Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Heart Rate Training for Clueless People (Like Me)

Whoever said patience is a virtue definitely trained with a heart rate monitor before they started spewing out quotes.

There are 3 reasons I am late to the party and have put off using a heart monitor for so long:

  1. It’s confusing – What the hell does 70% of heart rate max mean? How do I figure out a resting or max heart rate? Who cares? Life is too short for this mess.
  2. It’s annoying – I do not want to strap on (I said strap on!) that chest thing every time I run. It will bother me and impede the growth of my breasts. I know they are still growing!
  3. It will make me slow down – I suspected I had been running at heart rates that were much too high. I knew if I started training with a monitor and attempting to keep within the right “zones,” I’d have to slow down. My ego would scream “loser!” “slacker!” and “lazy sack!,” and my neighbors would judge, that is if they cared.

What I’ve found is that only one of these is true: #3.

It’s not all that confusing and it’ s not at all annoying. But, once I strapped on the monitor, I’ve had to check my ego at the door and not judge myself based on pace. My one and only goal has become to stay in the appropriate heart rate zone for my workout. Period.

P1120872

See? No big deal. And, it matches my bra.

In all of my prior training plans, I have set goals based on pace. The problem with this is that I was training at paces where I was exerting myself too much and didn’t even know it. I am positive this  contributed to injury. When people say you over-train, it doesn’t mean you are necessarily running too many miles, etc. It means you are training at paces that do not improve performance over the long term. Paces that are likely too fast for your target heart rates.

If you don’t believe me, check out this article by Mark Allen, pro triathlete and six-time Ironman Triathlon World Champion. He sums all of this up very well – better than I could ever hope to.

Why Train with a Heart Rate Monitor?

I am no expert on this topic, so feel free to chime in. I’m just trying to learn all I can. Recently, I’ve read two books that address the subject: Rich Roll’s, Finding Ultra and John Parker’s, Heart Rate Training: the Compleat Idiot’s Guide (which I found online for .42¢. Yes, CENTS).

P1120874

Here’s why I am chugging the Kool-Aid at this point:

  • Most of us stink at gauging how hard we are working. Heart rate provides an objective gauge of exertion. It is usually more exact than your own perception of how hard you're working. This is important for people like me who are clueless and have to go balls to the wall all the time. I need permission to slow down.
  • By training in the correct heart rate zone, you train your body to adapt. Soon you will be running faster at lower heart rates (this means faster with less exertion).
  • Most people train in the “gray zone.” A place where too much effort is put out to strengthen the aerobic system, yet too little is put out to increase the anaerobic threshold. This is where I have spent most of my running life.

It’s that level of effort that leaves you feeling nice and winded after a brisk run but yields little in terms of performance improvement. It undermines true progress. It leaves you tired, with little to no gains in either endurance or speed. It creates plateaus that stunt athletic development and often lead to injury.” (Rich Roll, Finding Ultra).

  • Keep in mind, you will not always be running “slow.” With heart rate training, there will be specific workouts to improve speed, endurance and strength. The trick is that target heart rates vary and hard/easy days alternate.
  • By staying at an aerobic level in training and racing, you can use fat as your fuel source – this gives you an unlimited source of fuel.

How Do You Get Started?

  • Spend .42¢ on a book and/or read this article from Runner’s World.
  • Get a watch with a heart rate monitor. I purchased the Garmin Forerunner 210, but there are many less expensive options, especially if you don’t care about having a GPS.

