Thursday, October 18, 2012

I’m Going To Turn Around and Slap You

Does anyone else struggle with what the hell to wear when you run? I don’t mean - should I wear my kilt or my sequined thong – I’m talking what to wear so I will not be:

  • too cold
  • too hot
  • too sweaty
  • too annoyed by things rubbing
  • too confined

{When I first started running, I was so clueless about what to wear in different temperatures, so I used this cheat sheet from Runner’s World.}

Today I thought would be a slam dunk. It was to be in the mid 40s to 50s. Sunshine. We would be on the trails and climbing a ton. My rule of thumb is to dress like it’s 10 degrees warmer than it actually is and add in a couple more degrees for the climbing and sunshine. Basically, this meant I was dressing for 60-ish degree weather. Make sense? You have to be really smart and good at math to be a runner.

We drove a few miles outside of Boulder and realized I forgot two things in my calculations:

1. We would be starting at about 6,000 feet.

2. The beginning of the hike is really exposed because you start at the top of a mountain and that can mean wind.

We got up there and it was gusting to the point where little dust tornadoes were firing up all over the parking lot. I knew I’d be in trouble because I wouldn’t be warm enough. I hate the wind, but I almost hate being cold more.  I was proud of myself for throwing a pair of Target gloves in my bag last minute. But, truthfully I just wanted to stay put with my ass planted on those heated seats.

Joie and I had to troll around her car for some layers of things we could put on. She found a long sleeved shirt for me, and stylish flower cap not unlike this one.

Just kidding. It didn’t look like that at all, but that would have been funny.

After we got out of the exposed part of the mountain, I got hot, of course.  Mostly because we were climbing so many mother eff’ing hills (and a few stairs – who put those on the trail)?

IMAG0894

This was when I had to strip down and tie things around my waist (HATE that) and tuck my hat in my underwear except I wasn’t wearing underwear, so figure that out.

IMAG0892

BTW, this was a really ugly run with no scenic views and tons of crowds of people.

Next time I’m going to hire a doula or…what’s the right term? Oh, yeah, Sherpa, to carry my clothes when I don’t need them. This running hobby is getting expensive.

That looks about right with my toilet paper, jackets, protein bars and tampons.

Overall, a great run. It was the same one we did last week, only we did it in reverse. It was MUCH harder this way. 1,700 feet of climbing over 7.5 miles. I did not poop or even have to poop on this run, which was amazing and refreshing, especially because I forgot the TP.

One pet peeve – when we were almost done we passed a group of hikers, about 8 of them with their walking poles. I gave them a warning as I came up from behind and said, a nice “thank you” and “good morning.” But, NOOOOOOOOOOOOO – no one so much as mumbled a hello. I just don’t get it. Some day I am going to turn around and tell someone, “Never mind, I take my good morning back you big fat turd.” That will show them.

Do you ever have a tough time dressing for the weather when you run? Maybe it’s just me.

Ever want to slap someone when you are running past them and they don’t return a nice nod, good morning or hello? I dare you. It would make for a good blog post, but I am too chicken.

SUAR

58 comments:

  1. #1 I now have an awesome mental image of you running with a doula.

    #2 I KNOW! Say hello, folks, it isn't that hard. Especially since they're not running, they have no excuse, it isn't as if they're winded...

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  2. How rude! I hate when I don't get a hello back, mostly because I feel embarrassed and in need of reassurance. I'm very sensitive, apparently.

    I might die on a run like that but it might be worth it for those incredible views!

    I'm reading Gold right now and I'm really enjoying it! It got me through the most boring morning at jury duty.

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  3. As soon as I think I have the dressing thing down, I totally miss the boat on something. And I hate tieing stuff around my waist.

    Not saying hello or good morning is my number one peeve. I just tell myself that it's their loss.

