfully removed about 12 years ago after suffering in severe pain for many months. He never realized he was squeezing wide feet into regular shoes, this after many years of marching in the military. He runs marathons now with no foot issues other than the occasional loss of toe nails. Me - no real foot issues other than bunions. Having an issue with my IT band, so no running for me right now.

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  30. My feet are actually in pretty good shape considering I'm finishing up half-marathon training. (Race is next week... yikes.) But I have also discovered the bestest thing ever for keeping your calluses and blisters away and helping to heal the ones you have. Kiehl's Cross-Terrain "Dry Run" Foot Cream.

    Seems to be marketed toward dudes, but I've been putting it on pre-run and post-run after my shower, and it does wonders for keeping your feet in better shape. Without it, I tend to get callused and blistered at the tips of my smaller toes (I think because I curl them down tightly when I run and push off, they certainly aren't longer than my big toe, far from it.) and at the base of my big toe, where it meets the sole, and the side of my big toe.

    I think the cream just dries to a powder-like finish and soaks up the sweat, which is why I tended to blister. Smells nice, too. After using it for a while, I'm just getting rid of the last of my calluses and rough skin from where I blistered weeks and weeks ago.

    My main worry at the moment is getting rid of the last vestiges of "turf toe" on my left foot (I think I stubbed my toe a tad when running on the treadmill at a high angle, all the way back in January) and a little bruising around the base from slipping in the shower last week, when it was already nearly completely recovered. Let's just say I stubbed said toe and it tried to go in a different direction than the rest of them. Turned a bit bruised but no swelling. I think I'll be okay by race day.

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  31. What road is that in the picture- southeast Longmont?

    I have a Morton's Toe and bunions and half a nail on my big toe from jamming it on a 8 mile hike last year. That being said- no pain... but I am a walker - not a runner. Have a half marathon in Wisconsin in May and all concerns and issues are the same with me. At age 60 I 'm pretty lucky to just complain bout this.

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    1. Hey Peg - It is Vermillion Rd which is north Longmont after you cross Hwy 66.

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  32. Kind of in a pissy mood today & honestly, the picture of that toe made me laugh out loud. Apparently funny feet brighten my day.

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  33. You inspired me to blog about my ugly foot.

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  34. I also have a freakishly long second toe, my dad has always told me it was a sign of intelligence. I am 100% sure he was just saying that to make me feel better, but I guess I don't care!

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    1. I'm going to go with your dad's theory too. Tell him thank you.

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    2. my Mother-in-law swears the long toe is a sign of higher athletic ability. I think she's wrong, since her son and grandson trip over their freakish long toes.
      I too have terrible feet, but only to be out-uglied by my best girlfriend who was a ballerina all her life. Her toes, while not blistered any more, are misshapen from toe shoes, and she's lost so many toe nails, most of them haven't grown back EVER!!! I will take my feet any day over that hot mess.
      As for me, I have one toenail that doesn't like long runs. I have lost it several times, but it only started when my son stepped on my bare foot while he was in sneakers and somehow twisted his foot on top of mine. He learned many new words that day that he's not allowed to repeat. It's been a problem ever since then. My nail technician works on keeping it looking relatively normal, even made me a "fake toenail" when I had to go to a black tie event with strappy shoes. It lasted the night, which was all I wanted. Pretty feet are overrated anyway. The legs we get from running are all the better, and really, who wants a partner who's into feet? I would rather have a leg man any day!
      Amy P, Philly runner

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  35. R Bunion which hurts sometimes (see beginning on L), along with very wide flat feet and overpronation. And then Brooks screwed up the trim on the newest model of Ariels so that the first short run was giving me pinky toe blisters (Ariels were all I could wear, along with custom orthotics) and I'm trying frantically to find new shoes. Trying old models of men's version of Ariel called the Beast - think I'm now a mens 8.5 4E (seriously?!) but my orthotic is made for more of a EE (wmns 4E) and so there's a gap between orthotic and shoe that causes problems. Thing is, new shoes are pricey at $140 a pop - but new orthotics are $400 a pair. Trying to figure out ways to manage till I find a new shoe or get my annual orthotic update in June.

    Haven't lost a toenail, but some of them don't seem to grow much anymore and others thicken in response to being beat up. Did have a multi-year issue with L big toenail - smashed it up during marathon training (beat against shoe) then it got a fungus, nasty for a long time. A few blisters, blood blisters.