P1120806

  • Find your resting heart rate by recording your pulse when you wake up and before you get out of bed in the morning. Mine is 51 beats per minute (bpm).
  • Find your max heart rate. There are formulas for this and you can also have it done at a lab. But, this is how I found mine:
    • After warming up for a couple of miles, I ran as fast as I could for 2 to 3 minutes, then jogged for 1 minute.
    • I repeated this 3 times and took the highest heart rate that was recorded. You can also do hill repeats.
    • This is not exact, but it’s a good starting point. My max heart rate is 186 bpm. This could be low. If I see a higher  number during a race or workout, that becomes my new max.
  • Use a formula to figure out percentages of your max heart rate:
    • 70% – 75% of Max (this is the zone where you do recovery and long runs):  (Max minus resting HR) x .70 + (Resting HR). For me, this would be (186-51) x .70 + (51) = 145 to 152 bpms.
    • 85% (zone for tempo runs): (Max minus resting HR) x .85 + (Resting HR). For me, this would be (186-51) x .85 + (51) = 165 bpms
    • 90%-95% (zone for interval/speed workouts): (Max minus resting HR) x .90 + (Resting HR). For me, this would be (186-51) x .90 + (51) = 172 to 179 bpms
  • Set up your training plan according to zones. Alternate hard and easy days. For example: Mon:  6 miles @ 70% of max heart rate. Tues: Warm up 1 mile @ 70%. Run 3 miles @ 85%. Cool down 1 mile @ 70%. Wed: 6 miles @70%. Thursday: Off. Friday 12 miles @ 70%.
  • Note: Target heart rates zones are different for running than cycling.

How Does It Feel When You First Start?

  • SLOW. Like, painfully so. Most of us have a groove we get into when we run. A pace we naturally gravitate towards. Running at 150 bpms has made me slow down at least one to two minutes per mile.  Sometimes it is tough for me to run slow enough to stay at my target heart rate on my 70% runs. I’ve feel like I’m running through mud.
  • A relief. Running has become fun again. I am not tired. I take in my surroundings. I can have conversations.
  • Refreshing. I am recovering quickly. I have no aches or pains. The day after a longer run, I am able and ready to go again.
  • In control. I finally feel like I am taking the reins with my running. It is no longer haphazard or based on someone else's plan. It is completely and totally tailored to where I am fitness-wise.
  • Focused. Running slower has let me hone in on perfecting my form.

You may not be ready to take this on, or maybe you have been doing it for years. Whatever the case, heart rate training is a way to objectively gauge exertion and progress. I figure I have nothing to lose, so I’m going to try it for a few months and see what happens. Maybe I’ll become slower than I am already, but I doubt it. I’m already seeing progress. 

Do you train with a heart rate monitor? Have you seen progress?

Any tips to add?

SUAR

91 comments:

  1. I keep trying to, but I am so slow that I literally almost have to walk in order to be in the proper zone and it drives me nuts! Sooo, now I use it to calculate calorie burn...and that's kinda sorta it :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This was the case for me when I first started running by heart rate - I thought surely my target "easy" zone was too low because I would have to stop to walk to keep it low enough. But after a year and a half of consistently running by HR, and working in speed workouts once/week (intervals, tempo or 10K or shorter race), I am now much faster in my "easy" zone (and all of my other zones.

      Delete
  2. I've always wondered about heart rate monitors... this post really helps me understand it a little better.. thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I will wear my HR strap during races, but I really should more often. I will be referring to this post again in the future.

    ReplyDelete
  4. have you found that you can run faster on the treadmill while staying your heart rate zone then you can while you're outside? i'm dabbling in heart rate training and have found that i can maintain 8-9 min paces on the treadmill but am forced to slow significantly down outdoors. i'd love someone else's input :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haven't run on the treadmill with it yet, but I have heard that treadmills require less exertion due to lack of terrain variation and wind. Also, apparently there is some forward propulsion with the treadmill. Guess it makes sense your HR would be lower.

      Delete
  5. I haven't tried HR training for running, but for cycling, it has really helped. Before, I was worried about going too hard or too easy!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks so much for this post, it's excellent! I may buy a new HR monitor when I'm a little more experienced, I used to use one in Spin class, and it was really good for keeping me honest (so I didn't just 'look' like I was working hard)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I've always wondered about heart rate monitors, but like you said, I have a feeling I'd be forced to slow down so much that I would look downright stupid. So yeah, dumb reason. I get injured a lot too, though, so I'm interested in how much you notice that heart rate training makes a difference in that department. I thought injury (ITBS in my case) had more to do with the distance load, enough rest, and proper form.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suffer ITBS and I think what you will find running with your HR as a guide is that you won't overdo it, which is where ITBS comes in. It doesn't matter if you on a treadmill or out in the open, if you run by your HR you should almost be ignoring the speed you are going