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  4. Ok - totally hate figuring out what to wear for a run! These are my major challenges: boobs - usually have to wear two bras to keep them in place and then I get the ugly compressed uni-boob look; I live in Arizona - I just trained for my marathon in triple digit heat and running just about every afternoon...long runs started at 3-4 AM on Saturdays...you wear as little as possible and still smell when done!; I live in Arizona - WTH am I gonna wear for my marathon next weekend in DC?! I can't fathom this! Now I will have to pack a bunch of stuff - mainly stuff that I haven't trained in all summer because it's been over a 100 degrees every time I have run!!

    Oh yeah...I hate it when you nod or say good morning to someone and they ignore you. It almost makes me feel like I should be sorry for having said it in the first place... :(

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    1. Haha...I live in DC and had the same problem when I raced in AZ last year.

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  5. My latest clothing worry is whether or not to wear the crappy old running clothes or my neat new matching running clothes - I run on my treadmill in my garage, mostly (because it's 4:30-5:00 in the morning and DARK). I know, FWP. That aside, it seems a waste to wear the fun stuff, even if it is super comfortable and fits great.

    I'm always afraid I'll be cold. Ha ha. I live on a tropical island, but it can get a chilly 50-60F in the early a.m.

    Once in awhile I run into a neighbor when I'm walking my dog in the dark before I run. They almost always say hello to my "'morning" which is nice. A couple times certain people haven't responded, so I popped off with and added "or not" as I walk by. Depends on my mood. They could at least nod in acknowledgement!

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  6. I don't have to worry about dressing for a run. We have 2 temps.....warm and too damned hot. I prefer to run solitary trails but when I run on pavement its a mixture of cyclists and and occasionally another runner Cyclists are ALWAYS friendly, but recently I ran into a female runner and her husband (on a bike) . I smiled and said hi and she gave me the biggest "eat shit" look. I was tempted to ask her if she needed help pulling the stick out of her butt, I knew I could outrun her if she came after me....

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  7. I have been reading your blog for some time now (love it) and have never felt compelled to leave a comment until today's mention of not getting a return hello. I run around McIntosh Lake 4-5 nights a week and pass the same old codger (probably my age) going the opposite direction at least 3 nights. I nodded, smiled, waved, whatever, for months before I finally gave up. I've given him the finger a few times and actually have fantasized about lowering my shoulder and plowing him over. Not sure why this stirs such strong emotions...but it does. Glad to know I'm not the only one.

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  8. Hate having to tie stuff around my waist, hate tugging and pulling at stuff that's too confining, hate when my shoes are tied too tight, hate when my shoes aren't tied tight enough, hate when my shorts ride up and I have to keep pulling them down (but be careful not to pull them off), hate being hot, hate being cold, hate the wind, hate the humidity...but will keep running! :-/

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  9. I'm always wearing a layer less than everyone else I'm running with... I usually run hot. So, for example, if I run in temps in the 50s, I'll be wearing shorts and a tank. 40s, maybe capris. I get hot more often than cold. However... I just did a Tough Mudder race and froze my butt off. It was horrible. I thought I could always warm up, as long as I was running, but apparently that's not the case.

    So... this might be TMI, but quit carrying tampons and use this instead: http://www.keeper.com/.

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  10. I absolutely hate it when I say "good morning" or something otherwise thought of as the "polite" thing to do and they do not even acknowledge with a nod! I usually say over my shoulder -"ok, nevermind!" I may get punched some day...but oh well..

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  11. no. I live in AZ. I sweat no matter what season or time of day.

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  12. I keep a running journal that includes temp, and clothing options as well as what I thought of the run. Really simplifies life!

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  13. When that happens I usually say "oh, that's okay…I'm sorry…I meant to say 'have a shitty day :)'" including the big cheesy, smiley-emoticon-esque grin.

    Just kidding.

    But seriously, where do we go to get hooked up with one o' them sherpas?

