Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Want to Run Effortlessly and Injury Free? Chi Running Might Be for You.

As you know, I think my running form sucks. This running journey has been back-asswards for me. About 3 ½ years ago, I started running with no knowledge of anything. Since that time, I’ve had to back track and actually learn stuff that “real” runners know. Like most things in life, there is some rhyme and reason to doing it right. Who knew?

When the Chi Running folks contacted me and asked if I wanted to attend their workshop taught by founder Danny Dreyer in Denver, I was all over it. I had had been reading the Chi Running book.  All I can say is this stuff really made sense to me. I began to see how my form not only led to my injuries, but actually sabotaged me as a runner. I understood that if I tweaked some things I might be able to become more efficient and actually enjoy running more because it felt good. Imagine that! Confession: It’s been awhile since running really felt good for me.

 

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First of all, “Chi” simply means “energy” of mind, body and spirit. You don’t have to meditate, sip herbal tea and chant Ohms all day to enjoy what Chi Running has to offer. I see it as a way to marry your mind and body to produce the best running results.

The basics of Chi Running:

  • Posture is in straight line from crown of your head to the bottom of your feet.
  • Lean is forward (not hunching, but maintaining a straight posture and falling forward). Let gravity work for you, not against you. Feet land under hips in a mid-foot strike.
  • Don’t push off with calves or quads. Don't pull with hamstrings.Your legs support your stride, but the effort comes from your core.
  • Allow your pelvis to naturally rotate (think of when you were a kid and you would run at the pool. The lifeguard would scream “WALK” and you would change to a walk but would keep the same momentum, with your pelvis moving all over the place  - or “rotating” - if you want to use the right word).
  • Elbows at 90 degrees, driving back.
  • Cadence stays steady regardless of speed (180 steps per minute is optimal). To increase speed, increase stride length, but not in front – behind you.

The workshop started with about 43 of us sitting in chairs in a bathhouse in Denver. Meeting at a bathhouse freaked me out because the only other bathhouse I’d ever been to was in Istanbul, Turkey when I was 16. That bathhouse was full of very large, naked women who were there to exfoliate and massage tourists. Talk about being out of your comfort zone. Anyway, this bathhouse wasn’t full of naked women – it was more of just a nice meeting facility. Thank God. I don’t know how I would find my mid-foot strike while exfoliating.

For the first hour or so, Danny had us figure out how to sit up using our cores to hold us. Try it. Slouch in your chair like you usually do when you're holding the remote and drinking a beer. Now try pulling yourself up with your core muscles, or the area behind your belly button. This is the part of you that should be engaged always while running.

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Here Danny is talking about my supple hips. If only.

After this, we went outside an practice our forward leans by trusting our partners as we fell forward. After awhile, it was easy to get comfortable leaning forward and catching yourself with your foot as you broke into  a run.

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We broke for lunch and during this time Danny talked SHOES. A question on everyone’s mind. While he does not promote a certain shoe, he does promote how your foot should land. Chi Running is about landing under your hips in a mid-foot strike. Danny believes that heel striking not only causes the runner to “brake” while they run, but it sends shock waves up into the body causing injury. When buying a shoe keep in mind:

  • The shoe should be light, not over 14 ounces. Generally the more a shoe weighs, the stiffer it is. A more neutral shoe (vs. stability, motion control) will teach your foot do do what it needs to do.
  • The toe box does not cramp your foot, but gives your toes room to spread. Toes should not touch the front of the shoe.
  • Hold the shoe and try to bend it. It should bend in the ball (front) area of the shoe. If it bends in the middle it will overstretch the muscles at the bottom of the foot and could cause Plantar Fasciitis.

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My Brooks Cadence have a pretty nice bend to them.

For the record, he’s not a big fan of Newtons, even though he owns a pair. He states that he was able to run faster in those shoes, but doesn’t like how they “force” a fore-foot strike because of the bars built into the front of the shoe. He believes that any shoe that “makes” your foot do something is not the way to go. The runner should train their feet to feel the ground and land correctly and not depend on a shoe for that.

He also chatted and signed some books. I just found out Danny is 62. He must Chi run to the fountain of youth everyday or something.

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After lunch, it was time to take what we had learned and put it into action. We did a million drills where  you would start by running in place, feet landing under hips. We would step according to the tempo kept on a metronome and the cadence was 180 bpms (beats per minute). While running in place, we would start to lean forward and beginning running for real.Danny reminded us to keep our legs moving behind us like a wheel. Knees should never drive forward. We did an exercise where we would run in place in front of a stone wall. If knees were too far forward we would scrape them. I was a bloody mess.

