Tuesday, June 26, 2012

How to Run in the Heat and Not Die

Quiet! Did you hear that? It’s the sound of runners complaining about the heat. Six months ago it was about the cold. We certainly are a predictable bunch of cyclical whiners, myself included. In fact, I like to give people the finger when I run in hot conditions.

irongirlfinish

Iron Girl Triathlon – August 2011 – 95 degrees

When I was racing in 90 degree heat on Sunday and doing the run portion of my triathlon, I started to get that weird goose bump/chill thing that signals the big “H” - heat exhaustion.  I had taken my Hammer Endurolyte Tabs (life savers – I use these during all of my summer races and even tape them onto my bike). I had tried to hydrate enough.  But when you are out there for hours in high heat with little shade, it can be tough to stay ahead of the game.

Fortunately for me, I was almost finished with the race and dehydration would not become a serious issue. After crossing the finish line a huge bottle of Gatorade an some time in the shade did the trick. However, it’s important to remember that once you are very dehydrated or are affected by heat exhaustion, it is difficult to come back. It could take hours and sometimes even days.

{source}

So, be smart. Don’t take the heat lightly. Here are some tips to keep you running outside even in the hottest months.

  1. Run at 1:00 a.m.
  2. Steal a coffin from the local funeral home and fill it with ice. Plant it somewhere along your run for when you get overheated. I think ultra runner, Scott Jurek, did this at Badwater, so it is the hip thing to do.
  3. Soak your underwear in cold water, then freeze it. Wear it for your next run. Or, just stick ice packs down your pants.

In all seriousness, here are some tricks to try before you just shut up and run:

  1. Strip down. Wear as few clothes as you can without being arrested. Wear light colored, loose, wicking clothing.
  2. Run first thing, or after the sun starts to set. Avoid getting out there between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
  3. Adjust your pace. Slow the heck down. Ideal running temperatures range from 50º-55º. For every five degrees above that, your performance can degrade 2%.  This means that if you are running in 75º  heat, your pace could slow up to 10%! Humidity might make it even worse. Don’t expect you can or will perform the same in the heat (from a study done at Team Oregon).
  4. Do 6 every 15. Try to take in at least 6 ounces of liquid (not including Bud Light) for every 15 minutes of running. Plan your routes where you can replenish your water, or hide it along the way.
  5. Think trees. Or, big buildings. Try to plan your route to include the most shade possible.
  6. Skip the beans and peanut butter. Avoid excess protein intake before and during the run. Protein metabolism produces extra heat (source).
  7. Run with your down coat. If you are planning a race in a hot and/or humid climate, try to acclimate first by mimicking race conditions the best you can. To develop and maintain acclimatization for a race in a warmer climate, assume that each layer of dry clothing or degree of coverage, (i.e. going from short to long sleeved shirt or from shorts to tights), is equivalent to 15 or 20 degrees in temperature (source).
  8. Replenish lost fluids and electrolytes after a run. Some people even weigh themselves pre- and post-run to gauge how much liquid they have lost. If you are doing especially long runs or are running for consecutive days in heat, add salt to foods and select foods high in potassium like bananas.

Where do you live? Are your summers to hot that running in the summer months poses a huge challenge? Colorado is generally pretty cool in the mornings for running. Lately, we have had a string of 103º heat, so even the mornings are a challenge. Usually, however, a run before 8:00 a.m is perfect around here.

Do you have any tips for running in the heat that I haven’t mentioned?

Have you ever been severely dehydrated or had heat exhaustion/stroke from running in hot conditions? No. Knock on wood.

SUAR

82 comments:

  1. Great stuff - and very funny! Running tonight - so if you hear a thin whine coming from south of town you will know that is me!

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    1. Ha!! At least you whine thinly. That's less annoying.

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  2. I didn't know that protein produces excess heat. I am going to keep that in mind this summer.

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  3. I have gotten the chills/goosebumps thing just once so far ... it was freaky. Fortunately, it was at the tail end of 8 miles and I was close to home. I just new it was related to hydration - and I had a whole 20oz Amphipod on that run too, go figure. I do have to say, we've been running in fairly high heat for almost 2 months now out here in the Midwest and you do start acclimating. It's never 'great', but you get a little more used to it. I ALWAYS take hydration, even on 3-4 milers in this heat!

