Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Secrets To Your Kick-Ass Marathon Training Plan

It seems like forever since I’ve trained for a marathon.  It feels so amazingly good to be back.

When I got sidelined back in October 2010 with a femoral stress fracture (left hip) I was in the middle of tapering for what was going to be my fastest marathon yet (or so I thought). With the results of that MRI, I was heart broken - just like so many of you have been when you’ve had to give up on races you trained so hard for. 

I cried, drank wine, yelled obscenities at other runners, felt sorry for myself and watched bad TV. Then, I started fighting because having goals and doing anything that made me feel the tiniest bit athletic was my salvation. Plus, I had qualified for Boston a few months earlier and no way in hell was I giving up my spot.

What did I do? As soon as I could, I hobbled on my crutches onto the deck of the indoor pool, got in the water and ran. Almost every stinking day.

P1080202

I am smiling but whispering “this mother eff’ing sucks the big one.”

I hated it. But it kept me in shape. So many times I almost threw in the towel and gave up hope that I would be recovered in time. My PT even told me to forget about marathon training, I would not be healed and it wouldn’t be smart. I pressed on anyway. Five months later and with very little training (one long run of 15 miles and a bunch of other junk miles) I ran Boston. It was my slowest marathon (4:08) by far, but I did it.

It was a great comeback story – someone really should have made a Lifetime movie out of it. Only, I would have to have had an abusive husband stalking me around the marathon course and a bottle of Oxycontin stashed in my running skirt along with a gun and a ransom note.

But, what I’m here to tell you is this – running injuries are no joke. It takes a long ass time to truly heal, to stop compensating, to be 100%. You can train and race like I did, and you can do pretty well at it. But, those damn post-race injury blues and aches and pains haunt you.

I don’t know if I’m 100%, but I finally feel ready to start marathon training again (for this race in May). I’m hoping my body holds up well, but if it doesn’t, I’ll go to plan B (half marathon). The plan I’ve had the most success with in the past is this one:

IMAG1140

It was with a plan of running three days a week and doing lots of cross training (mostly swimming and Bikram yoga) that I was able to qualify for Boston. My body does not like running more than three to four times per week. My body does not like running over 40 miles per week. I accept this as my fate as a runner. I am 45 and have been running for four years. I know I’m limited. But that doesn’t mean I can’t be a successful runner.

IMAG1138

So, I take out my pencil and scrap paper and hatch a 14 week plan that will start on February 11. Over the past year I’ve also incorporated many of the Chi Running techniques and am hoping this will help prevent injury – that said, I will also apply elements found in the Chi Marathon book. I like to take parts from various sources and customize a plan for myself that fits me and my life.

What makes a good marathon training plan? Whether you have a coach, are following a plan from a book or online sources or are creating your own, there are a few components I think a plan should have, especially if you are a newer or first time marathoner. You can disagree, but this is my blog and this is what I think.

  • It should make you excited (not fearful and like you want to crap yourself) when you look at it.
  • It should start you out very gradually. Your beginning mileage should be about what you are running right now per week, if not less.
  • It should incorporate recovery weeks. I like my plans to have a recovery week every fourth week. I build for three weeks, cut back down for one week, then build again
  • It should have at least one complete rest day per week (where you do nothing. No yoga, no burpees, no sex – well, maybe).
  • It should build you up slowly – about 10% percent per week (mileage)
  • It shouldn't incorporate speed work until you have a solid base built up (and Yasso 800s are the BEST).
  • It should have you doing your long runs SLOW (like 60-90 seconds slower than marathon pace). I know some plans incorporate more progressive or marathon pace runs – but for newer runners or first timers I think this can be risky.
  • It should enforce strength and cross training (or you will be burned at the stake).
  • It should incorporate a decent pre-race taper period (when you will lose your mind but you will get much needed rest for the big day).

Just some of my thoughts/advice based on experience, reading, my coaching certification and common sense.

Are you training for a marathon now? Which one? Colfax Marathon in Denver on May 19. Join me!!

What is your best tip for marathon training? Rest, recovery and carry TP.