Through these drills, I started to get the feeling of what it meant to put it all together. For short spurts, I could feel my quick cadence and light steps. I could tell this was going to take a lot of practice, but felt I had the basics down. We also worked on how to keep your cadence the same but in increase your speed.

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Here, my knee should not be driving so much forward.

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Here, I need more forward lean and arm movement.

Clearly, I still have some work to do,but I’m getting there. It was a long 7 ½ hour day. I was pooped and overwhelmed by the end. I knew that I had some skills to take with me and to work on. The Chi Team gave me a couple of other goodies to help to keep me on track:

 

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I haven't watched the DVD yet, but I’ve read most of the marathon book.  I think this would be a very useful tool for the next time I train for a marathon.

After the fact: In the past two weeks I’ve really been able to move to a mid-foot strike and to increase my cadence. It is slow going and often quite frustrating. I am feeling other parts of my body react to the changes, like my calf muscles are really tight. I think that these are “good” growing pains.

One thing I do think should be emphasized more in the workshop is that running will not feel effortless immediately. It will take quite some time to implement the changes and for them to feel natural. I have to admit I’ve gotten kind of frustrated trying to be so damn patient and deliberate. I don’t think that Danny and the team drove this point home enough.

Conclusion: Overall, the approach makes sense for me, given my injury history. If you are running pain and injury free, then clearly what you are doing is working for you – “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” right? However, if you are finding yourself repeatedly sidelined due to injury, or you feel your technique is not as efficient as it could be, Chi Running might be worth checking out. Keep in mind that running form is only one part of the injury prevention equation. You also have to train smart, which means not doing too much too soon and recovering and resting well.

Have you attempted to make running form changes? How has this worked for you?

If you have been injured, what do you think was the cause? For me, I think it was a combination of poor form and training errors.

SUAR

Note: The opinions expressed in this post are mine and mine alone. While the Chi Running people paid for my workshop fee, I was not asked to do a review or encouraged to write certain impressions of the day.

107 comments:

  1. That looks like an awesome workshop! I run in Brooks PureCadence as well, love those shoes :). I am a natural mid-foot striker but up until January, always forced myself to run the "right" way. I had no idea that mid-foot striking was acceptable until I started frequenting some running forums and saw that people were actually trying to transition to it.

    This was eye opening for me. I had been dealing with repetitive stress fx and knee pain through my running "career" and could never get up past 12-15 mpw without hurting.

    So in January I ditched my shoes with the built up heels and let myself run naturally. I've been running 5-6 days per week since then and now am running 40+ mpw with guess what? No pain or injuries! None! It's amazing :).

    Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  2. i always subscribed to the 'aint broke don't fix it' mentality but the truth was, i was always 'broke'. I might check out the book --thanks for the review!

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  3. This is such a great post---especially for someone who is just starting to run! I've been following your experience with Chi Running, and I noticed that a lot of the elite runners are using techniques that you're talking about.

    Sarah
    www.thinfluenced.com

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  4. I'm sooo jealous! Would love to do a workshop with Danny some day. I've been working on my chi running form for awhile and - you're right - it's slow going. However, I've seen significant progress. I run faster and my "chronic" IT issues have disappeared. Now, if I can just get my hips to rotate properly. :-)

    Happy chi running!

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  5. I just have to say that I love your blog. You keep it so real! I'm a beginner runner and doing my first 5k this Saturday. Very nervous! I started running because I'm determined to not walk the entire Tough Mudder course this year. Thanks for this post as it gives me more info to help with my running. I did notice on my last few that running from the core felt good and made the the running slightly enjoyable as I didn't feel like I was forcing my body to run.

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    Replies
    1. Good luck with your 5K!! You are starting out as a much smarter runner than I ever was. Let me know how it goes for you.

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  6. Sounds like it was a great class!! I only started running last summer, and I knew I had to make a change within the first month or two because my knees hurt so bad. I was heel striking in motion-control shoes.. did a lot of research on the natural running style.. shifted to some barefoot, but mostly minimalist shoes.. with the key thing being a zero drop flexible shoe.. made all the difference.. I'm not a fast runner, but it sure made it fun and enjoyable and has kept me going :-)

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  7. great posting.......ever since I heard about Chi Running, I've been interested in learning more. Think I'm going to add a few somethings to my birthday wish list!