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  4. One of the hundreds of reasons I love living in Seattle is that our climate is runner-friendly year round. We have had a couple of days over 70 so far and that is about it.
    Will definitely file these tips away for when I am running on vacation this summer!

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  5. I'm in Northeast Wisconsin, and we've had a really unseasonably warm (read: hot) spring and early summer so far. I can't think of any additional tips, but I seem to be helped by drinking a large glass of Gatorade about an hour before I run. Great tips!

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  6. Good tips! I just completed a 16 hour relay in over 100 degree heat index (in Wisconsin for crying out loud!). My livesavers were constantly switching off sipping water and gatorade, eating popsicles on my down time, and the ice water soaked sponges that I put in my sports bra.

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  7. I'm guilty of the whining, especially since moving back to the Southeast. I'm from here originally, but I've apparently been gone too long. This humid hot crap is killing me! But I'm slowly getting there. And by slowly, I mean my running is slow as hell. But, at least it's happening. Thanks for the protein tip, that's one I didn't know!

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  8. Ick, I loooathe summer running. Our weather forecast this morning was literally, "..we have a cool front moving in that will dip temperatures down to a high of 110 today." agh!

    It was 87 degrees at 4:30a.m. this morning.
    In an act of desperation last summer, I wet my running bra and shorts in water, and put them in the freezer for my run the next morning. They were frozen solid, ha! What an idiot! Running through sprinklers is the only thing that helps me make it through the runs. I am always done running before the sun rises which makes for some early wake up times.

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  9. I'm on the Gulf Coast and the heat and humidity makes running during summer months quite challenging. Practicing Bikram hot yoga has helped me acclimate, but it's still tough.

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  10. Great tips! Thanks! I just love how you can always treat stuff with lots of humour :D
    I try to run before the sun rises. Here in Girona (North-East Spain, near Barcelona) it is very hot and humid in Summer plus we're being hit now by a heat wave. I drink lots and try to stay off the sun as much. I wear a hat and take it easy.
    I have never been (knock on wood too) severely dehydrated or had heat exhaustion although I can tell I perform even worse than normal with the heat. My first tri this season is on July 22nd, in Barcelona, no shade to be seen... Will have to make sure I'm and stay well hydrated!
    Stay cool!

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    1. I'm also racing in a tri on July 22. Who does that? :-) "Hey, let's pick the hottest month of the season and go work hard, even better, let's PAY to do it!" People just don't get it. :-) Good luck!

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    2. It's because you are all so damn hard core!

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  11. In sacramento, the summer temps routinely go into the 100's up to 112 on some days. I am now doing bikram yoga and it has helped enormously with the acclimatization to the heat. It feels downright balmy at 95 degrees.

    Yes I have had head exhaustion as a college student many years ago. It was horrific.

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    1. Head exhaustion! That's awesome. ..sorry ; (

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  12. East coast of VA and the humidity is thick enough to make you swim that run. I carry a water bottel and either run in the evening or on the treadmill :/
    The first time I ever had an issue with the heat was playing tennis last year. I have never been so hot and was told I was so red it was scary. I felt terrible for hours.
    The races I have run recently have been in the morning but the last one was pretty hot. They offered cold towels after the race.

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  13. So that's what those goosebumps are? I got those at mile 18 of the 2010 Chicago Marathon. And, yes, it was because of the heat. Blech.

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  14. Got heat exhaustion at last year's Summerfest Rock N Sole 1/2. Felt like puking by mile 4, had those goosebumps at mile 10 was angry and disoriented by the finish! I also "tried" to be smart about hydration but it was no match for the 115* heat index. We didn't start until 8:30 and I was sweating standing there. They didn't black flag the race until 2 1/2 hours in (I was at mile 10, with my sister who was running her first 1/2) we walked A LOT 1) because she was NOT trained and 2) we were trying to also be smart! The course was hilly and provided no shade until about mile 10. They re-vamped the race this year and it looked awesome, I didn't go back for more. It was PERFECT weather (I live in the area) but people STILL complained about the heat, I want to punch those people. My heat exhaustion kept me out of running for 2 weeks and out of any serious running for almost a month! FAIR-WEATHER RUNNERS need to stay on their treadmills!