      Delete
  8. I haven't done any HR training, but my husband uses it quite a bit for cycling, especially for long endurance rides. His first attempt at Death Ride (125 miles with 15,000 feet of climbing) was a DNF but the following two were successful because he kept his HR in a lower zone.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Awesome post!! Thank you! You just took all the scary out of it. I've always ignored that function on my Garmin. Guess I'll be doing some reading this weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yes, yes, I have one and never and I mean never use it for the exact same reasons!!! It's way too hard to figure put and deal with!!!! Ugh!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Great post! I'm so bad about running slowly enough on my recovery runs. I'm pretty good about hitting long run effort, but I definitely run my recovery runs at a higher heart rate than I should. You're right, it's really hard to go that slow. I've been feeling burnt out lately; maybe I should be paying better attention to my heart rate.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great post! I couldn't agree with this more. Ever since I started training by heart rate I have more energy after I run and I recover more quickly. Basically, everything you said too. It also allows me to focus more on my form because I am not so focused on speed. Focusing on how I feel when I run is so much better. I am a happier, less stressed runner. I don't get nervous before races anymore because I'm no longer stressing about my finish time. Pace is overrated...people should pay more attention to heart rate. Just because you are able to run faster...doesn't mean you should.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm like Heather in that I worry that if I would follow my heart rate for training, I'd have to slow down practically to a walk to stay in the appropriate zone for aerobic training. Probably for me it's because I'm a very new runner and am still getting in shape, period. Maybe after I complete my first half in October I'll start working with the heart rate, and if I have to walk to stay in the zone, I'll just do it and go from there. What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This might be true, but it should only take a month or so before you see improvement. It requires patience and looking at the big picture. I just keep telling myself I won't be this slow forever. If you read about people who have trained this way, they have seen changes rather quickly. If you are already well into training for your half, I would finish that and then start HR training. That's kind of what I did as well. I have a half in Sept and I'm going to experiment with heart rate during racing...for a half you should be at about 85% during the race.

      Delete
  14. I'm curious, do you think the "Jeff Galloway" method could possibly keep newer runners into their heart rate zones ... sort of coincidentally? I am planning to start testing out heart rate running soon (one of our clients makes heart rate strapless bras so I have a batch to test out), but I'm wondering if I were to re-incorporate some Jeff Galloway intervals from my newbie days, would it keep me in good zones too? Ie, we run for 8 minutes with a comfortable but not killer pace, then have a 1 minute brisk walk or so. Does that kind of keep us from going overboard?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that would definitely help although the only real way to know is by using a monitor. I do think the run/walk method would keep newer runners at a more reasonable heart rate, tho.

      Delete
    2. My training team is doing the Jeff Galloway method (and Chi-Running for form) for our 1/2 marathon on Sept 1st. The walk intervals really help to get your HR back into the correct zone quickly after a run interval. We are all a few minutes/mile slower than we were last year but I feel that our cardiovascular systems are in much better shape by using the HR zones and the Jeff Galloway method. I personally feel much better after all of my runs even the 12.5 mile LSD run last week. It's nice to actually be able to function the rest of the day after a long run. I will be upping the run/walk intervals ratio for the next 1/2 training for next year which will in turn increase my speed but still allow my HR to be in the right zone.

      Delete
    3. Thanks for the replies on this! I am very curious about this. I used Jeff Galloway back in my newbie days during Couch 2 5k, but am thinking of revisiting his methods. I've been experimenting over the last couple of months and I usually have slightly faster times if I actually incorporate walk intervals. I'm talking just like a 1 minute walk interval after 2 miles or so. Not like run 5 minutes and walk for 1 minute. It's just interesting how I actually do better and I also feel better after longer runs. I was assuming it is more 'heart-rate' friendly. I'm going to get my Garmin heart rate monitor going here soon and see if I can start collecting some data on this. I agree with the whole general concept - "run healthy to become a better runner" :) So glad for this post SUAR!