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  8. I used to get shin splints and knee pain, so I started running in Vibram Five Fingers last year. As a result, I had to adopt many of the changes you discuss above (midfoot strike, lean forward). I think I learned quickly in the VFF's because there's very little room for error -- if I ever resorted to my old form, my body would tell me instantly. I've just now started running in Merrell Pace Gloves (also minimalist) for trails and I love them so much. Anyway, I totally agree with you that running this way feels so great. I don't know if it's ever completely "effortless" but it definitely does feel much easier.

    BTW, the calf soreness -- I got one of these little foam rollers and it's great for lower calf and arch massage. (the small gray one)
    http://www.thera-roll.com/

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    Replies
    1. Roll, roll, roll - that calf tightness can mess up the Achilles if you don't take care of it!

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    2. Yes, I've been rolling. Also had the calf dry needled and that helped tremendously.

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  9. I would have loved to attend that workshop. Next time you hear of something like this, let me know. I'm a firm believer that changing my foot strike helped resolve my heel issue, but I know I still over-extend and would love to have someone look my running.

    Glad things are improving for you. It just takes time but you are making huge strides. Pun intended! :)

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  10. I just ran my first marathon in March and I changed to a 'mid-foot' strike during the training leading up to the marathon. I'm now dealing with a stress-fracture in my left foot and I'm not sure if it came about from the increased mileage, new running 'form' or if maybe I was doing something else incorrect during the mid-foot transition. I was definitely a heel striker before.

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  11. Very cool! I'm already a mid-foot striker and tend to take short, quick strides anyway, but I ended up with a nasty IT band injury a few months ago and it's just now starting to go away (after a prescription anti-inflammatory and lots of ice and rest). I'm going to have to try this out! Thanks for writing about it!

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  12. When I first started running, I told my husband that my resolution was to "learn" to run and complete a 5K. He laughed - "learn" to run? Don't you just do it? HA! I researched a lot about form but I'm pretty sure I still have no idea what I'm doing. It just doesn't come naturally to me and, I'll admit, it's nice to know that a speedster like yourself also has to work at it. ;) I have a friend who is also a running coach and she gave me a few pointers (and I eavesdrop when she coaches my boys' cross country team). I haven't had any injuries but I'm pretty sure I still need to "fix" it.

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  13. I just read an article about mid-foot striking for the Ironman marathon. It was really enlightening because it described how the marathon of an IM is different and that athletes need to be prepared to do light heel striking because it will happen.

    With fatigue goes form. It is inevitable so if you are trained to do light heel striking then you will have less risk of injury at the IM marathon.

    Interesting stuff and we are always learning aren't we.

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  14. Thanks for this post! I've been reading Chi Running lately- I got it for a buck at a used books sale. What dummy gave that away?

    My first half marathon attempt was fraught with aches & pains. I was so glad when it was over. Attempt 2 & 3 were much more successful and I actually ran less. My hips still protest when my weekly mileage gets too high, but I think I'm starting to figure it out.

    I gotta practice my lean! :)

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  15. How cool to go to a workshop with Danny! Love the chi running style, it's what I try to do. The right shoes (that allow you to feel the road) make it a whole lot easier to stick with good form. I used Nike Free 2s all last year and switched to Brooks PureFlow at the beginning of this year, and just doing that helped. Of course, when I'm tired, it's easy to slip back into heel striking without realizing it!

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  16. Thank you for providing on your feedback on your experience with ChiRunning...Ironically, I had just been looking for information about it last night. I have been suffering with various injuries (IT band, PT said I had weak glutes and quads, paid right under my toes on long runs - mainly on the right side, knee issues and most recently, heel pain in the right foot). I just completed my fourth half marathon for the year and now need to concentrate on training for my full marathon in October. Something's gotta give. I'm desperate to work on correcting whatever it is that I'm doing. Definitely would like to pick up the book...