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  15. The move to KY has been rough. Not to say that it didn't get hot in MI, where I moved from, but it is hot here, ALL THE TIME! I have gotten pretty much used to it. My last race was in the 90s in MI, and honestly, I didn't feel like the heat got to me that much. Nearly PRed. Training it it helps a lot. I have been doing a lot of running indoors too, BUT, it is still hot inside. It has been over 80 in the mezzanine of the gym where I prefer to run, because there is a window to look out. That window also makes it a bit hotter, but it is still cooler than outside and I have unlimited access to water. Call me a wimp, but I ran long with my kids in the stroller a week or so ago, and they ended up drinking all my water because THEY got hot, just riding. Blech. It was ugly. very ugly.

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  16. I run on the tmill most of the time. :) Prefer too cold to too hot tho. My DH freezes his drink bottles and holds them in his hand - but it's a balance/repetitive motion issue. Just found a gel pack you freeze and strap on to palm today for him to try from the Trigger Point people but it's not even on their site yet. Popsicles and frozen strawberries after, plus washcloths waiting in an ice water bowl in fridge.

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  17. I live in Alabama...home to some serious heat and humidity. Even at 5:30p (typically the time of day I'm headed out for a run) it can be in the mid-upper 90s during the summer--and we're not even going to discuss humidity! My solution to acclimating? Just getting out there and doing it. I have learned to adjust my expectations on performance and know when my body starts feeling "weird" to back off. There are sometimes when I retreat indoors to the treadmill if I need to but I like to think that I see the dividends in the fall/winter by feeling stronger/able to run "faster" paces, etc.

    Unfortunately I have had a couple of heat-scares (not including the chills), one of which was last week. I was coming up a monster hill at the end of a 5-miler and it was like my blood sugar/electrolytes just tanked. I was squirting powerade on myself out of my handheld in an attempt to cool myself down--that's how desperate I was. (Truthfully I thought I was going to pass out as my hearing/vision were starting to "go") Luckily, we were back at our cars so my running buddy rescued me with a Gu and after sitting for a little while and letting my systems regulate I was OK.

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  18. I didn't hydrate properly for a half and paid the price. I had the chills and my ears felt almost plugged. I walked a lot and drank at every water station but that didn't help. I did make it across the finish line but got very sick. I felt like it was going to come out both ends. I call that one my WR (worst record). I'm in northern Mn and it's a hot one today- I'll run later when it cools off a bit (with my hydration pak).

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  19. Consider me educated ... never knew about the avoiding protein guideline. I use a sports drink that includes protein. Wonder if I should cut that back or water it down in the heat of the summer. Things tend to get a little toasty and humid here in NC for the next few months. At the very least I should probably stop packing the turkey legs in my Fuel Belt.

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  20. Back before seven-and stay on the shady side of the street/path. Tucson. But it's a dry heat .

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  21. This is a great reminder! I had forgotten about protein raising your body temperature!

    Sarah
    www.thinfluenced.com

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  22. Great tips - I didn't know that protien was a no-no before heading out. Will nix my PB pre-run! (Also, I was at the Athleta Iron Girl Boulder, too, working the Athleta tent - I definitely remember the heat last year for your race!)

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  23. I live in Sacramento Ca and it gets pretty hot here (not AZ hot, but 110). I've been running in the upper 90's and it's hard. I take it slow and steady and it pays off when it gets col and I see my pace.

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  24. So, basically, I have permission to run in my sports bra even though I am still carrying some "baby" weight on top of the amazing six pack I KNOW is there? THANK YOU! Seriously, I am swimming in the outdoor pool tomorrow morning and running right after that for an hour. I planned a "leisurely" bike ride with my niece just to get some pedal time in and some heat exposure without overdoing it. My half iron tri is in July. This weather could make my last 25 days of training interesting. I should get used to the heat but no dying. That would suck as I already paid the race fee and told all my facebook friends to come watch me race. Thanks for the tips.

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  25. I have that my runs have been a real slog fest for the last few weeks. I am wondering if the increase in heat and humidity are the cause? How long does it take to get acclimated? I live in SE Iowa, so its not hot hot, but the dripping humidity kills me. Running in the morning helps before the heat sets in, but that is also when the humidity is the highest. I run in the shade, go slow even when I hate it, and have found water fountains along the way. Thanks for the tips!

