Saturday, February 16, 2013

Tell Me About Your Dog

Dog shopping like any kind of shopping has become completely overwhelming.

I can hardly decide on shampoo (moisturizing, triple volume, infused with Moroccan camel urine), or Oreos (birthday cake, double stuff, mint, vodka crème <in my dreams), or even toilet paper (triple ply, strawberry scented, reusable), so how the hell am I supposed to decide on a dog?

These days the choices are ridiculous with all of these hybrid breeds like Puggles, every kind of Doodle and Chi-weenies. Not to mention purebreds and mutts. What’s a girl to do? Maybe get a ferret.

It’s not like we’re getting a dog today. We’re not.  I’m still coping with the loss of this guy a couple of months ago:

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But, time does pass and your heart starts to open to the idea of another dog. I am still at the place where I don’t think I could love a dog like Lucky. But…maybe I could just love a dog in a different way. Maybe.

The kids update me everyday on all of the amazing dogs at the humane society. Today we visited and I found myself drawn to the “imperfect” dogs like Lucky. Those dogs missing something, like Lucky was missing a leg and an eye. This lab, Max, was missing one ear and half of another. I loved him. Don’t you?

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But, it’s still a bit too soon, and with our spring break trip coming up, we need to wait a bit longer. And, I am just not quite ready.

I’ve done my research on breeds and was interested to see that Runner’s World actually posted a great resource on breeds of dogs and how they are suited for the type of runner you may be (this is just part of the chart, for all of it – go HERE):

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I am not set on getting a dog to run with. Many trails I run on don’t allow dogs, and lots of times I run on roads that might be too busy for dogs. But, I still like to think about having a four legged buddy to run with. Sometimes.

So, my questions to you are -

Do you have a dog and if so, what breed? Would you get that same type of dog again?

Do you run with your dog?

Which is better – puppy or an older dog (2-4 years)? Since I work from home, I could do a puppy. Just not sure I’m up for it. At least I won’t have to breast feed.

SUAR

134 comments:

  1. Lab, German Short Haired Pointer mix. Awesome, awesome dog. He runs with my wife and I - up to 6 miles so far. He absolutely loves it. He has learned what running shoes are and what the beep of the Garmin means. Can't always take him though and it breaks our heart to tell him, "No".

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    1. I wish I had seen this when it went up alas I had the Flu last week. Running with a Dog....I have a 7yo GSP as well and she is a dream to run with. Though that is as much to her disposition as it is to the amount of training she has received. Pay very close attention to what the dog you are looking at was bred for. For instance GSP's Vizslas and Weimaraners can be family dogs, in which case they will have a mellow disposition and though energetic might not be the best dog for long or spirited runs on the trail (especially off leash) or working dogs which are better suited to tasks and direction but need exercise regularly. My GSP, Muji is a gun dog fail from a long line of hunting dogs and as such takes direction like any working dog. She has no problems spending hours running, I have never found her off switch and short of carrying extra water and a collapsable bowl for her running with her is like running with the best pacer you could imagine. That said she needs to run for at least an hour 2-3 days a week (more is good) or she is (like me) unbearable. She is a much an athlete if not more than I am, I was sick the last week and unable to run she let me know that while she felt sorry for me she wanted to run, she even brought me my Trail shoes from the closet. This morning when I started putting on my running clothes she started vibrating, though she settled as soon as we hit the road. Road Running she wears a chain collar and I use an extending leash, its light provides her with some freedom and is easier to guide her than a fixed length leash. On the trail she wears an electronic collar, control her with a tone these days she was trained on one 6 years ago and is very obedient I keep a chain collar and a short leash in my pocket for whenever we run across too many people for her to move without scaring people. It works for us. I don't run without her, that would be cruel not to mention she needs it as much or more than I do. This means I don't go to trails that she can't run, which is OK most of those in my area as high Bird population which for her is a huge distraction and can be a problem. I would say get a puppy training a dog from day one to run with you is work but the sooner you start it the more enjoyment both of you will have. Another thing to watch it your dogs idiosyncrasies....Muji is terrified of horses and oddly sewer grates, the former is easy enough to deal with latter can be disconcerting, she knows where every grate is in the neighborhood so regardless if I can see them (like if they are covered in snow) she knows where they are and will not run within 6 feet of one; an issue if I'm not providing enough leash for her to move in front or behind me while we are running past one that I don't see...getting hip checked by a 50lbs dog because she won't run in seemingly open road can ruin your run in the blink of an eye. Some odd things I have noticed she's a shorthair and has to be moving to be warm (or cool for that matter) I keep a blanket in the truck to cover her with post run, I have an orange cape she wears during hunting season, In the summer I keep ice in a cooler for her to lick so she can cool off after a run. Her nose gets chapped in the winter so I put BagBalm on it a few times a week in the summer I put child safe sunscreen on it just in case. I grew up with Labradors and while I love them they aren't a running dog, I will never not have a GSP in the family too much good company.

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  2. I have a border collie/shepherd mix that runs with us all the time. Often does 10+ mile days at 9 years old. We adopted him at 8 years old and I work at an animal shelter, so I'm all for the older dogs.
    I write about running with my dog here:
    http://trailingtatum.blogspot.com/

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  3. We have a Jack Russell Terrier - Great HIGH energy dog that needs 5 miles a day of something. Headstrong, stubborn, absolutely loyal, cuddle bug who was a shelter dog. Not for everyone, but wouldn't trade the little fellow for anything. :-)

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    1. We have 2 and I totally agree!!! Love our JRTs.

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    2. My JRT is almost 14, he's the love of my life.
      He's almost blind, has kidney disease, heart disease, arthritis, and a host of lumps, bulges, and tumors, but we love his stinky little gross body.
      He required about 2-3 morning miles and about 3 night miles, walking, running, ball throwing (but not retrieving, only chasing) and lots of snuggles and cuddles still. We kept that up until he was around 10-11 years old. Now, he's perfectly happy sleeping all day, with the exceptional food/bathroom/drink/treat cycle, and lots and lots of belly rubs and even more snuggling.
      I would get ten more of them if I could!
      Amy P. Philly runner.

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  4. I have a dachshund, and he is a lot of fun... very high-energy too, so he would do well on short runs. The only bad thing about them is that they bark at everything.

    Personally, though, I think it is a really good idea to adopt a shelter dog! If I ever get another dog, that's what I plan to do. :)

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  5. We have a Doberman/Shepherd mix up (name is Guinness...like the beer) and he is an amazing dog. He's 2 and I haven't gotten him under control enough to run with me yet but I hope to soon. Max is adorable! You'll know when the time is right, and I know I don't have to tell you this, but definitely don't rush into the decision.

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  6. I have a Cocker Spaniel :) My previous dog was a Cocker Spaniel, which answers your question about getting the same type of dog again. I must be nuts because we are probably going to add an addition to the family which will be a Cocker Spaniel puppy. I thought about getting a dog from the Rocky Mountain Cocker Rescue but they have certain needs (or need to be in a one dog household) that I can't attend to because I don't work at home. Puppys are a ton of work and I to don't know if I am ready for that again but they will also crack you up as you find them in a pile of TP or doing some other puppy like thing that you just can't get mad at them about :)

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  7. I have two cats, no dog. But, if I was getting a dog it would be a young adult from a shelter. Most people aim to get a puppy. So many older dogs need homes too.

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  8. Ok, love the lab missing the ears. What a sweetheart.

    We rescued a Boston Terrier, and I am hooked on the breed for life. Super smart, low-shedding, minimal grooming, extremely loyal, great with kids, and so stinking cute. They are a great size - not huge but not tiny (and not yappy at all).

    Good luck with your choice. I am confident that no one will replace Lucky, but that you will definitely find a new place in your heart to fall in love with a new dog. :)

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  9. I was a middle aged cat woman until two years ago when we adopted a five year old black lab. He's my wonderful, loyal, protective, awesome trail running buddy. The rest of the family (hubby and two teenage boys) love him too. I would def. get another lab.