SUAR

75 comments:

  1. Are those tan lines from where you usually wear your underwear with that swimsuit? ;)

    I use Hal Higdon's training program. I call him Grandpa Hal and my favorite tip from him is, "If you're tired, rest. If you need to walk, walk. Only runners care about time. The rest of the world is impressed you finished a marathon."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "The rest of the world is impressed you finished a marathon." SO true! I have to remember that.

      Delete
    2. I love that! My one and only marathon was sloooowwwww...It was 80 degrees...I cramped up at mile 14, started walking at mile 18...determined to finish. I was disappointed in my time, but no one else seems to care. I have to remember that only 0.1% of the population has ever run a marathon... Thanks for this!

      Delete
  2. Good advice! I am doing a 25-week marathon training for my very first marathon. I have found it to be very reasonable and focuses on cross training/weights as you mentioned. Thanks for the tips!

    http://chroniclesofawildcat-melissa.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do you have any suggestions for marathon plans? And how to introduce gels/goo for runs? I'm a 1/2 marathoner making the jump with a marathon in October (plenty of training time since I suffer from cronic knee injuries) andhave no idea where to even start for picking plans. Any advice would be great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The bad thing about asking this question is that everyone has done a different plan, and most people would recommend that plan to you. Thus 14 different plans named after a guy's last name are thrown your way ;)

      Do a simple google search and find one that you like, or stop by your local book or running store and pick up a book. Most plans will get you to the marathon, it's just about finding one that works for YOU.

      Delete
  4. All sound advice. While training w/ a coach for the first time for a marathon (mine is March 16) I am definitely getting a different approach than anything I've had before. But I like it--much more focused on MP than what I have done before. Will be excited to see how it goes.

    Enjoy your journey back to a marathon!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Way to save yourself on the "long SLOW run" bullet point with putting in that the slowness is better for newer runners. This being said, I feel most people who have progressed past the stage of novice or newb still do their long runs too slow.

    As Canova would say, "What does 1 15 mile run at 90 sec slower than goal race pace have to do with the marathon? Nothing."

    I tried the FIRST protocol for a while a few years ago. Since I was training for an ultra marathon, I even emailed back and forth with the authors to modify the plan for ultra athletes. However my downfall was that I based the goal paces off of a 5k done on a cooler morning, and was attempting to do the prescribed paces (generally) during the heat of the summer afternoon. It led to failed workouts and burnout, but I recovered and did my first 100 miler later that fall :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All depends on your perspective of "too slow". If one is trying to build base in Z2 for a marathon effort, the exact opposite is true, most people run those miles TOO FAST, often at Z3 effort. That message seems to be consistent in much of the HR-based literature.

      Delete
  6. Great post! I'm currently training for my first marathon. Gulp. It will be the Lincoln National Guard Marathon here in Nebraska in May. So far, so good! I'm on week 5 of the 20 week plan from Train Like a Mother. Good luck on your comeback! Spent half of last summer injured and it sucks! But the comeback is awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used the TLAM Finish It plan for my first marathon and am using it for my second. I like that for each race there's a Finish It and an Own It plan.

      Delete
  7. Wonderful post!! And I love that book and do well also with 3-4 days a week running!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I am "training" for half marathons. I put training in quotes because I am not good at following plans so what I am doing is just slowly upping my mileage because the one and only half I did I ended up hurt because I had not run more than 6.5 miles at a time before that one. I just run how long I can with the time left in the day and how I feel...as long as I have one long run each week....1st week of Jan it was 7.25, last week 10.13 miles and this week I have a 10 mile race so that will be my long run. I am not nor will I ever be fast so I have decided to work on distance this year.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Am 95% sure we will be running Colfax (the half) too. We did that one last year and enjoyed it. And this year the course for the half changed quite a bit, so will feel like a different race. Of course this all hinges on that ugly thorn in my side, my breathing. Still working on it. But had my best run since last year's Colfax this past Sunday, freezing cold and all. So hopefully can sign up here soon! See you there!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YES!! So glad to hear you will be there as well! I know how this breathing thing has plagued you and I just hope this training cycle works well for you. Keep me posted!!

      Delete
    2. Thanks Beth, me too! And congrats on being selected as an ambassador for this race as well, nice bonus! And if the full works out for you, I will be able to watch you cross the line, like the twist on that!! :)

      (P.S. Just got an email from the Colfax folks mentioning a pricing change after 1/30, so that is my new deadline to decide! If I have a few more good runs like last weekend, I am signing up! Will be good to have a new carrot!)