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    1. I think it takes 10 days to three weeks. Hang in there, keep at it. Maybe do more frequent, yet shorter, runs.

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  26. Freeze your underware? Genius! There are shirts that are made with removable tubes that you freeze. They are like $60. My tip is to hydrate the day before a run. This is not hard for me because I chug water like it's going out of style.

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  27. Excellent list to which I'll add 3 words: Frozen Water Bottle.

    If I don't freeze my bottle, the water is bathwater warm within a few minutes. Frozen it stays cool for at least a couple of miles. :)

    PS - I have had heatstroke (once) after one of my first long, hot hikes in the desert. Not. Fun. At. All. (And not a mistake I plan to ever make again.)

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  28. I almost melted to death in Saturday's Slacker race...seriously stomach problems, dizziness afterwards, and the icing on the cake: blood in the ol urine. I have been hospitalized twice with severe dehydration so Saturday was a bit freaky, but all ended fine. Definitely need to drink more when I'm not used to this crazy heat!

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    1. Jill that is so scary. Glad you are okay, but wow.

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  29. Frozen water bottles are the best for hot weather! One of those helped me survive the Skirt Chaser which was around 105 at 5pm. I did have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and some salty chips before and ended up feeling great and didn't dehydrate at all, which left me feeling fine and ready for the beer after!

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  30. I didn't know about the protein...thanks for the tips! It's been a hot season for me so far and I don't think it's going to change any time soon.

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  31. I live and run in the SF Bay Area. I'm pretty sure I lost my heat/weather complaint privileges the minute I left the mid-Atlantic.

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  32. The worst for me was the RnR half in DC this past March. Trained all through winter and race day was in the upper 70s almost 80s. I felt so sick post race. Couldn't eat, felt so hot, head hurt so bad. It makes me wonder if early spring races are worth it because here in Virginia March can mean anything when it comes to tempeture.

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  33. I was always a minimalist runner -- I swore I'd never get a fuel belt. Not long ago I bought a 70 oz CamelBak intending to use it on my ElliptiGO. Guess what -- it's awesome on long runs! I fill it mostly with ice before a run and it's small enough to be relatively unobtrusive, plus I can stask some energy gel in it. I know it's not conducive to proper running form but in weather like this hydration takes precedence over form.

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  34. Southern Ontario Canada where the summers are hot & the humid is high!! At least it has been for the past few summers. We'll see if this one is a repeat. Most of my runs are done in the evening, but I've been trying to get out on weekends in the early morning. That seems to be working well and I always carry fluids on my long runs even though it's a pain! Better that than dehydration. My next event is a 30k in mid August in downtown Toronto - that will be hot - yikes! Hoping to be prepared.

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  35. its plenty hot in upstate ny but running on the trail makes it infinately more manageable .

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  36. I'm a huge wuss about heat. It's the one good thing about injury right now--I *have* to exercise in the gym most of the time. I did have one outdoor run last Tuesday and it was already hot at 8:30 a.m. (Golden Ponds Park), but I was so grateful to be out there at all that I didn't whine even once. Now if it's going to be smoky AND hot....well, I still won't whine, because at least my house is safe....

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  37. I didn't know about the protein thing. Thanks for sharing. I'm in the south and it's hot and humid, my runs are suffering for sure. I was trying to be a real wuss last night and blame a sucky run on my current injury... it's as much the heat though.
    Thanks for sharing these tips!

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  38. I went out on a 6-mile route in 92-degree heat on purpose yesterday - sort of an experiment to see just HOW much I'd have to slow down to run the whole thing, only stopping for traffic lights. A run that normally takes me 45-50 minutes took a full hour in the heat and sun. And I was chugging water for the rest of the evening. I think that people who have been running for a while will struggle MORE with how much they have to slow down in the heat than novice runners. So I would say: Don't overestimate how well you can cope with the heat, even if you've been running forever and ever!