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  10. We have a Chihuahua, Goliath. He does not run with me but is great for cuddling. I would definitely get another one. He's pretty awesome.

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  11. I have a corgi/retriever mix who I trained to run with me last year. Started with a doggie version of Couch to 5k. Her distance "PR" now is 4.11 miles. We run a trail at a park and she LOVES it - and she knows where every puddle, lake, and creek is. She somehow knows when I'm getting ready to take her for a run vs me going to the gym or to run on my own. Once she's in the car, she squeals with excitement the whole ride to the park. When I stop for water at the car, if we haven't run far enough for her liking she won't stand near the car and won't even look at me. lol. She's become a running snob - no more walking for her!

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  12. I run the a lot before 6am when it's dark and wanted a companion. I googled best dogs to run with and came upon the same Runner's World list. We never had heard of a Viszla, so I did some research. My husband and I decided this would be the breed for us! Ozzy is currently 5 months old, I have been taking him on short runs for now. (2-3 miles) He is EXCELLENT on and off the leash. He's pretty fast now, I can't imagine his speed when he gets older! Not only is he a good runner, he's pretty darn cute!!

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    1. Try 25 mph. Thats how fast we've clocked our viszla at.

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    2. Try 25 mph. Thats how fast we've clocked our viszla at.

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    3. Wow!!! Maybe he'll get me running that fast! :-)

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    4. Vizslas are for people who definitely want a dog to run/hike with. I have 2. They are completely addicted to running. We've run thousands of miles together. They are my running partners. My weekly mileage is often higher than I need it to be, because the vizslas bully me into more miles! Definitely the greatest dogs in my opinion, but be warned about getting them addicted to running tons of miles. Good luck!

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  13. I have a Jack Russell and absolutely love him. They key with this breed is that you need to start them right, and they should always believe that if they step out of line you will rip them in half (not true but they can't know that). You have to be very black and white with them. This dog practically reads my mind. He wears a leash for others benefit but is 100% perfect without one. He does exactly what I want with a whispered word or a hand command and is a perfect little love bug. He's a great running dog and can sprint with the best. Most importantly, the tennis ball population in the area is well controlled!! If you are a confient handler with the time to invest in early education, these are wonderful dogs and very rewarding.

    I have also owned all types of others and the other standouts have been a rottie who was well bred and on the small side and a shelter dog who was a black lab/great dane... also surprisingly small. They were also mind readers.

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  14. We have an adorable Yorkie! I do NOT recommend this breed. We've had her since she was a puppy, and nearly 3 years later she is still not potty trained. Oh, she knows she is supposed to do her business outside... but she prefers to do her business indoors. It's just so much more convenient for her :)

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  15. We have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi (think the Queen's dogs). She doesn't have the health to run with me, and I'm not the type to pick up poop with a baggie without hurling. We love her and got her as a puppy. She's great with the kids and, on occasion, herds them...which is funny.

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    1. Another Melanie with a Corgi, yes, they are the best! I love my Brittany and run with him, but our PWC is my <3 dog.

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  16. I have a Labrador Retriever and I run with him. No further than 10km though and we built him up slowly to that. Mostly he just goes out for 5km runs with me though. In less than three weeks we're bringing home another Lab from the breeder. He'll be taught in the same manner. I will ALWAYS have a lab. Best.dogs.ever.

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  17. I run with my Brittany, Hazel. I am slow, he is tolerant. He is handsome and loves lap time, too. He likes running around on the farm, when not jogging with me, but is happy to nap his time away in his kennel when we aren't home. We've had Brittanies since I was a kid. I think you will know the right dog when you see it. I love puppies better than anything on the planet, but we have also adopted older dogs that were perfect in every way. Good luck!

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  18. We have a lab retriever we adopted when he was 7. He just turned 11 and has been amazing. I would def get a lab again. I love that you are drawn to the imperfect dogs, because they are the ones who probably won't get a happy home. My advice is find the dog that just seems right for you guys. You will know them when you see them. The other bit of advice that my sister gave me (and this was a huge part of what drew us to Hercules)is look towards the dogs that aren't barking when you come to visit at the shelter :-). I hope that helps some. :-)

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  19. labbie, great companion, served as a workout partner, outfield for shagging balls when the kids were growing up, devoted pal and member of the family, but then aren't all dogs? Love them all

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  20. We have 3 dogs.

    German Shorthaired Pointer (7 years) is the best runner. They are super hyper the first few years. Then they are selectively hyper. But she's a great runner!

    Blue Heeler (3 years) is the next best runner. And super sweet.

    Mutt Mix (aka shepard, lab, who knows what else) (3 years). She sucks at running. She's the token fat kid in the family. She literally does her best to trip us while we run. And shes super hyper and a pest a lot, but we love her anyways.

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  21. I have a rescue dog, and love her to bits. We got her at the rescue when she was four or five months old, and we chose her because she was the only one not barking at us, and she would turn herself inside out to get a little bit of love. She is now seven-ish, still doesn't bark, and has a huge heart. She is 100% pure mutt, our best guess is that she is Husky crossed with a herding breed (like an Australian Shepherd or something similar) and a Golden Retriever. Our first two dogs were purebred that we purchased from a breeder, but in the future we will most likely choose a rescue dog again. She loves to run, is fast as all heck, and will go forever - but sadly she isn't an ideal running companion for me... I am kind of new to running and lack confidence; I am always scared that she will see something and dart in front of me while I am running so I watch her instead of focusing on the run.

    I would suggest going to a shelter, and finding a lost soul there who speaks to you as our rescue "spoke" to us, you will know a match when you find it. I think a match in temperament is far more important than looking for a specific breed. My rescue had a rough start in life, and as silly as it seems, has always seemed to know how good she has it in our home(as opposed to the purebreds who seem to just "expect" it).

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    1. I have had a Poodle, Husky, Cocker Spaniel & a 100% mutt dog from the pound. I agree that the 100% mutt dogs are the best. My mutt was a Chow, Dachshun, Sprinnger, Terrier type dog. Long body, short legs, turned out knees, wire coat, very serious under bite...really homely.... but the best dog ever.

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  22. We have 4, all rescues, each serving a different purpose! A long haired chi for cuddling, a fat little weenie for warmth (we fight over him at night), a border collie/corgi mix for laughs (he has a huge overbite) and a lab/boxer mix for runs. The two larger one's we got as puppies. I am pretty sure at my age (45) I will never do a puppy again.

    On a different note, I got the collie/corgi mix shortly after a loss of dog that I loved more than I love children. I really thought I would never want another, would never be able to deal with the loss of another, or want to. But dogs are so amazing in the way that they love us. You can't help but heal. And since they are all different like kids, you never lose the love you had for one by getting another.

    I hope you find the right furbaby for your family!

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  23. I adopted Dakota from the local shelter when she was about 7 months old. She was already house-trained, but I didn't know that when I picked her out - total bonus! She's a Lab mix; maybe with Great Pyrenees or Bernese Mountain? Whatever she's a mix of, she's wonderful. Very laid back, great with kids and always up for a walk or trip somewhere. I'll take her with me for easy 3-4 mile runs, but that's about all she's up for unless there's a rabbit or squirrel to chase the entire way.

    I just did a dog-friendly trail race (Psycho Wyco Run Toto Run - highly recommend it!) and I think the majority of the dogs running the longer races were mixes of some sort. I'm all for shelter dogs, but I think finding the right dog is a matter of knowing it when you see it. I'd been to the shelter a few times and had thought about a few, but when I saw Dakota I just knew she would be my dog. Take your time, and, when you're ready, I wish you the best in your search!

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  24. Yellow lab here! And she runs w/ me on a trail, but hates to run on leash via road. She's more of a sprinter rather than longer distances (oooh, squirrel!). Labs live to run and play, so I highly recommend.