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  17. I went to a "Good Form Running" clinic last month - two hours on two Saturday mornings. It was basically a simplified Chi running. Video analysis of my gait showed that my cadence was already fairly close to 180 bpm, but I tended to sit upright, or almost lean back, as if my upper body is just going along for the ride, and that I was sometimes a heel striker.
    My first couple of runs after the clinic I felt like a much more efficient runner. However, I'm now dealing with some nagging aches and pains that are making running much more of a struggle. Last fall I had some nagging plantar fascitis which finally went away....now it seems to have morphed into a different bruise type pain on the inside of my left heel. I also now have high hamstring pain which my chiropractor suggested might be a result of a more rear kick. She adjusted the hell out of my sacrum the last time I saw her, which helped a lot, but now the pain is back. My last few runs I tried to run in a way that felt natural, really only focusing on the cadence and on keeping my arms relaxed and back. It was still a slow struggle. I'm also not thrilled with my shoes (my last pair was Brooks Glycerin, fairly heavy) which are the Brooks Launch. My feet just plain hurt, like an old person's. Sometimes I want to take a few weeks off, let my nagging aches and pains go away, and hope that my running form with 'reset' itself somehow.

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  18. Thanks for sharing! I know I over stride when I get tired, so I am working on that right now!!

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  19. Great information. I know Miss Zippy has mentioned this too and something I likely should look into as a PF sufferer. I never knew that tip about bending your shoes!

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  20. Great post with lots of fantastic info.
    My husband has the Chi Running book and I've read some of it -- I try to always concentrate on the "falling forward" piece and I do mid-foot strike.
    I always incorporate it at the end of 10Ks and shorter races when I'm really hurting, and it makes running feel so much easier.
    I need to re-read and immerse myself in the technique more, because I bet I could improve.

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  21. I'm so, so guilty of over-striding. But I feel like I'm putting way too much effort in for minimal return when I deliberately try to run with a Chi-type form, specifically with the foot under the hip-line.

    I wish there was a way to measure the energy in/results-out ratio of a runners stride, like what we do when we measure watts-output on a bike.

    Yes, I'm a geek.

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    Replies
    1. I agree - I am kind of where you are in terms of way too much effort. I hope it gets easier.

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    2. My wife, Vanessa, has longer legs than I do, and yet she runs with an insanely short, quick stride, perfectly mid-foot. And it's easy for her. I try to run with the same stride and it kills me.
      So, yeah...I hope it gets easier, as well.

      Delete
  22. yes I have the book and the dvd! It's hard to remember all of this when I'm running though. I keep trying!

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  23. awesome post! I've been running in Newtons for the last 2 years and they've helped me immensely but I feel like it's time for me to try something else. They've almost become a crutch for me, as much as I love them. I haven't had any issues with them at all but I think I'd be much better off if I could actually train my body to run properly. You've convinced me to look into Chi Running.

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  24. I've taken two classes in chi running, but I'm not sure everything I learned stuck. However, I do like the idea of gravity doing all the work, and me just putting one foot in front of the other, to avoid falling on my face.

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  25. Excellent blog. Had to share on my Facebook. I've been having issues with my form also. Think I need one of these workshops myself. In the meantime, my hubby will try and help me.
    Information you provided was very informative.
    Thanks.

    Mrs White
    http://bringingfurmanhome.blogspot.com

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  26. The me from two years ago would not believe this but...I would love to learn better running form!

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  27. I did the whole "Chi" Running thing a few years back. Like anything it has its positives and negatives. I know there has been many success stories, but I think one detractor (in my opinion) is some of us need the constant feedback of the coaches over a period of time to make any worthwhile changes.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, good point. It is so hard to make the changes and make them correctly without feedback.

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  28. Great post! I have taken two half-day ChiRunning seminars here locally, and I have enjoyed both and taken something away from both. I think ChiRunning is the way to go, but it is extremely difficult to implement changes to running form. I find my focus falters quite frequently, especially when tired. However, being someone who is often injured, I needed something to help me get past that. I think they have helped!

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  29. I have changed to more of a fore foot strike which has slowed me down a little, but I'm trying to save my knee.
    I am little confused on the chi running. If your foot is landing under your hip, how are you moving forward? Did I miss something?

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    Replies
    1. You are moving forward because you are leaning forward, gravity is pulling you that way. Your legs are part of the forward motion to carry you along. Landing under your hips is not a Chi Running element only - any instruction on good running form would tell you that.

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  30. I switch to ChiRunning and flats about 6 or 7 years ago. I have chronic shin splits that basically stopped my running and killed my first marathon training. One class with Danny was all it took. I've never looked back. :)

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    Replies
    1. Wow, great to hear, sounds like it's really worked for you. There IS hope.

      Delete
  31. I feel like I have been broken since my ankle sprain :( this is a VERY interesting post - I need to check it out.