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  14. I live in Georgia and if the thought of it being under 60 for a run automatically sends off enough text between my running group that we could fill a book. And if there is a race involved it gets 10x worse.
    Lately I have really found that the arm warmers are a great solution to many of those in between runs. Generally my core warms up nicely but my forearms/ hands are still chilly. I pair them with a tank and can take them off if needed (and tuck into your underwear).

    As for people saying hi- if they don't say anything while running- I assume that it is because they are dying and can't or off in their own world.

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  15. Is that what they mean by the term a$$hat?
    Or should that have applied only to the hikers, not your actual hat?
    Eiter way, it's so terrible that you had such an ugly view, yet again... bet you wish you could run through endless Indiana cornfields, huh?
    I see a business opportunity for those sherpas. That's practically what I do for my husband, anyway, because he never has any pockets, so I carry all his crap when we run together. Which, with most of my running skirts, makes me look like a pack mule.

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  16. I LOVE some Walker Ranch...good stuff. Glad you are taking a friend with you - heard too many stories of mtn lion sightings on that trail.

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  17. it doesn't matter what I wear this time of the year...I'm either too hot or too cold!

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  18. I never have trouble dressing here. It's short and a T-short v. shorts and a jog bra. Booo. Sunday was 89 F and today was 84. dew point 6 million. No but really, I ran for 2 years here before I bought running tights.

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  19. I'm enjoying the tips on dressing. I've only run one morning (so far) when the temp was 60, and that was heaven! I really can't wait for winter when the temps may dip into the 50s! I've ordered my arm warmers and super-lightweight windbreaker in anticipation!
    I've encountered a few people who didn't acknowledge my greeting, but I always thought they were probably just as confused as I about proper runner-greeting etiquette. However, there are some people who are just plain rude, and I hope that my cheerfulness ruins their day!

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  20. Don't slap them; just fart in their general direction.

    I usually don't have much trouble dressing for weather, though there is a tricky spot about -10 C (14 F) where you have to be careful about dressing too warmly when it's sunny out.

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  21. The key is to not EXPECT a hello back. There are a hundred reasons why someone may not have replied to you, and you'll never know their life/ reasons. But your hello could have made their day, had a positive impact on theur day. Seriously. Say hi because you want to, period. Don't expect anything in return but appreciate it if something comes back. We humans are complicated beings :-0

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    1. Can't say I agree. When you reach out to make a connection, I don't think you should "expect" to not be acknowledged. It will happen sometimes, sure, but I don't think it should be the expectation.

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  22. ooh I HATE it when people don't say hi back! Can you say rude!?

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  23. YES. I have an impossible time with the clothes thing. Part of it is that I KNOW I will warm up, but convincing myself to wear limited clothing when it's 10-20 degrees outside is a challenge. I almost always end up overdressing.

    I too hate it when people don't acknowledge me. How can you look someone in the eye (or ass) and completely ignore them? Rude.

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  24. I had the opposite experience this summer when I was riding my bike. I zipped past a couple walking on the bike path, and the old man yelled "Boo!" WTF? Then he yelled more things at me, but I didn't hear what he said. I kind of forgot about it until I was on my was back (the route is a 30 mile loop, and I caught them about at the halfway point). They must walk really slow because I came upon them again, while I was going over a wide wooden bridge. The old man started screaming at me as I passed them, and I hit my brakes. But the bridge was wet and my back tire fishtailed, and down I went. The old man just started laughing at me and told me I deserved to fall. I asked him why he was so angry at me and he said I didn't say anything to him as I passed by. He stalked away while his wife helped me up. I told her I was sorry, but I didn't understand why he was so angry. She told me it is courtesy to call out to people when you pass them. As I rode on, I told him I felt sorry for his wife, and he told me he felt sorry for me. Whatever!

    So I've been paying attention to this supposed concern, and you know what? Hardly anyone greets me when they pass me, whether running or biking. I don't know if people are rude or just in the zone. It doesn't bother me, but holey moley, did it bother him.