      Delete
    3. I am thinking of doing the Colfax Half as my first half ever. Would you suggest a training schedule that is the same length at the marathon one you are doing (14 weeks) with less mileage (obviously!)? I am primarily a trail runner, but that is non-existent in the winter so it seems like a good time to run on pavement more (slight cringe...). I love reading your blog and will hope to say hello to you in May.

      Delete
    4. 14 weeks can be kind of short, but if you have a good base and already run 10-20 miles per week, I think it should be fine. Hope to meet you as well!

      Delete
  10. Exciting! As much as we moan about marathon training, we really do love the promise that goes with it, don't we?

    Have a blast training!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'm training for the NJ marathon on May 5th. It will be my 2nd. My best tip is to be consistent. Unless you are injured or run down, get your behind out there. If you half ass training, so shall your race be.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have had success with a number of different plans but have to say I really did enjoy the Run Less, Run Faster plan for both a half and a full marathon. I never did the cross training, though, and still did well. I occasionally ran an extra day as "cross training" but my mileage stayed low throughout. That said, I was still nervous about being undertrained when I toed the line before the race!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I'm running my first marathon this Sunday! I'm nauseous from anxiety. Heres hoping the training I did has me prepared!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm training for the London marathon using Run Less Run Faster and am loving the quality run cross training combo. The thing I particularly like that it gives me the exact paces to run at per km, no trying to figure out what 60% or whatever of my max heart rate is - win for me.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Just about to start training for my first marathon this June (Seattle RnR). I've done lots of half marathons, but not a full yet. My husband and I are in the process of reading about the Hanson Method to see if that will work for us. My biggest worry is we are slow, I just hope we can get our speed up enough that we don't take 6 hours finish!

    ReplyDelete
  16. The ONLY bad thing about your blog (and some others that I’ve found through yours) is how much is expands my already backed up reading list. I tried what little bit of chi running techinique that I could glean from your posts and a few articles and I felt an immediate improvement in efficiency. And I’ve been contemplating adding some yoga.

    I’m scared to change too much about the simple training plan I’m using right now out of fear of fixing something that may not be broken, but I’ve already realized some things that I know I can incorporate and schedule better for my next one…And I’m already getting an itch to target my next one. Woohoo! Thanks for another great post.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I so needed this post. that swimsuit photo looks damn familiar (except mine has a hot pink swim cap and goggles). I freaking hate swimming. Or water jogging. Gross. I ran my stupid marathon, though I shouldn't have. And I got an embarrassingly slow-ass time (5:48). I'm with you — I'm not sure if I'm 100%, but I signed up for that same marathon that's October 20 this year (last one was Oct 19, 2008). My goal is to PR, which is going to be easy. I could basically walk and PR. But I'm having a hard time (in january, to boot) looking at my times (that are 8:45-9 min/mi) and going, DAMN YOU ARE SLOW. I just came off an ankle sprain (august) and am really getting back into running. Ultimately, I would love to PR my marathon time (since I don't plan to run another after this, ever) with an 8:15 / min mile time, like my half marathon time ... but I need to quit thinking about that because it's January.

    Sorry. Long-ass comment, but this post really spoke to me. I've pinned the tips for later consumption. Right now I'm just trying not to fall on my ass.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I had to go down to 3 days a week of running due to a calf injury and just couldn't stand myself or anyone else who could run more. So instead of continuing the pout train, I started swimming twice a week and biking twice a week. I feel like such a stronger runner with more leg power, more endurance, and happier legs. Cross training is definitely the way to go...

    ReplyDelete
  19. Love this post. I'm starting my first taper week as I head into my first full marathon on February 3. I've listened to my body, mellowed out when I needed to, but put the work in to say that I will at least FINISH a marathon.

    And then, if I'm crazy enough, I can actually run for time. Thanks for your thoughts!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Αhaa, іts fastidious dіscussiοn regaгding this piece
    of writіng herе аt this wеbsite,
    I hаve reаd аll thаt, ѕο at this time me аlso commenting at thіs plаce.
    Take a look at my blog post ; online payday loans

    ReplyDelete
  21. Use your long runs to simulate race-like conditions. Meaning, the elevation changes similar to the course you are going to run, fueling/hydration strategies, etc.

