Monday, June 4, 2012

The Top 3 Reasons Running Is Bad for You (Or Not)

If I had a dollar for every time I heard someone say that “Running isn’t good for your body,” I’d have a ghost writer doing this post for me and I’d be laying on some topless beach in Greece.

I understand why running gets such a bad rap - something to do with all the pounding and impact and injured people. Yes, there are risks associated with running, like there are risks associated with any sport. Yet, to make the blanket statement that it is “bad for you” seems a bit naïve.

The thing people don’t take into account with running is that it does not have to beat up your body. It can actually strengthen the tissue, the bones, and the tendons if proper rest and adaptation are allowed. Let’s face it: running stresses the tissues. But, if given time to rebuild, those tissues actually become stronger.  The key is moderation, rest, recovery, sensibility.

Another reason people think running is bad for you is that they are afraid. Very afraid. Running is difficult. Although I’ve had moments of effortless running, I am usually wondering when I can stop because it is that hard. I think some people try it, see how hard it is and react by saying, “I don’t want to do that anyway, it’s bad for you.”

So, what’s all the fuss? Let’s look at some of the reasons people say running is  the devil’s work:

1. People die running.

People die tying their shoes on the curb in New York City. People die eating grapes and choking to death. Yes, you will hear of someone dropping dead during or at the finish line of a marathon. I’m sure you learned that famed ultra runner, Micah True, died recently while running in New Mexico. His cause of death was cardiomyopathy – an enlarged heart.

RIP Micah True (with Guadajuko, the Ghost Dog)

Don’t panic. You have to keep in mind that these deaths are almost always due to a pre-existing heart abnormality or heart disease. So, don’t be stupid and ask your doctor before training for an endurance event.

In fact, did you know that over all runners live longer and stay healthier longer than couch potatoes? People who rarely exercise are fifty times more likely to die of a heart attack during vigorous exercise than those who exercise five times per week. Overall, fit men are half as likely to die of a heart attack than the classic “couch potato.” So, your odds are pretty good that running will lengthen your lifespan, not cut it short.

2. Running is bad for your  knees and joints.

You can see why this is a widely held belief. After all, with each step a runner’s knee takes up to eight times the force of the runner’s bodyweight.

Researchers at Stanford University wanted to know more about the actual long term affects of running on the knees and joints. 1,000 runners and non runners were tracked over a period of 21 years. None of the participants had arthritis when the study began. As you can imagine, many of them developed this condition over the life of the study. In 2008, the results were published. It found that runner’s knees were no worse than non-runners knees, regardless of the number of miles that the participant ran (study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, 2008).

Yes, this is just one study on just one sample of people. But, it was a comprehensive and long term look at the effect of running on the knees. And, the results were pretty darn optimistic for the running camp.

It is important to note that when cartilage in the knee is compromised, it doesn’t necessarily come back stronger. This is why it is essential to train smart and to listen to your body. Once you damage that cartilage, you might not recover fully.

As for joints and bones in general, studies have found that running actually increases bone density and can in fact reduce incidences of arthritis. As is reported by the American Running and Fitness Association, “Osteoporosis (the reduction of bone density) affects more than 200 million people worldwide. Luckily, weight bearing exercise, running is the best example, are the ideal training strategy for promoting and maintaining bone health. A study done at the University of Missouri has found running to be more effective then resistance training on promoting and boosting bone density.”

3. Running will lessen the quality of your life by crippling you and making you unable to move properly later in life.

Yes, endurance runners might have some aches and pains as they age. Hard to know if they would have had these anyway as they got older. I know many people in their 40s and 50s who do not run, yet are plagued with back pain and joint pain. It’s called getting older. My belief is that running keeps things moving – blood, oxygen, poop. It keeps the tissues alive and on their toes. It promotes energy and confidence. It gives an extreme mental health boost, a surefire way to combat some depression that can accompany aging and life transitions.

100 year old runner, Fauja Singh, entered the Guinness Book of World Records
for being the oldest person to finish a marathon (Toronto Marathon, 2011).