    Sorry this is so long, but I guess I learned a lesson here, and so I always do "the nod" to fellow bikers or runners, and say hi to walkers. I don't always get a reply. But I don't take it personally.

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  25. How about your feet? Have you ever run in flip flops? Read this story about the guy who ran the Baltimore Marathon this weekend in flip flops and finished in 2:46:58!

    http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2012/10/18/man-runs-entire-baltimore-marathon-in-flip-flops/

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  26. Hate running in heat. Can't strip off what you don't put on to begin with. Love running in the cold. Just hate getting my a$$ outta that nice toasty bed, especially on the mornings my DH is still in the bed. Hate tying things to my waist, but it's better than buying new clothes every time I run. Thought about asking nieghbors if I could stuff excess clothes in their mailboxesbut it's bad enough I have a half dozen or so let me stash waterbottles.
    I don't stress over the hello thing. To many times I've been the one who was totally focused on running and did not respond. I'm NOT going to turn around and say sorry I didn't see you. And I don't expect any body else to respond when I do see them and nod. They are probably paying attention to cadence or form or just convincing themselves they really can move one more step faster than the last time they ran. Get over it. If I'm not focused on MY run I'm risking a broken neck on these trails.

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  27. OK this morning wasn't the right morning to be in 5fingers, but I aways run my morning runs in 5fingers... it was 10 degrees C and raining... as for the rest of me, shorts and a hat... never were a shirt. (OK in races I do)

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  28. I have two. 1)Not getting out of the way and moving to the left when I say "On your left" and 2) I run with my dog for companionship, protection, and to wear the little sucker out. Others with dogs do not understand that when I move so that my dog is on the outside of us. They try to get the dogs to meet. Sorry, but my dog is WORKING. Also don't like people who try to pet him as we pass. It distracts him and he drifts into me.

    I hope you realize how lucky you are to be in an area that has so many places to run. I am so jealous! My area in Georgia enjoy their tubby custard and active trails or even sidewalks are too much to ask. If I wanted a path, I have to drive 30 minutes or more.

    Rant off

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    1. I run with my dog too and I feel the same way! People don't get it. Sometimes if someone and their dog don't move out of the way, or their dog is off leash I need to stop and walk because my dog will get distracted and drift into me (otherwise I'll trip over him). So annoying!

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  29. I think maybe you are just my doppleganger (is that the right word?)in another state! HA! When I read your posts I think that's me exactly, except my ass is lazy and I'm sick of running!

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  30. My rule of thumb is 20 degrees warmer - I haven't had to remove or add clothes in years. I may start off a bit cool, but within a half mile I'm good as gold. Last week my husband even said, "what is your temperature rule...? I can never get it right." Smart man. Probably just wanted to make out and that was his way of flirting. Whatever, it worked.

    If no one says "hello" back to me I then say it louder as I'm running on by in a high-pitched-sing-songy voice "Heeelllloo-oooo!!" That makes all my running partners very proud. It can also be adapted for "good morning" and "hi". Very creative.

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  31. Once I was hiking in a place known for bird watchers. Our group had a dog (on a leash, but that didn't stop the bird watchers from giving us dirty looks) and as we walked by, the group of bird watchers would not get off the trail (with all of their gear) so we were trying to step around them. I was saying, just above a whisper, as we all gingerly walked by, "Good morning, pardon us." We got past them and one turned to the other and said, loudly, "DID YOU JUST CALL US BIRD NUTS???"

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  32. I'm kind of introverted - sometimes I feel a little anxious about a run on a busy trail because I'll have to say hi to lots of people. I convince myself to smile at everyone I pass by pretending I am going by a race photographer and I have to practice pasting on a big smile even when I'm not feeling so hot.