    We got ours as a 7 wk old puppy, and while lots of work, the puppy phase is awesome :)

    Good luck when you're ready.

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  25. We just adopted a kitty from the Humane Society and we also have a poodle-mix dog so we are set for now. I have pondered the idea of having a "running" dog since I am a woman and it might be nice for safety. However, I don't know if I want to have to always run the dog either. In the end, I truly believe keeping up with your local shelter and rescue groups - the right pet for you will eventually appear and you will know it. No pet ever replaces a previous one, we just open our hearts to love another :)

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  26. I have 2 puggles, one is a 7 year old sweet slug, very pugish. I wanted a dog I could run with and loved the puggle breed. I got another puggle, she is 2nd generation and more like a beagle. She loves to run and she loves people and other dogs. I would have loved to rescue a dog but I own a resort and needed to raise a dog around all the activity. Good luck with your search.

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  27. we have a mutt that was dropped off in our neighborhood and found her way to our back deck and wouldn't leave...she's part lab but no idea what else...she is the best dog!!

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  28. I'm a big fan of finding your perfect match through a rescue or shelter. Our Golden Retriever was 2 when we got her, she's 10 now and I wouldn't trade her for anything...even though she's most certainly a social butterfly, not a runner (will sit and wait if we pass anyone getting out of their car, opening their front door, etc. so she can get pats and love from whatever random stranger/maniac/door to door salesperson/child is nearby). We're looking for a second Golden now to join her, hopefully one who likes to run!

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  29. My old girls Raven (lab mix) and Jasmine (German Shorthair) ran about a million miles with me and helped me train for my first marathon in 2004. They are both gone now, tears as I write that. I am now joined on my runs by Ajax (Springer Spaniel from Denver Dumb. Friends) and Mica (Weim from Weimaraner Rescue). They may be perfect in breed but believe me, they have their imperfections coming from rescue. Today they got me to almost 8 miles, my longest run since coming back from an injury. I can't imagine not having my dogs to run with, and if the dogs can't go someplace then I don't run there, there are many miles of other places. And I swear by this : www.buddysys.com. from Chicks in Charge, how can you go wrong with that?

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  30. Love my Boxer who was a rescue, got him when he was 2 years old, and is a fabulous family dog, loves kids and adults alike. He LOVES LOVES LOVES to go outside for long walks. If I ran, he would probably love it. He doesn't bark, and has turned out to be a pretty good watch dog too, letting me know (I am single) when he hears an unusual noise or someone comes to the door. Consider a boxer, they are fabulous.

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  31. I would always go for a puppy because you know what his history has been. Older dogs from shelter may carry a lot of emotional baggage from past abuses and sometimes not even all the love in the world can get them past that. I have a golden retriever and he's been amazingly easy to train. Plus he's a bit of a clown and makes me laugh every day. He also loves to be brushed and cuddled and now that my kids are adults I can shower him with affection and not embarrass them in public. We haven't done much running together yet because he wasn't old enough when it was cool and summer in Brisbane is not the place to be running a dog. But my hope is that once it cools down he'll keep me company on runs.

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    1. Uncertainty to a dog's past, which is not his/her fault in the slightest, makes them undeserving to find a new home? Would you suggest they all be euthanized so people can have puppies instead?

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    2. We did puppy once. I will NEVER do it again. It was a great experience but I have found the best dogs to be my grown pound pups, even the one with no background history that was dumped and found living on the streets. Yes, we have some anxiety issues, but they are dealt with and part of our dogs personality. When it's time for another dog, we will be back at the shelter to find our next family member that needs a home.

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  32. I have a lab/bull mastiff cross. He is a big boy but a good running partner. My husband prefers me to take him with me if I'm running alone. I love the mastiff personality and would absolutely get the same kind again.

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  33. Both of our dogs were 4 months old when we got them. I think this helped with house-training (took 2 days for the first, and the second just kind of followed her along when we brought him home). Prudence is a bull terrier- she's a terrible running partner, but the absolute best dog in every other arena. Lovable, cuddly, happy, she's a little clown and so smart. She's a little on the small side for a bull terrier (47 pounds), but we'd get another one in a heart beat because she's just so fun. Matt, the second dog, is a Presa Canario. He's 110 lbs, but a wonderful running partner for short distances (5 miles and under). He's extremely obedient, loves to learn and do new tricks, and thinks cuddling is his job. He's also very intuitive about how we feel, and knows when we need a little extra love. If he weren't so huge, he'd be perfect.
    Both of them are great guard dogs, but at the same time, both of them are great with kids and exceedingly friendly. The funny thing about them is they are both breeds that get prejudiced against- people say they're bad with kids, bad with other dogs, etc, but if you saw our dogs, it proves the behavior lies more with their "parenting" than with just their genetics. My blog gets taken over by their cuteness some days because they're such lovers.

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  34. we have a female westie (west highland white terrier) and a male cairn terrier. the westie is stubborn but very smart and loyal. the cairn is sweet and funny. i would definitely have another cairn, but maybe not another westie (although i love her dearly). they are NOT good to run with. :) i have taken them on a one-mile run, and by the last quarter, i am practically dragging them down the street. we are in an apartment now, but when my hubby gets out of school and we get a house, we are definitely getting a big dog -- leaning toward a labradoodle or goldendoodle, which are supposed to be good dogs to run with.

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  35. After losing my 2 dogs last summer it took me a few months to be ready to open up my heart & home to another dog. We rescued a mini Australian Shepherd who turned out to b skittish & scared of everyone. I was just drawn to him & since I was a little afraid to become close to another dog. He warmed up to us & I fell in love w/him & I really think we rescued each other. He's a great fit to our family. You'll find your fit too. Don't rush it.

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  36. After losing my 2 dogs last summer it took me a few months to be ready to open up my heart & home to another dog. We rescued a mini Australian Shepherd who turned out to b skittish & scared of everyone. I was just drawn to him & since I was a little afraid to become close to another dog. He warmed up to us & I fell in love w/him & I really think we rescued each other. He's a great fit to our family. You'll find your fit too. Don't rush it.

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  37. My lab looks exactly like Max except that the only parts he is missing are his manly parts. We got him when he was 1 1/2. Some dope returned him to the breeder--not aggressive enough!! We adore him and he runs with me when I am someplace where he is allowed. Get the lab. Get the lab. Get the lab...

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  38. I have two dogs- a mini schnauzer and a weinaraner. The mini does great up to about 6 miles and he loves running. We've had him since he was a puppy and he is the most lovable thing. The weim is about 2 and she was a 'throwaway' dog that no one wanted. I'd had some scary things happen on a couple runs so I needed a big scary high energy dog. I found her at the shelter and with a little work she has become the BEST dog and running partner ever. She makes sure we got out almost everyday. :)

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  39. Best house dogs are mutts. What ever you decide on research the breed. Dogs were bread for a reason. Working dogs like Border Collies are meant to herd and are not happy unless they are rounding up the cattle or the kids :). Golden Retrievers are great pets. They love everyone but are prone to hip problems. we had Chesapeake Bay Retrievers.Very loyal and great pets but bred for retrieving. So high maintenance.( yes i would have another Chessie in a minute) Study the breed and choose the best dog for you!

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  40. My lab mixes are my running buddies - they are on leash attached to my waist so if anyone messes with me they're getting all three of us. They both were from a shelter and I took my time finding both of them - I think they chose me as much as I chose them. I certainly know that I'm the one who was rescued as they rescue me from life, daily. When it's the right time and the right dog, you'll know. It won't ever be like Lucky, but you'll love it just as much. I promise. :)

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  41. Triple ply toilet paper? My, that sounds wonderful.

    I'd add my dog input but you've already heard everything, ever so I'll just say yay for dogs!