    Compression - I love the 110% line - have the shorts, knee sleeves and socks/calf sleeves. Figured I'd go the mix/match. Fab with the ice and darned good w/o it. I use compression calf sleeves for long runs/hard speed workouts (CEP and Zensah) and compression socks for recovery, including sleep. Have some leg vein issues so actually wear compression socks every day. (ugh)

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  36. A neuroma is one of the most painful of all running injuries because it involves a nerve. I developed the condition in May 1989 when I was running on vacation in Chamonix, France, in the valley below Mont Blanc. One of the most beautiful runs of my life was interrupted at eight miles with a sharp, searing pain. When I got home, it would happen every time I reached eight miles. Over time, it would start earlier and earlier in my runs (at 40 minutes, then 30 minutes, then 20 minutes ... you get the idea). By September, it would come on in the first mile. Bo October, I was forced to stop running. By November, I could barely walk 100 yards without stopping to give my barking nerve a rest. My podiatrist injected me with cortisone twice over the course of six months in a failed effort to avoid surgery. My neurectomy was successful, but only because I carefully followed the strict post-op therapy guidelines. PT included regular hot-cold contrast baths and message of the incision to minimize the formation of scar tissue. If too much scar tissue forms, you can end up with the same symptoms you had before the operation. Mari should be aware that surgery on a neuroma, if performed by a skilled surgeon, is a highly successful procedure if post-op therapy guidelines are followed. However, I strongly disagree with Step F.'s advice to Mari about seeking out an orthopedic surgeon. Many of them rarely, if ever, perform this procedure. My neurectomy was performed by a podiatric surgeon at the Saint Francis Memorial Hospital Center for Sports Medicine in San Francisco. If Mari lives near a major metropolitan area, she should have no problem finding a skilled and experienced podiatric surgeon who performs many of these procedures. If she lives in a remote, rural area, she should consider traveling to the nearest urban medical center where she can consult with a podiatric surgeon that can perform the neurectomy, relieve her pain, and get her up and running again. Good luck, Mari!

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  37. I find feet kind of fascinating, yet repulsive. My two feet are different from each other. When I was a kid I broke the big toe on my left foot, and it now looks very different from my right big toe. I also discovered, while being treated for plantar fasciitis last summer, that my right leg is a half inch (at least) shorter than my left. My left arch is nearly flat and that foot is wider because of years and years of it bearing the brunt of my high-impact activities. (And how I avoided PF for so many years, I don't know, but I made up for it last year.) My right arch is normal. However, for whatever reason, I scrunch the toes on my right foot when I run, especially my second toe, so I have epic calluses on the tips of those toes - but not on my left. Weird. Back when practiced a lot of yoga, several teachers told me I had good "yoga feet" because they are wide and duck-like. Great for yoga, not so great for strappy sandals. Oh well!

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    1. ooops, didn't meant to post as my ten year old son! His feet, even at a size ELEVEN, are in great shape!

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    2. Good luck Kayla, my age and shoe size were the same number from 8 years old until 15. You've got some fun shoe shopping ahead of you. But at least more stores actually carry sizes up to 13. After that, I suspect you and your son will be joining me on the internet shoe hunt. I feel for you.

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  38. I started putting compression sleeves on my ankles after a recent stress fracture scare a month ago(x-rays say false alarm), and noticed some benefit. But I haven’t had any other issues yet. Of course I’ve only run 10+ miles a five times.

    Typing that sentence just awakened my newbie nerve.

    As we come out of winter here (it’s leaving fast) and I end up running in shorts instead of tights, I’ll be paying more attention to the potential need for post run compression. And my feet were hideous before I started running. I’m not sure if having all of my toe nails fall off would be better or worse, but wearing moisture wicking socks more often has helped with persistent athletes foot, so that’s good.

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  39. Deodorant on your feet does help with blisters. Actually, you need anti-antiperspirant, but don't think there are many deodorants these days without it. I only get blisters when I race, so I assumed it had something to do with running faster. I remembered to put it on my feet for my 5K earlier this year and I didn't get any. I didn't think I would need it for my first half a couple of weeks ago because I would be running slower, but I was totally wrong. I could feel the burning at about mile 4. When I took off my shoe, I had actually worn a hole through my insole where my blister was. I will definitely be using it for any race from now on!

    As for over sharing about running, I did take a picture of my nasty blister foot and I wanted to post it on Facebook, but thought better of it. Sent it to my mom instead!

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  40. I won't tell you to shut up about your training, but I will tell you to shut up about your bunions. Mine are more than twice that size and cause plenty of problems (like, that joint always hits the ground first, so I bear all my weight on one joint). Mine are onion-sized. Onion bunions. You just have, like shallot bunions or scallion bunions.

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  41. Does anyone recommend a running shoe that will alleviate pressure on my now bunion forming foot? I just started feeling pain in my right foot and my husband thinks its a bunion forming. I was running in mizunos and recently switched to asics. I also have morton toes and my dad said it was considered fancy in medieval ages..that women who most likely had that, were princesses ;)

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  42. Congrats on your run.
    I enjoy your humor, you have a rather unique way of expressing yourself.
    I ran a half marathon today and I am aching, sore and tired.

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  43. It makes me feel so much better that Im not alone with the Morton’s Toe issue. Im glad to know that there are other runners out there with this.

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  44. I have a real aversion to the idea of foot surgery. Can you imagine having your bunions shaved down to have pretty feet but not change the issue causing it?! That is the claim of my chiropractor. He is a genius of course. I say rock those runners feet and black toe nails!

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  45. I have the same toe issue (Morton's) and have have the neuroma. I also suffer from metatarsalgia. Fun times! I also live in my compression gear (capris/sleeves) after my long runs.