      Delete
    4. I find with a walk/run plan like Galloway that my heart rate tends to *fall* too far during the walking interval. With the heart rate method, you should stay in a 10-point aerobic zone, which probably is better for consistent cardio work.

      Delete
  15. Great post! I have the feature on my Garmin, but never really paid much attention to it. But like other commenters, I am not sure I could actually be "running" if I were to stay in my appropriate zones. I am assuming I can count my avg HR for a target time/distance. Knowing me, I would now be obsessed with staying right at that number as opposed to my pace. It's always something.
    Thanks for the info!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I was pretty skeptical about HR monitoring, but your post has got me thinking. My friend has an extra one that should be compatible with my Garmin... maybe I'll take it out for a spin this week.

    My main issue with the whole thing is adding another gadget on top of my Garmin -- I'd like to say that I'm a running purist, but in my heart of hearts, I love gathering as much data as I can.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I have tracked my heart rate data for awhile. It is interesting to see it change (gets higher when I'm sick or not recovered enough), so it is definitely helpful. I was getting injured often and I think it was because I was constantly training too hard and too fast for what my body could do at that point. Monitoring my heart rate has helped me from over exerting myself and I've now been running injury free for over a year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly!! It's also a good way to know if you ar over trained b/c your resting heart rate will be higher if you ard doing too much.

      Delete
  18. First, great legs!!!

    I've been running and coaching for a long time, and it's only now that I'm in my 40's and am not the fastest guy at training, that I start needing to run my easy runs easy!!! I don't have a Hart Rate Monitor, but I keep finding myself saying keep the HR down, Good artical you've writen, going to get some friends to read it.

    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  19. Just to avoid confusion with other people's calculations: what you have worked out is percentages of "heart rate reserve", i.e. percentages of the difference between your resting HR and max HR. This is not the same as straight % of max HR. It is called the Karvonen method. For example, let's say I have a max of 200 and resting of 50. If you calculate 90% you get two different numbers:
    Of simple max HR: 180 bpm (.9 x 200)
    Of HRR (Karvonen): 185 bpm (.9 x 150 + 50)
    Five bpm is quite a bit if you are running at threshold. So long as you don't mix the two calculation methods from different people's programs it'll be fine. You need to check what your watch's display is showing if you are using the %HR data field. I think it shows %max if you haven't entered a resting HR, and %HRR if you have entered a resting HR - but you should check.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed, Steve is right. Also, the percentages of max heart rate that are listed for specific types of running (e.g. tempo) seem to correspond specifically with max heart rates, not Kervonen percentages of heart rate reserve.

      Delete
    2. I meant to say they correspond with suggested percentages of max heart rate that I have seen elsewhere, as I have been doing some cross checking in different articles. I really appreciated this post, SUAR. It has opened up an interesting world to discover. Thank you.

      Delete
  20. Thanks for the post! After 31 years of running I got my first HR monitor and GPS two weeks ago. I'm still not convinced about everything as I AM VERY OLD SCHOOL :) I do love stats so that is a bonus. I need to get that book right now!

    ReplyDelete
  21. *This* is why I've read your blog for as long as I have. There's just the right mix of fart/kid/daily funnies stories AND practical running advice. I love the balance.
    Thank you for sharing what you've learned about heart rate monitoring. I have the Garmin 610 and have been meaning to try out MY strap-on. (haha!) Glad to have this info to get me started.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I'm curious about the math...or about the semantics surrounding the math...according to my math, 70-75% of 186 is 130-139BMP...I just did .7X186 and .75X186....What's with all the subtraction and stuff, do you know?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is confusing. I used the Karvonen forumula, which is supposed to be the most accurate way to come up with heart rate percentages for traning. It helps you to find your heart rate reserve (max HR- resting HR) and bases rates on that, so it's not as simple as just 70% of max HR. Check out this link: http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/heart-rate-reserve.html

      Delete
    2. Hi, good txt, thanks a lot.
      One observation, that might be confusing:
      when you say
      "70% – 75% of Max (this is the zone where you do recovery and long runs): (Max minus resting HR) x .70 + (Resting HR). For me, this would be (186-51) x .70 + (51) = 145 to 152 bpms. "
      you actually mean of 70%-75% of the HR reserve, not of Max.

      if you check that in the above original txt it will be more clear to all :)









      Delete
  23. These are the exact 3 fears I had of heart rate monitoring. I'm so glad you posted this information. Thank you! One question, what is your target heart rate for a race? If you are using heart rate training to increase speed, does that just come with time/increased fitness?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess that is 2 questions, my bad.