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  42. I have a Sheltie and a shepherd/Akita mix. I've gone running with both of them, but mostly in cool weather because they both have very thick coats. The shepherd mix is about 75 pounds and her endurance is a little better than my Sheltie's, but both of them love to run. I think it's easier to train a puppy because no one else has allowed them to have bad habits, but puppies are also so much work...you turn your back for two seconds and they've chewed up something. If you get a puppy, get a crate. Crate training is your friend and it provides your dog with a nice den that's its safe spot. Good luck with your decision!

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  43. We've got a 4 yr old chocolate lab and a 10 mo old silver lab (got her at 7mo). Ive ran with Sara and she does ok for about 3 miles and then wants to stop (and I'm not a fast runner). Hoping to get May out there as soon as it warms up. I didnt want a puppy puppy because I remember house training Sara and wasnt ready for that. May wasnt really housen broken either as her life consisted of the crate n a yard. Still cant get her to go on the leash yet. Good luck finding the perfect furry friend.

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  44. I highly recommend giving an OLDER dog a chance. Puppies (even at the humane society) are snapped up while older dogs can sit and sit and a shelter is no place for a dog.

    We have a black lab and a beagle, both great dogs.

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  45. I totally, completely disagree with the opinion that older dogs from shelters are unstable and that you HAVE to know a dog's history. Shelter dogs can be so so so loving and grateful for a nice home.

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    1. I agree. We adopted a 6 year old lhasa apso last year and he is very well behaved and extremely loving. He did have some abandonment issues, but even those are almost gone.

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    2. I agree, too. I used to run a homeless animal shelter and brought in/adopted out hundreds of dogs of all ages. You absolutely do not have to know a dog as a puppy or even know his history to know (and love) a dog!

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    3. I agree! We have a shelter dog that was found living on the streets, we have no history on him and he is a great dog. He's not too sure about you when you come to the house, but when you are invited in he is fine and will want to play with you. He was around 3 years when we got him and he's now almost 6 years. Aside from some understandable severe seperation anxiety, he is a really good pup.

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  46. I have a border collie and a jack Russell terrier. They are both amazing. I don't run with them because they are older , 11 and 9. I think border collies would be great to run with. Both are very loving and always aiming to please. Plus they have never snapped at our 4 year old twins.

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  47. BORDER COLLIES!! My 4 yr old could run forever or at least to the next town if I let her. We both have an addiction to trails simply because I let her run off leash and she run right along my side. I have a 4 month old as well and she seems to be headed in the same direction. Right now I am running 2 miles at a time with both of them so they can practice running on either side of me and move aside when told too for when ever the trail narrows. Puppies are a huge amount of work, especially borders since they require alot of time and exercise. They are, however, VERY smart and easily trained. I would not own any other breed. Good luck! You will know when it is time to open your heart up again.

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  48. OMGosh, I love that Max! What a handsome boy! He just looks like he'd love to run.

    We have a shelter dog, Tessa, that we adopted when she was about 12 weeks old. (She's now almost 3.) They had her momma there too, and they think she's a black lab, border collie mix. Best personality, super good with the kids and kitties, and loves people. I really want to start taking her running with me this year and get her used to it. Not just the distance, but the people and other dogs, etc. We live on 5 acres so I've never really taken her out and about as she has lots of room to run and roam. I think it'll take her some time to get used to, but she's super smart and I think she'd be a quick learner. I sure hope so because she's 65lbs and could just about drag me off!

    I would whole-heartedly vote for getting an adult mixed breed shelter dog! Less health problems than a pure breed and somehow they end up with the best personalities and so thankful to be part of a family.

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  49. I grew up with Australian shepherds so it's the only dog I'm really used to being around. We adopted our current dog from the shelter when she was already a couple years old -- it was SO nice to not have to go through the puppy phase!! I have never had to handle a puppy on my own, but I can already tell that I am NOT up for that.

    I like to run with my dog. It makes me feel a lot safer. She is a super friendly dog with everyone, but she is really protective when she thinks I might be in danger. The downside to having a shepherd is because she is a herding dog, she's more of a sprinter and not so much into the long, sustained efforts. But she still loves to run with me because her goal in life (even more than acquiring tennis balls and cats) is to please her family. Aussies are incredibly smart - my dog knows when we are going running (I think she recognizes my running shoes) and she knows exactly how to behave (no wrapping herself around poles and trees, stopping to sniff, etc.). Once you get an Aussie leash-trained (which takes almost no time at all!), you've got an exercise buddy for life!

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  50. We had a shih tzu we loved dearly. She was on the bigger side (not fat) at about 16 lbs and could run 3-4 miles no problem. She was extremely affectionate and loyal. She passed away a year ago on Valentine's Day. We now have an adopted lahasa apso (I never remember the spelling). The breed is closely related to the shih tzu, but he has a longer torso and longer legs which means he runs faster. He is also extremely affectionate.

    In the end, you can't go wrong with whichever breed you choose as long as you give the dog the time and love it needs.

    Post pics when you find your puppy!

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  51. We have an old, fat, lazy beagle... and just adopted a 2 yr. old Doberman. I would recommend the Dobie for you because they are SUPER SUPER loving (they're not called 'velcro' dogs for nuthin'), sweet, goofy, playful and are FAST... yep, I don't run with our Duke because he's about 3 minutes per mile faster than me on my best day. They're very active and need exercise, but aren't way hyper. Also, they scare away bad guys, even though they don't deserve their unsavory rep. They're perfect!! Good luck in your search!

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  52. I have a black and a silver lab, both great workout buddies. I love the fact that you embrace the imperfections...lab with the missing ears looks like a sweetie.

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  53. Hi Beth, sorry to hear about Lucky. We visited Longmont Humane Society for several months until we found the perfect dog, I think you've probably met her. She's a lab pointer mix, she was six when we adopted here. She runs with Kim and aside from the constant pursuit of food, she's awesome! When you get a dog, bring her over a play date with Allison.

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  54. Omg I love Max! We have a chocolate lab, Joby, who is totally my running buddy! Labs are stockier than some of the "distance dogs" that Runners World mentioned, but he runs 14 milers with me, and could probably do more! Just like a human, it is all about conditioning. LIke the first poster said, he also recognizes running shoes, running tights and the Garmin.

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  55. I want a husky or something fluffy like that but my friend has a border collie I wouldnt mind running with.

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  56. I started running.... because of my dog! She is a 40# belgium malinoise/cattle dog mix. She has the energy of 100 enerigizer bunnies and the smarts of a mensa member. She was sooooo easy to train, I had her sitting in 5 minutes after literally picking her up off the streets, but we quickly learned we needed to channel that energy and give her a job. So she became my running buddy. She is now 8 and trucking along better than ever. She and I run on trails, busy streets, parks, neighborhoods, even races that allow her.

    I would highly recommend a dog to run with, it is a GREAT built in safety feature. And she is happy and ready to go no matter the time or place.

    Take your time, something will find you! I love love love that you are attracted to the "special needs" pets. We have 3 cats who all were saved from precarious situations. Good luck, be patient with yourself!

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  57. I have had lots of labs. I love the breed. They are smart, easy to train, energetic, can go for miles,love water, love to be part of the family. THe bad- they are energetic especially so as pups, they chew as puppies. They are a working dog so they need mental and physical stimulation which is ok for our family. I have mostly gotten puppies as I love training them. I don't think you could really go wrong with whatever breed or route you decide to go. All options have pros and cons. I run with Gus sometimes, he can go for miles.....on leash he really isn't running, it is more like a fast trot for him and off leash he paces himself.

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  58. Two rescue dogs...5yo black lab/shepherd mix and a 13yo chow pei mix. We did doggie DNA testing or we would still think we had an aussie mix and a border collie mix. Have tried to run with the younger dog but her random detours to chase lizards and squirrels tend to threaten life and limb


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  59. I have a Coton de Tulear....they are expensive, but they are totally the best dogs ever. No shedding, very affectionate and smart. They're little, but mine does like to run...only about 3 miles at a time. Seriously, the best dog you will ever own. Look them up!!