The above-referenced Stanford study also found that runners experienced less physical disability and had a 39% lower mortality rate than the non-runners. After tracking runners and healthy non-runners for 21 years, starting when they were at least 50 years old, researchers found that “the ability to perform activities of daily life like getting out of a chair and walking was better among runners than non-runners. And 19 years into the study, 15 percent of the runners had died, compared with 34 percent of the non-runners.”

Put that in your pipe (or turban) and smoke it!

Are you often told by non-runners that running isn’t good for you? How do you respond? I just shrug and tell them it makes me happy anyway. I’m not going to debate it unless someone really wants my opinion.

What do you believe is the most significant risk associated with running? Without a doubt, overtraining.

SUAR

Sources for this post:

From Guru Magazine: Is running really bad for your knees? A personal trainer explains
From TIME Health: Is running bad for your knees? Maybe Not.
From Muscle Prodigy: Is running bad for your joints and bones?
From US News – Health: 3 Myths and 1 Truth About Running and Your Health

96 comments:

  1. I have yet to meet an "older" runner who is worse off for running than better. Frankly, the ones most likely telling us that running is "bad for us" are stocking their shopping carts with cases of soda and processed foods every weekend. Don't get me started on this topic ... ugh! I can't tell you how some of my 'non-fit' friends have tried telling me things about running. Seriously?!?!

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    1. I started running 9 weeks ago I'm 47 I'm feeling the benefits I am following a structured running programme and doing things gradually but still my co workers cant wait to tell me what a bad choice of exercise this is for me and yes you guessed it these are people who don't run and don't enjoy running surprise surprise!!

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    2. @Christina I feel For you! I'm not a runner (yet?) but I feel the same way when fat out of shape people ask me "but where do you get your protein?" since I am a raw foodist. It should be obvious that I get plenty of protein since I'm healthy and have no Problem building muscle.

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    3. I'm only in 7th grade, but I run. I love to do it and I'm great at it. I hear this sometimes and it makes me scared because running is a huge part of my life. If I ever need to quit running for a health issue, I will, but it would be super depressing. I've been meaning to look this up but I didn't want to because I was scared. I'm glad I read this. Thank you!

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    4. There is not enough compression in my compression pants to keep it all together; everything just jiggles:(

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  2. Yes, I get told this too. Usually by people who hate running.

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  3. We could die doing worse things for sure. If I die running, then it was just meant to be. SAme with flying in planes or horseback riding or whatever. You can die doing just about anything. Or you can sit home and do nothing. I'll take my chances with running.

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  4. Well thank you for this. Running makes me feel good.

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  5. Head coach of my marathon training team is 67 years strong and can run faster and longer than me. I hear it all the time, and I think, you're right, what they are really saying is, it's too hard. I smile and go on my way. Running has changed my life, both physically and mentally.

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  6. Yes - I hear it, from friends who are staring down heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes as they smoke their Marlboro reds, stuff their faces with donuts and sit on their fat asses…

    I'll take my chances with the running.

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    1. I hate it when people ask me how I can smoke and run--not at the same time of course--but still, it really chaps my hide.

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  7. Someone recently told my chubby butt that it wasn't good for me to hit the pavement and jog. I, in turn, told her it wasn't good for her @ss to hit the couch and to turn channels all day long...

    I don't think we're friends anymore. ;) lol

    Great post!

    Sarah
    www.thinfluenced.com

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  8. Most of the time I don't really say too much, but yeah you hear it a lot...especially about the knees.

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  9. I love fauja singh and did a blog post on him last year! http://trikarentri.blogspot.com/2011/10/this-is-awesome.html

    He reminds me of my grandpa...

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  10. I get told it All.The.Time. From my mother most of all. I just tell her "Shh" cause she wont listen to a word I tell her anyway. She's right and that's all there is to it!

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  11. Great post! I've had a few people (non-runners) tell me that running was bad for me - and mostly I either ignored it or laughed.

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  12. Thank you for reminding me that running is supposed to be hard. I've been struggling mentally and physically (freaking PF) with running lately and feeling sorry myself thinking why can't it all just be a little easier?!

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  13. I haven't heard it recently b/c I think people are wising up to the health benefits. My husband says he won't run b/c it's too hard on his knees. I've learned (the hard way) that it can wreck your knees if you aren't careful to do some training (besides running) on the muscles around your knees. Or if you overtrain. But having come back fully from "bad knees" I know what's possible. I had WAY more aches and pains before I started running.