      Delete
    2. Runners World says rates should be:

      5K 96% HR Max
      10K 92-94% Max
      Half Marathon 85-88%
      Marathon 80-85%

      The aerobic capacity comes from slow running and the speed comes from doing tempo/interval runs on "hard days"

      Delete
  24. I totally buy into doing it. And yet, here I sit, still haven't done it. Why not? B/c then I couldn't run with my friends. Stupid, I know, but it's the trade off I make. I guess at this stage in the game, I put my priority on running w/ them vs. lowering my times! Tradeoffs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I get that. That's a total problem that I'm trying to figure out. I might do my tempo runs on days I am with friends or something like that. It really does isolate you - I can't even run with Ken anymore! I'm hoping it will be kinda short lived.

      Delete
  25. I tagged you in a post. I hope you can participate.
    http://runkwrun.blogspot.com/2012/08/i-was-tagged-for-liebster-award-by.html

    ReplyDelete
  26. This is really a great post. I'm 37 years old and have a max heart rate of 195. So high for my age. My resting is 60. I've been wearing a HR strap for about a year now and capture all the data but have always felt like I run my runs too fast. But this post actually really cleared up a lot of questions I've had. Some of them I'm running too fast but others I'm pretty darn close. Thanks Beth! This was a really good one. I really look forward to an update post later on.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I'm new to running (2 months) but after suffering an injury so early on (tendonitis in my gluteus medius) I know I have to do something to slow myself down. I've been researching hr monitors, and I think I'll bite the bullet on a Garmin FR-60. Ugh, this "inexpensive sport" has been costing me a pretty penny! Anyway, your post was timely and reiterated to me that I need some sort of external gauge to keep myself in check.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Lady I would say you fucking got this. Lesson learned.

    I love HR training. It keeps me honest during the summer months when it is 105* down here and then I see the gains in the fall/winter/spring when that same HR has me 2 minutes per mile faster.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Have you been spying on me? I have just been browsing books and talking to my coach friend who created a training plan for me that has all these "heart rate zones" included.
    I have never used a HR monitor because I don't know how!
    This is an excellent post. I think you may have hit on something with the injury thing. I am desperate to go more than a few months without an injury so I think I shall get me one!
    Although my latest injury can't be blamed on HR zone....I torn my plantar fascia a couple of week ago jumping over a snake on a run! I SWEAR it was a (baby) rattler. Now my triathlon season is done two races too early....Here is my little pitty party part of the post!

    Kim

    Thanks for reading. Please keep writing

    ReplyDelete
  30. I began heart rate training about 5 months ago. I LOVE it. It makes so much sense to me. And I find it easier to figure out cross-training.

    ReplyDelete
  31. This is great. I have been running by heart rate for about a year and a half now (using that same RW article you linked as a starting point) and I have seen a huge improvement in my paces. Although I also started running with groups within the past year, and learned more about how to do intervals and tempo runs properly. BUT, I am rarely sore from running anymore, even after long races or track workouts. And (knock on wood), I've never been injured. Plus, running by heart rate has taken all of the guesswork out of running through the summer. I don't have to figure out how much to slow my pace, I just keep targeting the same HRs and my body figures it out. AND, I don't beat myself up when my pace is "slow." That's just the best pace my body could do for that workout.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Also, I created this chart awhile back using that RW article: http://bit.ly/heartratechart. You just put in your age and it automatically gives you suggested heart rates.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for that chart! I think your comment summed up perfectly why HR training can be so effective and "safe."