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  39. LOL! Loved this post! I live in Alabama, and it's hot here right now! Super hot. I don't think I have been drinking enough water either so my legs feel like cinder blocks when I run-BIG cinder blocks. :)

    Shannon
    http://www.irunreadteach.wordpress.com

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  40. At first I thought you were serious about running at 1 AM...my mind was already reeling (before I kept reading) in an attempt to figure out how in the world I could adjust my schedule to run at that time of day. Ha!

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  41. I ran a marathon in dangerous heat way back in the 1970s. I thought I had learned my lesson. Then I ran a 50K trail ultra six years later in even more extreme conditions.

    Beware of the heat because it can be deadly. But there is another perspective to consider. At my 50K, I drank excessive amounts of liquids before and during the race. I may have dodged a bullet because too much water can kill you ...

    http://naturalrunningcenter.com/2012/04/17/health-risks-drinking-water-racewater-beware-intoxication-hyponatremia/

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    1. Yes, less common, but hyponatremia is a concern as well.

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  42. You bet I'm whining over here, but the brutal New Orleans heat does prepare me for the random 90 degree Boston marathon. Maybe it's a good thing.

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  43. On Saturday I had that chills/goosebump feeling you mentioned and I never even thought about it. Now that you mention it, I think that's the first time that it has ever happened to me-- freaking LR in these CO temps!

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  44. I live in central Arkansas where heat and humidity are just about guaranteed from June through August. Definitely makes for miserable runs, especially long runs.

    One tip I didn't see mentioned is to fill a Camelback or other hydration pack the night before and place it in the freezer. (I only do this for long runs.) The water inside doesn't freeze completely, but it will stay cold for several hours. Having ready access to COLD water helps a lot to keep your core temperature down.

    And yes, I have suffered the heat exhaustion. Last year when training for my first marathon I did a 15 mile training run in the August heat. The first 10 miles went okay, but things turned ugly in the last 5. The last mile I was in some sort of near-catatonic state and only finished because my friends were there to follow. Once I got home, the heat cramps had seized me and my entire body would convulse into positions that I could never get into under normal circumstances. I laid on the cool till floor for several hours enduring the spasms to recover. My wife watched me that day and wondered how on Earth I would ever complete 26.2 if 15 had this effect.

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  45. I love your "tips". I needed that laugh - thanks! It was 104*F and humid here in Jersey last week - treadmill weather :( It's not uncommon for my long Sunday run to be done in 90*F, but I take it slow & bring a bottle full of ice & a sports drink.

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  46. I live in Central Virginia... summer here means upper 90s and humidity so think that you could swim. In past years I have completely wussed out on even attempting to run in the heat but this year am trying to acclimate myself and it's painful. I hate waking up early so usually I just take the easy way and run on the treadmill instead.

    You will hear no whining from me about cold weather though. I LOVE running all winter long. I guess I make up for it by whining twice as much once the temperature goes about 75. =)

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    1. I moved to CO from Richmond and running there was BRUTAL. My condolences!

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    2. I had no idea that you had spent time in Richmond! Colorado must seem like heaven, comparatively.

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  47. I really enjoy running in the cold for some reason! The humidity is really killing me lately. Thanks for your suggestions - I will set my alarm clock for 12:30 AM and run tomorrow at 1:00 AM. Done and done!

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  48. I live in SE KS and it is HOTT and HUMID! Temperature reached close to 110 yesterday from what I heard around town.. definitely NOT my ideal running weather... I waited till about 7:45ish to head out for my run... I definitely did not try to push it at all! I kept it slow and before I knew it I had ran 4 miles and was completely drenching in sweat.. YUCK!

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  49. My tip for running in the heat is to take a cool shower before my run, and then braid my soaking wet hair down the back of my head. This is extremely helpful if you have thick hair because the wet braid stays wet during the run, and the cool water dripping off the end of your braid runs down your back. It makes wearing a cap more interesting, and sometimes I feel like Quasimoto with a giagantic lump in the back of my head, but its also nice to not have the massive ponytail bobbing up and down as I run. I have also been known to bring two very cold H2O bottles out with me, one I drink, the other I pour on my head, which seems to be the biggest source of my sweat production.

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  50. I have suffered both heat exhaustion and altitude sickness. It takes you off your training for a good week! I find soaking my shirt helps! Keeps my body temp cool. Listen to your body, know the signs and never feel bad for slowing down or backing off. It will save you in the long run.