    The Kidless Kronicles

    ReplyDelete
  22. I turn 40 this year and last night, armed with a giant glass of wine and the new Runner's World mag, I decided I MUST run my first marathon the weekend after my birthday (new AG, yo). I'm currently training for a 1/2 so hoping that will work into my training.

    I'm eyeing up the Salt Lake City marathon in April.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great post - good info for a newbie.
    I'm 45 and starting to train for my 2nd half marathon in April. Made a lot of mistakes training (skipping runs) during the first time but determined to be more prepared for this one.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I signed up for a half marathon in June, and I hope to find a full one to do in September sometime. I agree that you need to have a good plan and I post mine on the fridge and cross off each session when I comnplete it.
    My best marathon tip is knowing proper nutrition to sustain you on the long runs.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Thanks for posting I needed that. I injured currently and the doc suspects a hip stress fx vs hip labral tear. I'm obviously sad because I wanted to do another marathon. I was supposed to do a 15 k this Sunday but that is out because I can barely walk. Thanks again. Now I just need to get over my insecurity of swimming.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I'm not running any fulls yet but I am running my first half in April with some friends while my brother, an ultramarathoner, runs the full. I'm pumped and terrified simultaniously! Best advice: Get Advice! From people who know the ropes.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Now that I'm finally getting back to running after my broken foot, my PT has advised me to stick to a strict 3-run-a-week + cross training plan. I'm skeptical... training for a half marathon in March and currently running only 10 miles a week seems like it won't work out so well... and even LESS well for the full marathon I hope to run in November.

    BUT I'm glad you wrote this today - I think I'll buy Run Less Run Faster and see if it can help me believe that this will work out for the best. Runner's World should give you a percentage of the profit from sales of that book today. =)

    ReplyDelete
  28. Like if qualifying for Boston was a performance in itself...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure what you mean but yes for some it is

      Delete
    2. I'm happy you got what I meant, stop bragging about it pls

      Delete
  29. These are such great tips. I injured my right hip flexor training for the Chicago Marathon in 2012 and am still not 100%. I'm definitely following a lot of your tips as I come back from my injury, but I'm also incorportating a lot more yoga into my fitness routine. I'm hoping increasing my flexibility and strength in my hips and glutes will help me avoid injuries in the future.

    I'm thinking about signing up for the Fox Valley Marathon in the Chicagoland area which will be in late September. I'm building up for a spring half and then I'm hoping I can increase my mileage from there.

    Good luck with your training! :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. This post is exactly what I needed to read today. An overuse injury (fractured metatarsal) has me sidelined for hopefully no more than 8 weeks and I have just started running in the water. What did you do to make it more exciting? I'm going nuts as I watch the colored flags above the lane lines get slowly closer. Help!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I fractured a metatarsal too. So sorry to hear it happened to you!! I couldn't run for almost 3 months but swimming definitely helped me stay in some kind of shape. Hoping you have a speedy recovery.

      Delete
  31. That pic made me laugh (the book one not the swimsuit and crutches one) because that book has been my bible. Using that I got a PR in the half marathon and full marathon. I took it everywhere and have lots of notes scribbled in it. Then I got injured. 3 times. I hired a coach for Boston this year. When I mentioned "Run Less, Run Faster" he laughed and said that if it works so well why isn't everyone doing it??!! Hmmm...I dunno. Maybe they haven't seen it? Anyway, not to rain on your parade because I still love that book and I think crosstraining is an excellent idea, but I've put it back on the shelf for now. Good luck training and staying uninjured!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I'm actually restarting my first marathon training...again. I am using Hal Higdon's, because it's 18 weeks and it's a progressive and good plan for me. It incorporates a lot of your bullets points. However, it doesn't plan for a recovery week. I think I will have to add that in there. God knows I have the time.