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  46. Now I feel downright pretty with my feet after reading about everyone's freakish feet. And I have some fugly feet, I call them diamond-toes, my big toes each have a large triangle shaped joint, perfect for bunions to perch on, I pull out the cheese grater often. A freakishly large big toe means an itty bitty pinky toe with less than a sliver of a nail--just plop that polish right on the skin, please!
    Yep, I feel right at home with y'all funny feet people. :)

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  47. I read everyone's posts to see if anyone mentioned 2Toms products for blister prevention and I didn't see it. They have 2 products that I SWEAR by: BlisterShield and SportShield (anti-chafing). You can check them out here, I think you'll like them. My local running & biking stores carry them. http://www.2toms.com/

    I've been running 15 years and am 65 years young - pretty feet are a thing of my past - haven't worn sandals in years! Stride on everyone!! :)

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  48. Wow-my toes look just like yours.. Except much, much worse. I had surgery on the left big toe (because of a bunion and osteoarthritis) that fused the joint and it now only bends at the knuckle. That makes it hard to push off correctly and I have issues with pain in the side of that foot if I run more than 10 miles at a time. The 4th toenail on my left foot is black, the 3rd nailfell off 3 weeks ago, and the second toe is so calloused that you can't tell the nail from the callous. My right foot is just about as bad but at least the big toe bends properly. I also get a blister between my big toe and first toe on long runs because of the way the bunion forces my toe to the right. That spot is starting to callous as well. The only good thing about the delayed spring here in Michigan is that my open toed shoes can stay in the closet.

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  49. I have a bunion on my left foot. I did have the surgery to remove the right foot bunion and it's perfect now. I would recommend and something I wished I did was do both of them at the same time. It will make you immobile, but it's worth it. The recovery is painful, but you won't want to go through it twice.

    Also, maybe your diamonds pooping reference is from Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Cameron's ass is so tight. If you stuck a lump of coal up it, in two weeks, you have a diamond.

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  50. No bunions. No weird toe issues. But I have really flat feet so I triple over pronate. Causes knee issues. I spent $30 on compression socks and can't find any real use for them. I was wearing them *during* my runs though. I will try them afterwward and see if there is any real difference. Thanks for posting.

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  51. You're feet have nothing on my franken-feet. I also have Morton's toe, two bunions that so bad that surgery meant removing other bone in order to straighten things out before the actual bunion removal. I have screws in both feet still. Toenails? Yeah, I have three that are legit. The rest are a combination of part skin/part nail/part blister turned callous. My big toenail doesn't even touch the nail bed anymore, it just grows upward and outward. Thanks for sharing, and know there is always someone else with worse feet than you :)

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  52. Because of my Morton's Toe, which is only a smidge longer, I have this toe crossing problem that's uncomfortable in my shoes. I've been reading about wearing sports toe socks and how it's supposedly some cure all for the problem -- but the thought of toe socks makes me want to cry. Ick.

    Thoughts?

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  53. I have Morton's Toe also...I've called it ET Finger Syndrome. The only issue I've had there is on my left foot, the longer toe is calloused on the tip.

    I've lost my share of toenails in the past. I learned that there are really two different ways that can occur; one, shoes too tight/narrow, not a problem for me or in my case it was because I was curling my toes downward inside the shoe when I ran. My local running store helped me figure that out by pulling the sock liner out and inspecting it, there were some serious divots where my toes lined up. I adjusted my running form a bit and have not had any problems since. I also started using the Iniji toe socks, and have not had blisters or blackened/lost toenails.

    I wear compression sleeves on my calves during my spring training ramp up, since I usually have a little calf strain when I come off my winter off-season break. After a few weeks, I don't need them during a run, but will wear them after my longer runs.

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  54. My second toe is a normal length, but my third toe is the exact same length as my second toe (I don't know if there's a fancy name for that). Most shoes are already angling down towards the pinky toe at that point, so my third toe gets bent in pretty much all shoes. This leads to corns on the top of both my third toes. It's not too big of a deal, though. Every couple months I buy those corn remover pads from the pharmacy and remove them and it's fine.

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  55. Part of that appears sort of a foot. remainder of it? Hmm…maybe a pork chop.
    Dr. Carlos Cooper

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  56. Sant Ritz's charming address offers a world of opportunities for your little ones in the future.the interlace condo

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  57. Hey Beth keep posting more of your feet, they are really beautiful

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  58. Oh.... So Bad Injury :/ but great ideas and descision :)

    running foot injuries

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  59. because humans have been running unshod since homo erectus over 2 mya, the foot is a perfect running mechanism that has been mistreated as a result of western running shoes. minimalist shoes are the way to go, im 62, been running for 23 years, but my back was giving out and my knees were done for, a friend suggested barefoot or shoes with no heel aka minimialist shoe. my problems have since gone, no pain, i am running the boston marathon next year. running shoes are the fad, as they only came around 30-40 years ago. humans have been using their bare feet since day one. give it a try.

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