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  51. We are a bunch of weather obsessed group of peeps aren't we! GREAT post as usual and I NEED to read this as I am adjusting to NE heat AND humidity. That's okay, I'll take it over cold anyday.

    Thinking of you and all the CO residents.

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  52. I do not do well running in the heat. I ended up in the medical tent getting IV fluid for 2 hours after the St. George Marathon last year. I even hydrated the entire race, took Electrolyte Tabs and other fuel, and still ended up dehydrated. No fun!

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  53. Oh man, I struggle greatly with any temps above about 70 degrees. Have had heat exhaustion several times and it is not pretty! Now I am a bit apprehensive about even trying again. I get red-faced and feel sick so quickly, just have never been able to adjust. Inside it is for most of the summer. But thanks 'Anonymous' for the idea of taking a cold shower first. That will be an idea I try. And I will be investing in a camelbak soon, having extra cold water may allow me to try running outside during the summer again. My husband on the other hand can run without any issuess in the almost any heat, he actually loves it! But he needs two pair of gloves below 40 while I need none until about 10-15 degrees or lower.

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  54. I ran a 50K in Auburn, Ca. on June 16th in triple digit heat. I packed my sports bra with ice at every aid station, carried a water soaked bandana, and popped S-Caps like candy. I also adjusted my pace, walking to conserve energy. I ended up 5th out of 19 finisher-numerous DNF & others dropped to the 25K.
    Running Boston 2011, I was dehydrated and after finishing I ended up in the medical tent(amazing operation) with an IV!!! They were awesome & brought me my finishers medal while I was getting "juiced up".

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  55. I live in Charlotte, NC so it's definitely hot and humid here! It's supposed to be 100* on Friday here so I'll probably stick to the treadmill at the gym. It's been tough to run outside especially because I'm stubborn and run after I get off work around 5:30 because I don't want to wait until 7 or 8pm to run! Luckily I've never been dehydrated or had heat exhaustion, but I have a 10K in August here so I'm sure it will be quite steamy! I'm planning on running my first half in October in Atlanta and my first full (hopefully) in November in Savannah, but I feel like it's going to be hard to train in this southern summer heat!

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    1. I live in the heat hell of North Carolina too. LOL!! Not far from you actually in good old Burlington.

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    2. I'm with you as I live in Atlanta. 92 degrees today that lasted well into the evening hours....like 7:30, 8:00pm! lol

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  56. we run through the summer in St. Petersburg, FL and we find that if we cut our distances down to about 6 miles for a long run, we keep our fitness up and in the fall when things cool off we feel like superheroes for training through the heat and can then ramp up our distances for the late fall/winter races without much difficulty.

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  57. Great tips and love the humor:)

    Really no reason not to get out and run here in San Diego,Ca.

    Yes, I have been severely dehydrated and hospitalized both times:(

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  58. I live in heat hell......known as North Carolina. I am Canadian born and raised, so three year ago when I started running again and it hit the hot summers I thought I would die. Now I have adjusted and become smart about how I cope with the heat. Although I must admit I love your "giving people the finger" comment. I laughed out loud at that one. Also perhaps I will try that coffin idea. Hey, like you said if Scott did it then it has to be cool. LOL!! Most of what you pointed out are rules I try to follow. If all else fails we have a treadmill in our house and I hop on it.

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  59. Another shout out from the Southeast - Atlanta, home of "Heat, Hills and Humidity". I'm not a hot weather lover under any conditions, so hot weather running is especially tough for me, and more so as I get older! I carry a Nathan handheld bottle whenever the temps are over 70 degrees, and I set out on my runs before 7am. We are expecting triple digit temps in the next few days, so I have decided it's time for me to take a long-needed break to see if a persistent case of plantar fasciitis will finally clear up. I'll be hitting the yoga studio (and going on vacay with the family) in the interim. Struggling through run after hot run can be demoralizing. I hope after my break I'll be enthusiastic about running again, because we'll have hot days through September.

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  60. Fill up 1/2 of your water bottle the night before and freeze it. Add cool water the next morning right before your run. I have a amphipod fanny pack (grrrr.......dorky) but after my 6 mile run this morning at 6am (b/c I live in VA Beach where its hot and humid at 8am) and I still had ICE in the bottle. But I force myself to go out in it early so it hasn't been too bad. Also....your kids boo-boo packs you get at walmart/target??? Fits GReAT inside your sports bra to cool your core either before or after a run!