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  60. I got a lab/husky/shepherd mix from Petfinder.com .... he was born and fostered in Arkansas but they arranged the transport to get him to New England. I couldn't be happier. Knowing that he could have ended up on the streets or put to sleep makes me love him all the more.

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  61. It's been 2 years since I lost my dogs and I still didn't feel completely ready...but a little guy was in great need and it just happened. He became my next dog. I cannot tell you how wonderful it is. I know your pain and your sadness. A next dog helps, trust me. He/she doesn't replace the one whose gone but just brings that wonderful dog-ness back into your life. That dog Max, the one with the missing ear who you loved at the Humane Society...think really hard about loving him as part of your family. You need him. And he needs you. Chances are great that no one else will love him because of those missing ear(s). I'm a big believer in who rescued who...you and Max are meant to be. Your heart brought you to the Humane Society for a reason. Sadly, he may not be there if you wait too long to go back. There are lots of great boarding kennels and pet sitters in Boulder to cover your Spring Break trip ;)

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  62. You will never feel 100% ready because of pain and fear. Then you find your next dog and that all goes away. And you wonder how you survived so long without one in your life. I'm scared no one else will adopt Max because he is so "imperfect" and he will lose his life. You love him...go get him!! <3

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  63. I have a big old soft spot for Rottweilers. My big guy lived to almost 14 years. He was the gentlest, most loving, loyal, and smart, (oh so smart!) dog. And, Rottweilers aren't prone to senseless barking. I have 2 Rottie mixes now, both rescues. They're wonderful :)

    My little girl dog is definitely mixed with a breed that likes to bark. A squirrel farts outside and she hears it.

    Max is oh so cute! I could see how you were drawn to him.

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  64. I want a doggie so bad. We're currently in an apartment but hopefully will be in a house soon, so the possibility is there. Since we have a 4 year old, my fiance refuses to get a rescue dog :( We're thinking a rottweiler or a German Shepard. I can't wait to go on runs together!

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  65. Max is beautiful. And it warms my heart that you are looking at the Humane Society. Rescue is such a wonderful and rewarding experience.

    I have a dog. I finally convinced my husband that we should get one (after 10 years of nagging), when there was a crazy man hanging around our 'hood hitting women with hammers and then running away. Hubby didn't want me running alone in the dark (I'm a morning, year-round runner). I was angry that I was expected to give up my running time for some crazy, woman-hating jerk (Hubby wouldn't come with me on my early morning runs). So we got a dog.

    I knew I wanted an Australian Shepherd. Great medium-to-high-energy dogs who would make a great running companion. I knew because my brother had one, and Toby came running with me every now and then, which was the most fun to be had on six legs! So we found a local Aussie rescue organization and filled out adoption papers. They were THRILLED to find a runner who wanted a dog, and we were matched with 11-month old "Bob" (since renamed Fergus) almost immediately.

    Fergus is an Aussie-Border Collie mix, and he runs EVERYWHERE with me. In two years, he has come on every single run that I have gone on, and I have never missed a scheduled run thanks to his smiling face. I can't. He needs his exercise. He's got a lot of energy to burn. (When we aren't running together, he is running alongside my bike as I go for a bike ride, or he is hiking through the trails of our nearby national park, or he is exploring snowy riverbanks as I snowshoe. And because he is a herding breed, he always wants to be near his peeps, so he never runs off, even when he is off leash).

    And therein lies the deal with Aussies. You don't need to run with them every day. But you NEED to exercise them - quite a bit - every day. At least two 45-to-60 minute walks if you aren't going to run. Because otherwise, they will turn that energy inwards towards your house and destroy everything. This is a high energy breed that wants a high energy lifestyle. Also, Aussie's like to talk. A lot. So if you don't love barking, not the dog for you. But if you want your children, or your neighbour's children, herded, well, this sheep dog is the one for the job!

    If you do want to run with the dog, don't get a puppy. They need to be about a year old (stop growing) before you can run with them regularly.

    Finally, after what is surely the longest comment ever (but what can I say I love dogs), a gratuitous plug for my own blog, where I talk about running with my dog a lot, including how I taught him to run nicely on a leash, how he protects me from crazy people, and how he forces me to run in -40. If you are interested, you can check out our stories there. It is www.herdinthehood.blogspot.ca

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  66. I have 2 Australian cattle dog crosses, an 8 year old and a 2 year old. I adopted both from a shelter at puppyhood. I think pups or an older dog is fine as long as you get one that match your personality. Lots of older dogs get dumped because their owners move or pass away, and they are perfectly excellent dogs, but some are in shelters because of their chronic "wanderlust"... And some older dogs are in shelters so long they literally get a prison mentality! We saw this a lot at a no kill shelter I worked at, some of the dogs that had been around forever just could not function in a house full of people with rules and quiet... Lol. I love mutts, but research your breeds, I wouldn't recommend cattle dogs for everyone because you really do have to train the snappiness out of them because it's bred into them. I do recommend King Charles spaniels, seriously the happiest breed of dog I've ever met, if I ever wanted a purebred family dog, that's what I would go with.

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  67. I would definitely say adopting a dog from a rescue is the best way to go. You are saving two dogs the one you are taking home and it's opening a spot for the rescue to take in another. There are so many great dogs out there looking for homes!!

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  68. We have a lab mix who used to hike a lot with us but is too much of a spazz to run with and well, now he's too old to do much of anything, poor guy. I have gone the puppy route and older dog route and I feel like getting a dog around 6-8 months old is a great age. I love puppies but getting up through the night just isn't that appealing to me. I always highly recommend shelters and if you are set on a specific breed, try searching in your area--there are tons of purebred (and mixed breed) rescues that usually foster their dogs so they know about their temperament and sometimes their history. :)Good luck in your search!

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  69. Yay! Glad to see so many people promoting rescue!!!

    I'm surprised more people haven't said "doodle" crosses - both my in-laws and I have found perfect, less than a year old "doodles" (ours is a '2nd generation golden x poodle', theirs a 'lab x poodle') in shelters just waiting for us! Most dogs I think tend to get really obnoxious around 7-8 months and people dump them in shelters. ANYWAY, I love my doodle brain - she's not an Einstein by any stretch of the imagination, but she'll run and go paddleboarding or WHATEVER you want! Because she! just! loves! you! The idea of running off never occurs to her, poor thing.

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  70. We brought home a sheltie puppy (about 3 months old) in December. He's fuzzy and sweet and loves long walks and playing outside. When he's a bit older, I could do shorter runs w/ him. He's smart and a very happy addition to our family.

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  71. My parents have always had shih tzu's, and I have to laugh at the image of them running! They are spoiled lap dogs (whom I love dearly).
    I have 2 cats and they don't care if I run or not!

    On another note, I so want to make (and send) you homemade oreo's with vodka "creme'"!!!

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  72. We love our dogs! Although, neither of them can run very far. Delilah is a half Lhasa Apso and half Silky Terrier. Surprisingly, she hardly ever barks. We got her from a breeder. Dixie is half Border Collie and half Great Pyrenees. We got her a Boulder Humane Society. We totally lucked out with her. She was two and totally trained. She was a stray and no one ever claimed her which I can't believe because she was so well trained. She is the most loyal, loving dog that I have ever had. We looked for a second dog that would be a good match for us and she was great. I think the shelter is a good place to start, you just have to be patient to find the right dog. I would check online every week and that is where I found Dixie. On another note, I did see a Bernese Mountain Dog puppy yesterday and I think that was the cutest puppy I have ever seen! I can't wait to see what you get!!

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  73. We lost our lab last year, after 14 great years. So, I know exactly how you feel. So hard to imagine replacing them, but when we were finally ready we got a puppy. He is great, he's a lab/German short hair pointer mix, and he's great! Super smart, gentle with the kids, friendly to a fault, and he's turning into a great running buddy! I've only taken him on short run up to 4 miles, but he loves it, has tons of energy and always wants to go. Good luck! You'll find someone to take a place in your heart, but never to replace Lucky!