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  32. Thanks for the review. There are a couple of Chi Running events locally that I would like to go to. I watched the DVD a year or so ago, but have no clue if I'm doing it right. The thing I've never been able to comprehend (maybe it's hard to understand, maybe I'm dumb) is the cadence thing. I always read about cadence being 180 steps per minute regardless of speed, but that makes no sense to me. If you are a slow runner, you wouldn't have as many steps per minute as a faster runner, right? Do they go over this well in the class? Maybe I'm over thinking it. Yeah right, as if I could over think something!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, read the section on "gears." Cadence or steps per minute doesn't change. To increase speed, change the length of your stride. I think it's a touch concept to implement for sure!

      Delete
  33. I really liked Chi Running. Been meaning to read it again, and review form. I think about it when running, especially when I get tired and sloppy.

    Injury, right knee meniscus. I honestly believe it was from getting out of the car. That twist and push, you know the one. I'm a lot more careful now.

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  34. Very good article, really like to reading.

    If you want to read more about running with great resources I use regularly go to www.fromtheouchto5k.com.

    Happy Running, Carrol

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  35. You look fantastic! Your lean in particular is really nice. You've worked hard and it is paying off. Really excited for you--you'll be amazed at how much better your body feels.

    Danny is fun, isn't he?

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  36. So I'm coming back from hip surgery and working A LOT on proper core strength and alignment. While my injury was due to a fall, I do think that being able to run safely post-surgery will be aided greatly by maintaining a strong core. I used to not worry at all about ab and hip strength and now it is the main focus of all of my workouts.

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  37. Excellent post. I haven't taken a chi running class but I think I would like it. I can't imagine a 7 hour workshop totally on form. I agree with this guy about Newtons. I bought a pair and took their class and I thought it was fine. But after running in them a few times I gave them away only because I couldn't imagine having to think about my running stride that much at the end of a marathon when I can't think straight at all. But I know they work for lots of people. Good luck with your form changes.

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  38. Great post about Chi Running. You are so lucky to train with Danny. I've read his books and the video is well worth watching! I had surgery over the winter and used that recovery time to really focus on my chi walking and I really think it has helped in my running form. I too was plagued with runner injuries and with this new form, I'm pretty much enjoying pain-free running. Good luck with your recovery!

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  39. How great that you got to do a workshop with Danny! I've been working on my Chi Running for a while now. I did a one-on-one workshop with one of their certified instructors and it really helped a lot!

    Hope it helps you!!

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  40. I took the workshop September last year the day before the Chicago Half-Marathon. PRd by 2 minutes, then another 6 minutes 4 weeks later. I'm a convert! Now working with a local instructor, Mo Willis, here in Chicago.

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  41. I have the book and it's hard to put what he writes to work. It's confusing to me. I should look into going to a workshop.

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  42. I've been working on chi running since January. I have definitely got the overstriding/heel strike nipped and my cadence is quicker but not 180 yet. The lean + posture is what gets me. I still spend a great deal of my runs having to think about it. I have fleeting (1/4 mile typically) moments when I can feel it all in place. So, yeah, it is taking awhile unfortunately.

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  43. hmmm...interesting about the knee not coming up too high...I may be guilty of that. I had my running gait analyzed a couple of years ago (I was a SERIOUS heal striker)- and as with this, it took a lot of practice but now it is second nature. I just kept it simple- started with 2 minutes per run doing it the 'new' way then built up each run till it became second nature.

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  44. I read ChiRunning a couple months ago and have been focusing on my posture and alignment. Just the little bit of tweaking I've done so far has nearly banished the knee pain I thought was just a part of getting older and running longer distances. I've also switched to a thinner-soled running shoe. Today I did my longest run in them -- almost 8 miles -- and felt great. I'd love to attend a workshop when I have the opportunity.

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  45. I think you're onto something:
    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/new-emphasis-on-running-style-to-limit-injuries/

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  46. would you suggest reading chi running before jumping into the chi marathon book? i'm doing a couple of half marathons this year and would like to perfect (as much as possible) a comfortable form.
    thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  47. would you suggest reading chi running before jumping into the chi marathon book? i'm doing a couple of half marathons this year and would like to perfect (as much as possible) a comfortable form.
    thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  48. would you suggest reading chi running before jumping into the chi marathon book? i'm doing a couple of half marathons this year and would like to perfect (as much as possible) a comfortable form.
    thanks!

    ReplyDelete
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