    Because of my injuries (and just getting the cast removed two weeks ago), I won't have enough time to train for a marathon in May. I would at the end of the month, but sadly, I found out that marathons do not happen after the first weekend of May in Texas. They do not reappear (closer to my area) until October. I could travel to another state, but I'm by myself for my first marathon. I don't care, I want family and/or friends to support me. And since I just got done with the injury year from hell, I don't to push myself for the training plans below 18 weeks. So, my marathon is in October. I have plenty of time. But I will add some recovery weeks. I already have weeks of nothing in there, because I will not be able to run or train.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I'm in the middle of recovery so I have no idea when I'll be back fully functional. I am not giving up hope and with patience I'm hoping to run a half this summer.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I run six days a week, but I'm not training for anything. I just run to run.
    But I like reading Jeff Galloway's books so my tip would be: take regular walking breaks.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Long time reader, first time commenter here. Great tips- especially for newer marathoners. If you can handle the mileage, I would consider adding a medium long run (11-15 miles) to your weekly schedule. It has made a huge difference in my marathon times.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I've only been running for 4 years as well, and I'm also in my 40's (48). My training tends to average in the 30's/MPW with a peak (one or two weeks only) of 40 miles or slightly more. I manage to keep hitting PR's in races (and have been able to BQ)with that type of training plan. I think your advice is very good and some of the points often overlooked. My next (9th) marathon will be in early May and tenatively planning my first ultra (6 hour event) in June. Good luck to you in your training.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I have been in the doldrums since January 1st, when I fell and broke my hand during a training run. I had been training since October for a half marathon that I would be running this weekend. Instead, I am walking the 5K. UGH! So, it was kind of nice to be reminded that I am not the first this has happened to. At least it is temporary and not a true running injury. But I can't help it. I am still sad.

    ReplyDelete
  38. What a coincidence! I had not even heard of the Colfax Marathon until yesterday, when I booked a flight to visit my sister in Denver for that exact weekend in May. She is a new runner and I am newer to racing (my first half is this March). We have been discussing running the Colfax half marathon or Urban 10 miler. Maybe we will see you there...among the tens of thousands of people. :)

    ReplyDelete
  39. I'm only 26 and my body doesn't like running more than 4 days a week either, and 40 miles a week is also close to my max. I wish I could run more and I wish I could be a back to back marathoner, but I don't think it's possible for me and my body. Oh well. We can't all be Skinny Runner, right?

    ReplyDelete
  40. Kate- I'm 29 (almost 30!) and also only run 3-4 days a week, if that. But it's my work as a personal trainer that keeps me cross-training, which makes me stronger and therefor, faster. I'm a better runner now than I was in my teens! Honestly, I think depending on one's line of work, you don't always have to run 80-mile weeks to train to run a Boston-Qualifying time, you just gotta make each workout count and as Beth said- take one FULL rest day a week!

    ReplyDelete
  41. Hi there! Did you start training this week or last week for the race? I also am running a marathon on May 19th (Cleveland) and am unsure whether to wait until Monday or start up this week full throttle. Thanks for the tips!! I am ordering that book : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm just doing a 14 week plan, so not starting until 2/11.

      Delete
    2. I'm training for my first marathon at Cleveland as well. Started training Monday! Good luck.
      www.clevelandorbusr26point2.blogspot.com

      Delete
  42. My hubby used that book to train for his last marathon, Philly and he got a PR. I recommended it to a few friends who like it as well.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I'm a three day a week running gal, too. No marathon for me anytime soon. I really want to feel like my body can handle the training instead of hoping my body survives the training. I think you understand!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YES! I have felt this way for the past two years!

      Delete
  44. I was hoping to train for the Green Bay CellCom Marathon in Wisconsin, also May 19th, but I'm currently taking a couple weeks off for ITBS (half-way through a 2 week rest period). My mileage has been low for a while now…I ran a half marathon on Nov. 3rd, and then several shorter races, with my last run being a 10K on New Year’s Eve, so I’m a little worried about trying to launch right into a training plan next week given that my mileage has been relatively low for almost 2 months now. I guess if I’m still feeling pain when I resume running next week, I’ll probably bag it and shoot for a fall marathon. At any rate, here’s hoping we both make it through the next several months injury free – I’ll be rooting for you from Wisconsin!

    ReplyDelete
  45. I decided this year to train for my first marathon...and I am freaking loving this post.