      Delete
  32. Great info! I have a HRM, but not one on my Garmin. That will be my next purchase when this one bonks out.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I'm back and forth on this topic. I understand the theory behind it and can see how it works. But my heart rate is all over the place, never really found my max. And my "I feel good" heart rate during a run is in 180s, that can't be good. Maybe I should get it properly measured.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Heart rate training changed my life. Except I was too lazy to spend 42 cents and do annoying things like math to figure out my heart rate, so I went to a sports performance center where I live (Phase IV in LA) and did the VO2 test on their treadmill, which they used to determine my zones and spit out a printout of a fancy new running program for me and Presto! Took a full minute off my pace and haven't been injured since.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Very nice post. I'm with ya'. I didn't try heart rate monitors for a long time. Now I'm hooked!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Thank you..I have to say this is the most informative and accurate post I have come across regarding high heart rates during exercise. I was one of those confused why my heart rate was always so high. I could not get my HR below 165 at my slowest jog and that was after running for 3 years. Had a New Leaf metabolic test done to find my stats (max HR, VO2max, etc.) and they put me on a treadmill workout that about killed me. 4 days on treadmill keeping HR at 130,135,140,145 respectively for 12 weeks and now I can jog with a HR below 150.... the only reservation I have with the post is how one finds their max relative to a metabolic test would find max... I was able to get my HR over 200 when running but the metabolic test rated my max HR at 174...

    ReplyDelete
  37. Enjoyable read. Thanks for posting this.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Just finished Finding Ultra by Rich Roll and was searching online to find data to support Rich's heart rate training... your blog popped up. I completely buy the "Grey" area training mentality. Guilty as charged! . Reading Rich's text it sounds like all he did was run at a heart rate of 140 and over time he got faster and built his lactate threshold. This is what I am trying to research... Is that it, run at 140? He does not mention dispersing in speed intervals or faster races. Is he stuck at 140 no matter what the cost... stick to the plan? Or do you think he drops in speed once a week? Or for Ultra distances does he care about speed? Would love your insight... thanks for posting your thoughts above! Dan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you ever find answers to your questions? I had the same questions with no luck finding answers. I even wrote to Rich at his site but no response.

      Delete
  39. Really well done. Good job. Thank yo

    ReplyDelete
  40. Informative blog,I must say.I really gathered a lot of knowledge after read this blog regarding athletic department.Good work.
    http://www.apparelnbags.com/athleticwear-athletic-shorts.htm

    ReplyDelete
  41. Potong Pasir MRT at the doorstep, residents can easily access almost to any destination through.
    the interlace condo

    ReplyDelete
  42. which book do you like best? i notice this is written last year. are you still training with her HR monitor. I have been running with a garmin for years and have never used a monitor. i just bought a polar watch (i am a spinning instructor and it is able to link up to the monitors) and am looking to get into HR trainign for biking and running. was just curious as to your thoughts now a year later and which book was best!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Used MAFF training to BQ in 2011

    ReplyDelete
  44. Used MAFF training to BQ in 2011.

    ReplyDelete
  45. This will surely a productive element that you ave shared.I really appreciate this.

    http://www.apparelnbags.com/champion/index.htm

    ReplyDelete
  46. Great article, just hearing someone else in the same boat as you really helps. I'll now change all my workouts to HR zones from now on! Thank you :)

    ReplyDelete
  47. Sure now a day’s everyone had same problem and don’t know how to face it. This is the right post to overcome the problem.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Oh, #3 indeed. I have trouble going that slow. This article is so perfect for knowing I am not alone in trying to use a heart rate monitor to improve as well as frustrated with the judgments around my pace. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Please, could you let us know how the HR training has gone for you since you posted the article in August 2012? Has it made you a better, faster runner? Do you still stick to HR training methods? It would be very valuable to know and better than lots of guesswork and speculation!