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  74. We have a shar pei lab mix and he is so fabulous! Loves to run with me and is quite sad when I go without him. He is a gentle giant and was a rescue dog. Our latest is a bullwrinkle puppy. Not a rescue but a hoot! He is a ball of wrinkles but not the runner type! I'd do either again and both are great with our kids. moving past the loss of a pet is emotional, but opening your heart to a dog who needs your love is priceless.......

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  75. Oh and a Bullwrinkle is part shar pei and part bulldog.

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  76. We lost our dog just after Christmas. The wound is still so fresh. I don't know if I'll ever get another dog, but if I do, it will need to be a mutt, a rescue, and one that can run with me. Good luck on your search! One day, you'll just know. Your heart will pick one for you.

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  77. we have a yellow lab! Shes amazing, and runs very well with me, (I dont do more than 3 miles with her at a time) Shes very disciplined, loving, sweet, and has characteristics of HUMAN. its almost scary how smart she is. Shes not too big, either. About 60 pounds.

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  78. We have a 60 lb retriever mix that we got from a rescue when he was around 2 years old. He looks like a black golden retriever with white on him. We doggy DNA tested him and it said he was a 25% boxer, 25% Chesapeake Bay retriever and 50% who knows what. He's the calmest dog ever. I haven't been successful at getting him to run with me. He wants to run full out and not at my pace.

    We had a golden retriever before this dog. Half of the reason I originally got a dog was to force me to exercise by taking the dog for a walk.

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  79. We adopted a dobie/ridgeback hound mix puppy from the SPCA 6 years ago, We let the kids pick the dog that seemed most friendly, we put a lot of time in training her...but now have the perfect beast....even afraid to get a second dog for fear of changing our Java! Any breed dog you decided on, you will grow to love....RIP Lucky.

    email me your address and I'll send you the Sherry Arnold magnet we made from your advice list... debra.yingling@gmail.com

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  80. My dog is a papillon. I don't know if the breed is really built for anything other than being cute and a lapdog, but my girl and I started training when she was 6mo-1yr and now she will run trails with me up to 5 miles. She doesn't like the water although I know some love to go swimming. She helps me keep a quicker pace most of the time because she LOVES to run. It's funny so see such a fancy dog covered in mud and sticks and junk, but it's her favorite thing. She's going to be 5 this year and after she was attacked in the fall the vet noted she has arthritis in her hips, but it's also specific to her because she was the runt of her litter. They're considered in the top 10 of intelligent dogs and she is a very fast learner and people pleaser. One downside...they are bad at being housebroken. I'd say maybe get one who is older than a puppy and already trained if you don't want to deal with it. If you go with another breed, I think there's a special bond that comes from raising them, but many say animals know when you rescue them and that bond is amazing, which makes an older dog attractive too.

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  81. I have a German Shepherd mix. We got her when she was 10-11 months old from the shelter. I didn't want a puppy partially because puppies are always immediately adopted from the shelter and wanted to get a less adoptable dog.

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  82. I have a jack ruseell mix - maybe also Italian greyhound? He is 20 pounds with long legs and has done marathon training with us - his longest run was 20 miles and he could have done a lot more. He is awesome on the leash and loves to go any distance any time. He is also small enough that I can scoop him up if we run into trouble with another dog. I would get another dog like him in a heartbeat. My shepherd mix got tired of running at about age 7; I don't think Pogo will ever want to give it up. And he is a great snuggler when we are at home and a very sweet personality.

    From my work with a humane society...I recommend a black dog. They tend to get adopted last. Poor Black Dog Syndrome.

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  83. I have two fat Pugs. They are awesome pets, no so awesome training partners (-:

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  84. Pet-sitting my neighbor's lab when they had their first baby helped me so much get over the death of my 14 year old lab-border collie mix. As a matter of fact, they just had their 2nd baby yesterday and we again had Duncan the lab. But now we have our "Gentle Ben". He is a border collie that was a stray that we got from the Border Collies in Need rescue group. You can check them out on-line. Our Ben is a mellow, low-energy border collie. He will run with me up to 10 miles if it isn't too hot and I bring water for him. Or he will just lay down by us and be mellow. Definitely the best disposition I have ever seen in a dog. He is my shadow. He does like to counter-surf. I don't know if that is because he went hungry when he was a stray or what. Other than that bad trait, he is awesome.

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  85. I've had dogs for 25 years and run with all breeds. Queensland Heeler, Golden Retriever (too mellow for me). Labs (hit or miss - depends on personality), German Shepards (great, great dogs but big, get hot more easily here in Nevada). Our Shepards are both 11 and haven't run for the last couple years. One is completely blind. They're well trained though and fabulous dogs so I decided I'd get a younger dog now and they could help with training. I went to the shelters for 3 months trying to find the right fit and it just didn't happen. I have a friend that works there and was helping but no luck. My husband looked on Craigs List for Queensland Heelers because he knew mine was one of the best dogs I"ve ever owned. Sure enough he found a litter. I was looking for a dog 9-12 months old and out of some of the puppy crap, but decided I'd suffer through potty training and puppyhood to get the dog that was trained the way I wanted. I picked out a female based on personality - not too curious, not a sloth - and we've had her for over 2 months now. She's getting trained really well albeit slowly.... She runs up to a 5K with me on leash (and her "heel" is getting better) and off leash on a 2 mile trail loop. I wanted a family dog, protective, loyal, with energy but wouldn't eat the entire couch.... I just love the Queensland's for family and for running.

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  86. I adore my greyhound. Oscar is an amazing dog, sweet, kind, patient with my kids, and really fun. Super laid back, and almost never barks. I can't say enough good things about greyhounds. Also, there's something kinda awesome for runners to have a retired runner in the house.

    With many of the racetracks closing in the past few years, there's a lot of greys out there in need of homes!

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  87. I'd like to to recommend an English Springer Spaniel. I've owned three over the years, and each one has been amazing in his/her own way. Gentile, intelligent, energetic but not hyper. And if you don't want to train a puppy, breeders are a great resource. I adopted my soon to be 13 year old girl from a breeder who had retired her and was looking for a home for her.

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  88. I have two rescue dogs. A border collie mix and a german wirehaired terrier mix. Both about 50 lbs. each (large enough to totally pin your legs in bed!) My boys are both very high energy and love to run. They are the loves of my life :) I highly recommend getting a shelter dog . . . it's as if they know that they have been saved.

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  89. I was given two pomeranians from a breeder who had more puppies than she could sell. I never planned on getting anymore dogs, but now I cannot imagine life without them. They are now four years old and still look like puppies. They are smart and sweet and I love them very much. However, they are not good running companions and they are too small to navigate trails for hiking.

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  90. I've had two Doberman boys in my life. They both loved, and I mean LOVED to go running and hiking. Even if I wasn't headed towards the woods, they would automatically try and get me to go in that direction. They loved trails and trees and were perfectly built for stamina and play. Good luck with your search- the right dog will click with you instantly.

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  91. I have Shiba Inus. Well A Shiba Inu now, since we lost our sweet girl about a year ago. I love the breed, but they can be a challenge! I never ran with mine. The streets where I run are pretty busy. When we get another dog later on down the road, I will probably adopt an older one for two reasons. First, they are typically less destructive forces than a puppy. And two, everyone adopts puppies because they are so cute. My heart breaks for the older dogs that need homes but get passed over for the little cute forces of destruction.

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  92. I have a Vizsla, she is the greatest running inspiration (I'm a new runner and we live in Canada -21C this morning). Watching her wagging tail just makes me want to keep going. She even humors me and acts tired after I run my measly 5km.