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  33. I started running at the local park when I started training for my half marathon, so I'd be close to the bathroom if I needed it :)...usually there are 10 or so people I pass and at least half won't respond when I say good morning....really annoys me

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  34. I totally hear ya on the not knowing what to wear stuff. I would say I get it wrong about 40% of the time. I hate being too cold. It's tough in CO because even if it's 50 degrees it depends on the wind and if the sun's out or if you're going to be in the shade, etc.
    Also, I hate when people don't say hi or acknowledge you! I think it's so rude. I run on trails 100% of the time, so I experience this a lot. Sometimes I'm pushing myself pretty hard, so I can't muster a "hi", but I always make eye contact, smile and lift my hand as a subtle wave.

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  35. This made me think. If a person came up behind me, I'd be more apt to jump (I startle quickly), or say "oops! sorry!" rather than "Hello!" or "good morning!" But if a person is coming toward me, Then I agree - SAY SOMETHING! Even a smile! I don't understand when people can't even make eye contact. It's as if they don't know that I'm there. I want to yell "I'm over here!! You can't ignore me!!" Then again, I run on sidewalks of the Boston suburbs not beautiful trails. Still there are many times when it is just me and one other person. They have to hear me coming....

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  36. I hate the strip tease I do when running, especially when my headphone wires get in the way. Such a first world problem.
    We usually do a Christmas time reindeer 5k run, where we all show up for it dressed like it's -25, and we're all in shorts and tanks by the finish line. Thankfully, it's one of those double-back races, so we're all picking up our stuff at the end, right where we left it. Again, a first world problem.
    I find I can gauge the people out who are going to reciprocate if I say hello, simply by their eyes. If they glance up, but really concentrate on looking down, I assume I won't get a reply. Those are the folks I would like to be able to crop-dust on command. I usually just say hi to everyone and realize that most people just are totally intimidated by my rare charm and beauty (especially while running) and realize they don't have my *sparkling* personality.
    Amy P. Philly runner

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  37. Though the humidity is no fun, I love summer running because you never have to worry about what to wear. It's "as little as possible."
    No figuring out where to stuff items when you get hot. Just sweat it out.

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  38. I have the same problem with clothes! This morning it was chilly..ok, it was 59* which I'm sure is hot to you all in CO, but I went to the gym and wore shorts and a long sleeve Nike Dri-fit top to run and it was soooooooo hot! I don't want to wear a tank and I hate layers so it's frustrating!

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  39. It's like saying "bless you" when someone sneezes and they don't say thank you! May the devil be with you haha

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  40. I always wanna slap someone when I say "g'morning" because I made the effort and I'm not a morning person at all. I'm not trying to have a friggin conversation with you just being polite. Be polite people! It's not difficult, tho' then again, maybe it is. . .

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  41. It's not just you! I've been running for 14 years and I STILL can't get it right!
    I hate it when people don't return a greeting. It's so rude!

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  42. I have the hardest time when the seasons change, so basically in Fall and Spring. Because I find that even if it feels cold (or warm) I end up over/underestimating how much I should wear, and either being like "this is going to be a really cold run" or "man, I wish I had more layers on because it's too cold for just a running bra, and I can't take off these tights unless I want to be arrested for indecent exposure, but I'm freaking hot".

    I'm lucky that I live really close to the bike paths (or "multi-use" paths I think they are now called), so sometimes I'll run out for a couple of kilometres and if I need to turn back and get changed I can. I'd rather feel stupid for doing it, than being uncomfortable for an entire run.

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  43. When I run, its usually hot. Or gonna be hot. But the few times that it gets too chilly I have learned to carry one tube sock (yes, they still make them!). I can wear the sock on one hand at a time as needed. This sounds weird, I know, but I can stay warm as long as one arm is warm. Alright, that is weird. Anyway, the sock also makes a good nose-wiper, or, ah, for other things. And easily discardable or stowable as needed.
    I have, in fact, at the end of a long run and feeling particularly pissy, have "good morning"-ed someone and in the lack of their acknowledgement as I trotted by, turned around and screamed 'GOOD MORNINMNNNNGGGGG!!' in a way SURE to get thru the headphones she was wearing. There was still no response. I was still pissed. I didn't feel any better, so my advice is to just move along here. Now, when I run with my daughter and we encounter men of any age, I get a kick out of looking the man in the eye, while he is looking at my daughter, while she is avoiding looking at him. It's kinda funny.