    ReplyDelete
  50. I'm all about Heart Rate training, and I'm all about people doing the fancy math for me. The Garmin ForeRunner 235 watch has been pretty awesome for me so far. Calculates zones for me which are pretty dang close to what I had calculated during a maximal exercise test, and obviously its really cool to have it display on my wrist for me. https://goo.gl/TYs3PH

    ReplyDelete
  51. A good informative post that you have shared and appreciate your work for sharing the information.smallbusinesscoaches.net |

    ReplyDelete
  52. I really loved reading your blog. It was very well authored and easy to understand.accidentdamagedcars.net |

    ReplyDelete
  53. Your site is really nice and unique. This is one of the best idea that you had come up for the children and I do hope that they can have better future. www.home-page-builder.net |

    ReplyDelete
  54. This is a smart blog. I mean it. You have so much knowledge about this issue, and so much passion www.computercadsoftware.net |

    ReplyDelete
  55. Things are very open and intensely clear explanation of issues. Was truly information. Your website is very beneficial. Appreciate your sharing.5accuhealth.net |

    ReplyDelete
  56. Always thinking to do the same thing again and again , i am very thankful that i found this one..www.icomputerdenver.org |

    ReplyDelete
  57. الاول خدماتها تغطى جميع انحاء المملكة فهى افضل شركات التنظيف بجدة ومكة والرياض وينبع والاحساء والدمام نتميز باننا نوفر افضل العماله المدربة الماهرة نقدم تنظيف منازل وخزانات وبيوت وفلل وشقق ومجالس وسجاد وموكيت
    شركة تنظيف خزانات بجدة
    شركة تنظيف منازل بالدمام
    شركة نقل اثاث بينبع
    شركة تنظيف خزانات بينبع


    شركة تنظيف بمكة
    شركة تنظيف بالقطيف
    شركة تنظيف بالاحساء
    شركة شراء اثاث مستعمل بالرياض

    ReplyDelete
  58. تعد الاخلاص افضل شركة تنظيف ومكافحة حشرات بالطائف فهى تقدم افضل الخدمات وباقل الاسعار لانها تتميز بانها افضل :
    شركة رش مبيدات بالطائف
    شركة مكافحة حشرات بالطائف
    شركة تنظيف خزانات بالطائف
    شركة تنظيف بالطائف

    ReplyDelete
  59. Hello, i am glad to read the whole content of this blog and am very excited and happy to say that the webmaster has done a very good job here to put all the information content and information at one place.www.e-homebuyingforum.org |

    ReplyDelete
  60. I just read your blog and get the information which searching everywhere. Now it’s become on my top preference of reading for acquiring the updates without hassle.www.business-pictures.org |

    ReplyDelete
  61. I must say that while reading your post I found my thoughts in agreement with the topic that you have discussed, which happens very rare.keywestwedding.org |

    ReplyDelete
  62. Superbly written article, if only all bloggers oered the same content as you, the internet would be a far better place..Auto Nomyla |

    ReplyDelete
  63. Its a great pleasure reading your post.Its full of information I am looking for and I love to post a comment that "The content of your post is awesome" Great workTravel Prescott |

    ReplyDelete
  64. Thanks you for another great article. Where else could anyone get that kind of information in such a perfect way of writing? I have a presentation next week, and I am on the look for such information.Sunny Technical Services |

    ReplyDelete
  65. I surprised with the analysis you made to make this particular publish incredible. Wonderful activity! Old Stone House |

    ReplyDelete
  66. Positive site, where did u come up with the information on this posting?I have read a few of the articles on your website now, and I really like your style. Thanks a million and please keep up the effective work. The Seed Home |

    ReplyDelete
  67. Hey there! I just got a heart rate monitor and have been doing some research. Everything you say resonates with me! My goodness have I been running slow this week! Do you ever update for how quickly you saw progress? Or do you care to share? I know it is different for everyone, but I'm as clueless as you were! Are we talking days/weeks/months/years before I'm not running in mud for my slow runs? Ha! Thanks for the awesome blog. I'm adding you to my Feedly!

    ReplyDelete
  68. I closed my eyes after reading this blog. What amazing feeling. I wish to experience even 1 time. Thanks for your sharing. Click Here

    ReplyDelete