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  93. I LOVE those questions so prepare yourself.
    I have a German Shepherd because I run very early in the morning. He runs really well in the winter and I've taken him up to 13 miles in the Spring. Not so good in the summer. His coat is too thick. But for security - there isn't a soul out there who would approach me with Shane at my side. He's the best running partner because he runs however fast or slow I want to run.
    He's not overly obsessed with stopping to smell everything. He's the perfect running partner.
    Dog #2: We have an 11 mos old Border Collie. She's a bit more of a handful. She likes to lead and may even cross my path which is dangerous as we run. She will also try to "herd" me as we run which is very annoying. Not so intimidating as the Shepherd but still, a nice shorter distance running partner who I hope to turn into a distance runner. I know once she matures she will be able to go farther than the G.S.
    As for busy roads, they have a leash called the "Buddy System" so you can run hands free with your dog. It attaches around the waist. Train the dog to run on your left side or side closest to the sidewalk and you're all set. Good luck.
    AND... the German Shepherd will ALWAYS be my favorite breed.

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  94. We have two rescues - a miniature Schnauzer and some kind of terrier mix. The mini Schnauzer can't run very far, but the terrier can run miles! And he loves it! Try PetFinder.com, that is where I found my second rescue. I'd totally go for an older dog, there are lots out there, and many of them are already housebroken - huge plus! I'd definitely get both of my dogs again, even if the mini Schnauzer can't run with me. He is a great at cuddling! :)

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  95. I have a rescued purebred basenji. Awesome cuddled and runner! Do your research though:) I got him as an adult to kind of skip the chewing phase, but mostly to rescue a dog. Good luck!

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  96. We have had two German Shorthaired Pointers, and are talking to breeders right now for our third (Our last one suddenly and unexpectedly passed very recently, taking a huge chunk of our hearts with her). They are wonderful family dogs, and LOVE to run - they smile the whole time, then lick the salt off your face when you're done. They are exceptional companions, are great with kids, and did I mention the LOVE to run? They do have a leeeetle bit of OCD, but, well, who doesn't? Both our girls were from breeders in Colorado, too, now that I think of it. (as a military family, that's actually quite the coincidence.)

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  97. I have a jack Russell and a big, somewhat dumb lab, mix of the two would be perfect!

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  98. I love pitbulls. I grew up with them, and have never had an issue with them. I've had labs turn on me, shepherds... Never a pit. I found my latest edition running the day after Christmas. Someone had tied him up in the park we think Christmas Eve since it was so nasty here Christmas. He was about 30# underweight and standing in a puddle of water in 30degrees. I'm a sucker for rescues. A great distance dog besides potties are the hounds. Particularly blue ticks. I fostered a sweet girl for 2 years. She was my daily running buddy through my marathon training. She was my favorite foster. :).
    As far as running with a dog, you want to start them off and allow the paws and joints to become accustomed to the impact. A puppy should never be ran more than 1/2a mile. After a year 1 mile and gradually build. A larger breed the increase should not begin until they are 18 months. You'll find the perfect baby like I did, sometimes they find you like Ryjer did.

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  99. We have two mutts (Hugo and Bailey). Mutts that we rescued from the Humane Society in Freeport, Grand Bahama. They were on the chopping block. I don't think I could ever pay for a dog after seeing how many 'unwanted' dogs are put down. (We did pay for an adoption fee, but it was negligible.)

    They are terrible to have a structured runs with (part of them blame could be put on the owners, and not the dog), but they are full of love and cuddles.

    Good luck with your search.

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  100. I have a boxer-american bulldog mix, and she runs with me all the time! In fact, the need to get rid of her excess energy was got me to running consistently in the first place! She stays right by my side even on busy roads and paths, and keeps pace with me all the time. Love her!

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  101. I have a yellow lab. He is a rescue (he was 2 years old when I adopted him). I brought him home almost one year to the day after my first yellow lab passed away. Obviously, I love the breed. He is an excellent running partner.

    Adopting an adult(ish) dog made more sense for us because we both work full time outside of the home which makes housebreaking difficult. Whether you choose a puppy or an older dog, I highly recommend a rescue dog. There are so many amazing dogs out there just waiting for someone to love them!

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  102. I have 2 black labs I run with. 1 will run up to a 10K with me, and the other has run as many as 16 miles with me. I run with both of them 3 times a week, and then I run at least once a week with my long distance dog by himself. If you decide to get a dog to run with, they should be at least 1.5 to 2 years old (depending on size) before they put any mileage on still growing joints

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  103. Blitz is a blue heeler/sharpei mix (yes that is a weird combo!) He is a perfect running partner for me, even according to the chart you posted. Apparently he's suited for the long slow runs. Seeing how my max speed is about a 12 min mile, we get a long really well :) He has trained for a few halfs with me and doesn't bat an eye at 11 miles. He hates running in the heat though. During the summer I limit his runs to under 3 miles unless we are going out early before sunrise. I started running with Blitz when he was about 8 months, began slow and at about a year old he became my full time partner. I can't even pick up my running shoes to put them away without him going completely ape and dancing at the door.
    Adopting him was the best decision I made regarding my running. He is the greatest motivator. He loves it so much, I feel guilty if I don't take him out at least 4-5 times a week. His temperament and behavior are much better when he gets in his regular excursive, mine too I suppose. :) I can't imagine now going running without a dog. Good Luck with your search, you'll find your perfect friend when the time is right.

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  104. I don't actually have a dog, but my parents have a pure bred lab. When I'm in 1/2 marathon training and run out of people to run with Ollie is always willing to go. His limit is about 5 miles. He does like deer, so I've had to limit the places that I take him. He is super calm to be around also. I guess I have the best of both worlds, as my OCD husband and I would not be able to handle the dog hair and mess associated with a dog, but I still have a companion when I need it.

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  105. I have three dogs, 2 beagles and a lab mix. All of them are rescues all were between 2-4 when we adopted them. Grover, one of the beagles, is my running buddy and he makes me smile through the whole run. The most he does is 4 miles right now but we are building on distance. This dog Max is so cute! Adult dogs and black dogs always stay in rescue/shelters longer than other dogs.
    My guy Max was 8 when we adopted him from the shelter where I volunteer. He was returned after 8 years with a family and he stole my heart and was my soul dog for 3 1/2 years before he passed away from a brain tumor. You will know when the time is right, the right dog will just get in your heart.
    Good luck in your search!

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  106. I run with my golden. I vote goldendoodle, they have the intelligence of poodles, the kid-friendly personality of goldens, non shedding and great runners.

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  107. I have an almost 3-year old Golden Retriever named Murphy who is the reason I started running a couple of years ago, to get him more exercise. He's my second Golden as an adult on my own. (Growing up, we always had mutts for our family dogs, the only requirement being that they be big dogs, no yappers.) I don't have kids, but I have several nieces and nephews and Goldens are fabulous with kids (although pretty rambunctious for the first few years). The 4th anniversary of my beloved Cosmo's passing was this past Saturday, and it took me 15 months before I was ready to let another one into my heart, but it's definitely been worth it. I really think you'll know when it's the right time AND the right pooch.

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  108. If you want a dog that will shower you with love 24/7, cuddle on the couch all hours of the day (very lazy) and act silly and make you laugh daily.....get a pug!! They are not running dogs, but seriously they are sweet and charming and very snuggly. :) Mine is the apple of my eye.

    I grew up with labs though and they are equally as wonderful and can actually run a lab around the neighborhood without dying. :)

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  109. My Molly is a red heeler/akita rescue and she's the best running companion. She can go forever (20km+? Yes please!) and in any weather (though the colder, the better). She's excellent on a leash (she tends to get excited and pull for the first 10 minutes but then she settles in right beside me for the rest of the way) but off-leash is when you really get to see her joy. I got her specifically for running safety, since my mother had concerns about me running in the dark (and when you live in Canada and you have a job, you run in the dark 5 months of the year), and I put bicycle lights on her collar :)

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  110. We went to the animal shelter for a dog for our daughter. Walked past a cage with an adorable little dog sitting there, wagging his tail. I said to Daughter, "NO Jack Russell Terriers!" Well, he is actually a JRT/Beagle mix and very happy as head of our household. He was a street dog and we don't know his history, I have tried running with him several times but I am not able to get very far with him. I probably just need to take him out more so he knows what he's supposed to do.