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  44. I use the Runner's World cheat sheet all the time for deciding what to wear running and so far they've never failed me yet!

    Also, it drives me crazy when other hikers out on a trail don't at least return my hello. They just stare past and keep walking...I try to tell myself they're deaf and couldn't possibly be that rude. People are ruder the closer to the Twin Cities I am, which is why I prefer visiting State Parks the more rural parts of Minnesota.

    Bicyclists around my area are the worst about being rude, though. Not sure why that is.

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  45. I hate it when everyone says hi to me when I’m running! I’m out here to zone out, get my workout in and hopefully listen to music (if my ipod is working). This is my hour of the day without interruptions and having to say hi to everyone who passes just wears me out and I come home cranky. Also I agree with another comment above that you do not know that is going on in people’s lives. When my mom passed away it was all I could do to get through a run without bursting into tears let alone trying to say hi to everyone who passed me just to be polite!

    As for the hikers….I work hard when I hike. Walk fast and carry a decent weight (10-55lbs depending on what we are doing and how much gear is involved) in my pack. It is an incredible workout (and yes I get winded – not only runners get winded! What an arrogant assumption!) and again if it is a busy trail and everyone wants to say hi it wears me out. I came for some peace and solitude not to make everyone’s day! I try and find trails that are not well traveled but sometimes that is not possible. If it’s a trail where I haven’t seen anyone in miles I might stop and talk though.

    One of my pet peeves with runners is they think they own the right away on the trails and everyone should move over for them. Going uphill with a pack is hard work and most anything you read on trail etiquette is to yield to the individuals going uphill…not that I’ve ever had a runner do that to me but have done that myself on trail runs.

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    1. Dear Emily, You sound like an absolute treat to be around. One of "my pet peeves" are encountering people who take themselves and their activities so seriously that politeness is the first thing they choose to jettison. Mean people suck! Love always - Oregon Bob

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  46. I suck at deciding what to wear. I'm going to use the tip above and start recording that in my run journal. Maybe my skills will improve.

    But I had to comment because I laughed harder at this one than any other post. I was already giggling but the doula comment + sherpa pic/caption pushed me over the edge.

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  47. Doula, Sherpa, I love reading your blog. Not just because we share the same first name and running gi issues, but because you say the things I think all the time! I don't mind if someone doesn't say good morning back, but at least acknowledge that I exist and not with the dirtiest look possible please. I also struggle with running clothing choices and am trying to persuade the rest of my running group that they should not contact "What Not to Wear" on me. I live in Southeastern Texas and try to find the least amount of clothing that a forty something can get away with.

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  48. I'm no princess but I feel every pea....chafe...micro temperature increments etc....Truly hate being cold so I do the dress for 10 degrees warmer also and suffer for the first five minutes.

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  49. Sherpa? Where can I get one?? About the hi thing, it's just plain rude.

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  50. i thought the rule was dress like it's 20 degrees warmer than it is...that's what i do anyway.

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  51. haha friggin hilarious. i love your blog. sorry i'm just a lurker..

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  52. If it's sunny, I dress 30° warmer than the actual temp, if it's cloudy, 20° warmer. The best clothing I bought for fall/winter in the mid-south is a pair of baseball gloves and a neck gaiter. The gloves blocks the wind, easily stuff into my waistband, and are cheap if I lose them. I wear the neck gaiter on my head like a hat. It leaves the too of my head open to release heat, yet can cover my ears. As I heat up, I roll it down into a headband and just cover my ears, easily stuffs into my waistband, cheap too. Both are stuffed into my run bag at the first sign of cold weather.

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  53. I didn't know that it was too complex to choose something to run but there are some many gears out there that it makes it easier and comfortable to do so but we don't know much about it.

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