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  61. I live in inland Southern California so yes summertime running is rough. I work long days so lunchtime runs are essential. Ive just been keeping those runs short and bringing a little water bottle along. I should have known better but I signed up for a half last week and this weekend. The one this weekend is in the high desert - do you see where this is going? Forecast calls for 97 degrees as a high and it will be 65 at sunrise before 6 am. Race starts at 7 and I am pretty slow, so it is going to be a hot one.

    I had severe hydration during my first leg of a Ragnar Relay earlier this year - scariest run of my life!

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  62. Something else to think about, using Non Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), such as Ibuprofen, isn't recommended for endurance sports, especially when it's hot out. Studies have been linked to dehydration and even kidney failure.

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  63. I live and train here in hazy, hot, and humid Naples Florida. I ran the Keys 100 in May and purposely trained at noon 3 times a week to prepare for the extreme heat I would experience during the 100. I actually enjoy running in hot weather, as long as I plan my water stops and keep hydrated. I found that Fizz electrolyte replacement and sCaps!, help get me thru the many months of 90 plus degree temps. BTW, lived in Chicago for many years and hated the cold, so happy to be away from that.

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  64. Agree here, thankfully it seems parts of the country (at least the midwest) have cooled off. But more hot weather is sure to appear before all is said and done.

    http://runneracademy.com/running-in-hot-weather/

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  65. I was volunteering at a triathlon and a girl came through our aid station extremely overheated. She had been running in a running cap - the thin kind that allows moisture wicking and cooling to occur. One of the aid station volunteers took her hat off her and told her to run without the hat, that the hat was causing heat to be trapped in her head.

    I would have thought (and I suppose the triathlete did too) that wearing a hat during a hot, sunny race would help keep some of the heat from direct sunlight off your head. Right? I would never be so bold as to tell an athlete what to do in a situation like that. My suggestion, which was not taken seriously, was to sit in the river and cool off. Instead she let me pour water on her head and on her back, and eventually she went on to finish the race (or at least she left our station).

    I noticed you are running in a hat.

    I have only done one triathlon but I am preparing to do my second, and many, many more. I remember how hot it felt to get off the bike, take off the helmet and start running in what felt like stale, stagnant air. I do not run as fast as I bike, so there was no wind. :)

    Also, I borrowed an image from your blog and made sure to link it back here - it was a great photo of you (I presume) lying in the grass after a race. It fit my blog perfectly.

    Thanks for the post :)

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  66. LOL Love this post! I am totally guilty of the whining. Matter of fact, I was gonna go for a run earlier today but the temps would not die down below 92 degrees...even at 7:30pm! So, nope...this chick backed out. lol But I need to learn to not let it stop the show all the time because I do enjoy getting out there and hitting the pavement.

    Erica

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  67. Ran a non-race 5K this week in 105 degree heat index, part shade, part sun. On the sun side of the loop, I started "cooling from the inside out", not chilling. It sort of felt good, but sort of freaked me out. Is this heat exhaustion? I think it's just so early in the hot season that my body wasn't used to sweating early enough in the run. It felt like an "easy run" more or less, flat terrain, no stress and a light breeze. The kids are out at tennis camp during that time. I figure if I'm making them work in it, I can too. Did wonder what the heck was going on with my body, though.

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  68. Its been 104 here with 80+% humidity.Running in this has been a challege. lots of gatorade and water for me. and usually have to start and end my runs with something sugary ( type 1 diabetic- which makes for an even bigger challenge). The only thing that really keeps me going is knowing that crossing the finishline at my next triathalon will be so worth it!

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  69. These are such an awesome tips that you have given and I would definitely recommend

    http://www.apparelnbags.com/athleticwear-athletic-shorts.htm

    for some good athletic apparel.

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  70. Great article!! Here’s another way to stay cool when the summer heat becomes unbearable...Kryoskinz Cooling Patches (kryoskinz.com). We’re a small startup striving to help athletes everywhere beat the heat and suffer smarter! Check us out!

    ReplyDelete