    Our other dog we got at an adoption event at the petstore. I told the girls, "No dogs that need grooming!" We came home with the sweetest, formerly abused West Highland Terrier. We've had him for 3 years now and he's around 9 with lots of medical issues, we can barely walk down to the end of the street and back. Poor thing, we call him our Little Old Man dog.

    Next time we go to get a dog, I'm going to say "no" to something I really want :-)

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  111. Right now, I have 4 dogs and run with 3. I don't always want 4 dogs, but will probably always have 1. I live in Montana and trail run, so the dogs are able to run off leash, we hardly ever see another person or dog. If you are serious about your Garmin times, an off leash dog could mess that up for you. Your dog will have to be leash trained very well to run with you on leash. I have two German Shorthairs, one Weimaraner, and one Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. My male gsp is my favorite, a great runner and all aroung athlete, I would definitely get a GSP again.

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  112. I was blessed with two fantastic dogs. One was a mutt, mostly Norwegian elkhound, and she was calm, sweet, and perfect with kids (my sister and I were 4 and 6 when we got her and we had her for 12 years). My second dog, who we got a year before the first passed, was an Australian Shepherd. She was an insane puppy - trying to herd the older dog (and us) and was headstrong and stubborn until her dying day almost 15 years later. But she was also incredibly sweet, intelligent, and just the best companion. She was a big marshmallow and made herself a lap dog - a 55 pound lap dog.

    Aussies are an energetic breed and need tons of daily exercise. My parents had invisible fence and 2+ acres and Molly had the run of the yard while we were at home. She was great to run and hike with until she was older (about 12 or so) and then we stopped running with her but kept up daily walks until a cyst on her leg made that rough for her. Aussies are wonderful companions and great for runners, but you really need to work with them a lot as puppies, as their intelligence means they get bored easily - and when they get bored, then can be destructive.

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  113. After losing our pal last March, we adopted again from a shelter in November. We went with a puppy and at times I curse myself... but I keep trying to remember that in a few months much of his annoyances will be a memory that will fade as time goes by. Afterall, we cannot think of anything our previous dog ever did wrong. We only remember that he was absolutely perfect, all the time. Our new puppy's name is Bodhi and he's an interesting looking dog with a fair amount of energy. He's a mix and depending on who you ask, the mix changes... The vet says Terrier/Shepherd... The shelter had him down as Terrier/Pit. He could be all of the above. He looks like a little siberian tiger with orange/brown fur with black striping. Good luck - you'll know when and it may happen sooner than you anticipate... it just works out that way sometimes.

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  114. I have an 11 year old, 40 lb (lab/pitbull) mix. She followed my friend home on her run one day and my boys fell in love with her and wanted to keep her. Sadie was about a year old and had tons of energy! I took her on runs with me (short runs at first) and she eventually trained for marathons with me (her distance PR is 18 miles). She is the best running partner I've ever had! She helped me run faster and never complained if I held her back when I was struggling. Unfortunately we live in the south and it gets too hot for her to run very far most of the year. Now that she's older we go on much shorter runs but she can still pull me along most of the way! When I rescue my next dog, it will be one that is older. Puppies are too much work. Even though Sadie was around a year old when we found her, she had a chewing/destruction problem until she was over 2 years old. If I could find another one like her, (after she is gone) I would adopt him/her in a heartbeat!

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  115. Oh my, if I came across Max at shelter, I would not have been able to leave him there. I have an strange affinity for black shelter dogs.

    My running partner is Maggie, a black lab mutt shelter rescue. We got her when she was about 4 months old, so not crying for her mom, but still full of puppy mischief. She's gone up to 13 miles, as long as it's not much over 65 degrees. She can really sprint, but only needs to trot to keep up with me. She makes me feel safe out on the street alone. I highly recommend using a haltie for better control on the leash while running though.

    It's hard to convince a dog that you only want to run with them 'sometimes'! They know what your running shoes are for and will guilt you into taking them if they can. Maggie starts 'singing' to me from the yard when she hears my Garmin beep or my Amphipod belt buckle click.

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  116. I wish I had seen this when it went up alas I had the Flu last week. Running with a Dog....I have a 7yo GSP as well and she is a dream to run with. Though that is as much to her disposition as it is to the amount of training she has received. Pay very close attention to what the dog you are looking at was bred for. For instance GSP's Vizslas and Weimaraners can be family dogs, in which case they will have a mellow disposition and though energetic might not be the best dog for long or spirited runs on the trail (especially off leash) or working dogs which are better suited to tasks and direction but need exercise regularly. My GSP, Muji is a gun dog fail from a long line of hunting dogs and as such takes direction like any working dog. She has no problems spending hours running, I have never found her off switch and short of carrying extra water and a collapsable bowl for her running with her is like running with the best pacer you could imagine. That said she needs to run for at least an hour 2-3 days a week (more is good) or she is (like me) unbearable. She is a much an athlete if not more than I am, I was sick the last week and unable to run she let me know that while she felt sorry for me she wanted to run, she even brought me my Trail shoes from the closet. This morning when I started putting on my running clothes she started vibrating, though she settled as soon as we hit the road. Road Running she wears a chain collar and I use an extending leash, its light provides her with some freedom and is easier to guide her than a fixed length leash. On the trail she wears an electronic collar, control her with a tone these days she was trained on one 6 years ago and is very obedient I keep a chain collar and a short leash in my pocket for whenever we run across too many people for her to move without scaring people. It works for us. I don't run without her, that would be cruel not to mention she needs it as much or more than I do. This means I don't go to trails that she can't run, which is OK most of those in my area as high Bird population which for her is a huge distraction and can be a problem. I would say get a puppy training a dog from day one to run with you is work but the sooner you start it the more enjoyment both of you will have. Another thing to watch it your dogs idiosyncrasies....Muji is terrified of horses and oddly sewer grates, the former is easy enough to deal with latter can be disconcerting, she knows where every grate is in the neighborhood so regardless if I can see them (like if they are covered in snow) she knows where they are and will not run within 6 feet of one; an issue if I'm not providing enough leash for her to move in front or behind me while we are running past one that I don't see...getting hip checked by a 50lbs dog because she won't run in seemingly open road can ruin your run in the blink of an eye. Some odd things I have noticed she's a shorthair and has to be moving to be warm (or cool for that matter) I keep a blanket in the truck to cover her with post run, I have an orange cape she wears during hunting season, In the summer I keep ice in a cooler for her to lick so she can cool off after a run. Her nose gets chapped in the winter so I put BagBalm on it a few times a week in the summer I put child safe sunscreen on it just in case. I grew up with Labradors and while I love them they aren't a running dog, I will never not have a GSP in the family too much good company.

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  117. we adopted our sweet chocolate lab right after we got married and i love him so much! he will run with me, but likes to hike better.

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  118. We have three dogs.
    Our oldest is a retired racing Greyhound. He is sweet and calm and has really bad gas. I do not run with him, but walk him regularly. He is a sprinter and out of shape, so not a great running partner. He is probably the most people friendly dog I have ever had and am considering getting him certified to visit hospitals. But, the first two years were pretty hard.
    I also have a heeler/husky mix. He is the cutest dog I have ever had. But, he is a lot of dog. He needs to run on a regular basis or his is wild. We have had him since he was a puppy and he is really good with our kids (one who is special needs).
    I just got a German Shepard. She was abused and we are slowly getting her to realize that no one here is going to hurt her (she's about two years old). I run with her too and she is really the only dog we have that I think would protect me if I needed it. I have to say that this is my favorite breed and I will probably only get German Shepards from now on. She is so smart and loyal and affectionate.
    If I were you, I would get a German Shepard puppy from a rescue and run with him or her. Check your area for a German Shepard rescue.

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