    ReplyDelete
  46. It's nice to know you've been running for 4 years. I felt like the only one that's semi new to running (2+ years for me)! Great advice for training.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I'm training for the Ottawa, Canada Marathon on May 26. I also have two half-marathons planned between now and May 26. I like your training plan, particularly recovery weeks. I find near the end of my training for a marathon I am completely brain and body exhausted. I rely on two weeks of taper, but even that isn;t enough. Recovery weeks might help alleviate this condition. At the height of my training I'm running 5 days a week.. 50 plus miles/ week. Great post, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  48. I'm getting ready to run my first marathon this year--the Chicago Marathon. I'm excited and nervous already and it's not til October! I take a little bit of everybody's training and design my own (Higdon, Bingham, Dreyer, and even played with heart rate training). I'm adding tons of weight lifting this year to hopefully prevent injury. I always enjoy your blog and will definitely be looking forward to hearing about your training this year. I think people just need to listen to their bodies and see what works for them. And most of all, enjoy the run!!!

    ReplyDelete
  49. I signed up for my second marathon in May. I am running Colorado but am really tempted to run the Colfax half since it's running through my workplace (zoo) and that seems fun. Your plan looks good and I really hope you don't get injured again!

    ReplyDelete
  50. I'm exactly the same as you (well, maybe not exactly) - I can never run more than 3, or 4 in a great week, x a week. I'm pretty much OK with that. Even at that I end up on the injured list more than I would like - this time around I'm going to really try and learn to love easy runs!!!
    I had given up training for a marathon (since I can't run every day) but maybe I will try again!!! You have inspired me!

    ReplyDelete
  51. Awesome post! And I agree with everything. Especially for those of us "of a certain age", "less is more" when it comes to marathon training.

    I've run 6 fulls, a 50k race, and 8 or 9 halfs, and really believe in the importance of giving my body enough time to recover between tough workouts. I'm also a big believer in hill training - provided I have a good base to start - and in running back to back runs on weekends. I try to do my LSR on Saturday and an 8-10km recovery on Sunday. It's a great way to build both stamina and confidence. When I can run 10k the day after I've run 32-36k, I know I'm ready!

    Me? Think I'm going to run my next marathon here in Halifax(the "Bluenose") or in Fredericton, NB. Hoping to go somewhere a bit more exotic next year.

    Thanks again for the post. I'll look forward to reading more about your training in the weeks and months ahead.

    ReplyDelete
  52. I definitely think it has been a process for me to find what works best and it's changed over the last 10 years too! I can't run 7 days a week anymore, but I can push myself in speed work. Right now i'm favoring long runs with more speed in them.

    ReplyDelete
  53. I will be training for the Colfax Full Marathon- it will be my first full and I'm so excited!!! I did the half last year which was my first half marathon so it is kind of fitting. :)

    I will be using Hal Higdon's training program with four running days a week. I prefer that over three running days because the two short runs on Tuesdays and Thursdays make the training more manageable for my work schedule.

    See you in May, Beth! Thanks for your blog- I love your running advice, perspective and a getting good laugh in the process.

    ReplyDelete
  54. Your run really resonated with me today. 3 tibia stress fractures with 3 attempts to run a marathon. I finally conquered my demons and completed the Sydney Marathon last September. My time hardly mattered, it meant more to finish and finish feeling great and enjoying every single step of it. I am now making my training plan too for my next marathon in July. Because of my stress fracture history, (Ive also had one in my foot) I am starting to train next week for it. I know that seems too early but Ive learnt I need LOTS of time to increase very slowly, slower than most and lots of rest days because I HATE rest days almost as much as being stuck aqua jogging as a poor substitute to the real thing. Run on Beth, run on. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was meant to say "your blog"!

      Delete
  55. Thanks for the pointers Beth! I will begin marathon training in June (go figure the Hell heat of summer in FL) for MCM in October. I haven't even thought of the plan yet, and have no idea what I'm going to use. I feel like 40-45 miles will be my max as well. You're right about it taking for-evarrrrr with recovering 100%. I'm still feeling a little ache and pain here and there from my minor hip injury last fall. I refuse to let it get me down though.

    ReplyDelete
  56. All these functions are to becomе гeimplemented and simulаted рerѕonally, lοsing аll thе power in the Java languаge
    Crеating modules fοг games is nοt thе only thing сomputeг ρrogrammers liκe
    to perfοrm

    Here is mу websіte - Tao of badass

    ReplyDelete

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.