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  14. Ugh...I hear this all of the time! I can't tell you how many people tried to convince me of NOT running a full marathon. And smoking doesn't cause lung cancer right?

    I usually pull the "osteoporosis" card- runs on both sides of my family, I am a slightly taller, thin-built woman so I hit every risk factor. Both of my grandmothers literally snapped bones sleeping or after a mild slip that should have only caused bruises so yes, I will run and yes I will have stronger bones and no I will not break my humerus rolling over in my sleep.

    The end.

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    1. Please don't be so sure that running will protect you from osteoporosis. Get tested. I'm a lifelong runner and was totally shocked to find I have osteoporosis. Maybe it would be worse if I didn't run? I will never know. But I also have several friends who are also runners who also ended up with osteoporosis. Running alone may not be enough to protect you.

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    2. Yes, true. Just b/c you run doesn't mean you are protected. There are many other factors at play, especially genetics.

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  15. I don't hear much of this stuff, but I do have one sedentary neighbor who loves to go on and on about how bad it is for you. I keep my mouth shut, but I'm dying to point out to her that studies show sitting on your ass is much worse for you than running ever could be. One day she'll catch me in a bad mood and it'll all come flooding out!

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    1. i know!!!!! i have a friend who's bfriend goes on and on. Thing is, if its so bad how the F did i lose 40 pounds in the past year and you gain 50? hmmmmmm. Hey i understand running isnt for everyone, but let's not put someone down for finding passion in something.

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  16. I don't really hear it that much. I mostly hear excuses about how people "wish" they could do what I do. And then they drive off in their golf cart instead of walking. Sigh. I personally, at 52, have been a little concerned about what all this running is going to be doing to my knees, specifically, a decade or 2 down the road and am glad to see studies have been done. I already have damaged cartilage and take the famous G and C which render me pain free. OFf to read the study.

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  17. I don't necessarily hear that running is bad for you from people I know. I do hear a lot of:
    1) "I can't run, it's just not possible. It's too hard."
    2) "I have knee/back/ankle/shin/eye issues. I am too scared to try running for fear of hurting myself."
    3) "I don't have time to excercise. I work 40 hours a week, have a kid, a husband, and love to watch TV shows on my DVR."
    My responses are:
    1) "Yes, running is hard. At the beginning. However, if you want the most bang for your buck for losing weight and getting fit, try jogging/walking intervals. Ease into it. As long as your doc okay's it. Check first."
    2) "Wow, I see my chiropractor weekly for my back/knee/neck issues and I'm able to run 20 plus miles a week, plus train for my half iron man. Maybe you can check with your doc to see what you CAN do if you think running may not be a good fit."
    3) "I work out during my lunch hours, before my hubby and I start our 40+ hour work week, and while my son naps. I can also run on the TreadMill or do my core work while I play shows from my DVR. Fit it in when you can."

    I hate excuses. I am unable to make any original ones for myself to bow out of a workout because I've literally heard it all. Running isn't bad for you. Sitting on your arse is. Just sayin'.

    The biggest risk with running is doing too much. Take a day off.

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  18. Wow ... look at you with your well researched data rich post and nary a reference to bathroom activities. I hardly recognize you.

    Biggest risk with running: addiction.

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  19. Thank you for this! I'm not even anywhere near the level of most runners, but I routinely feel like I have to defend my running. I had someone ask me recently, "When will you be able to be done with all this running?" as if I am pining away for the day after my next race. I just looked dumbfounded and said, "I hope I don't ever have to stop...I really enjoy it so I wouldn't want to stop." That sank in, then they asked about the knee issue. I told them that if I ended up needing knee replacements I would likely have needed them anyway...my grandmother had to have her hips and knees done and there is a genetic component to joint health. I also said I didn't personally know any runners who had had to have knee replacements but I did know lots of overweight people who had to have them.

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  20. Just about *everyone* asks me if running gives me trouble with my knees. (Some of them actually TELL me that I must have trouble with my knees!) To be fair, I started when I weighed 200 pounds (now 50 pounds - and couting - lighter). What surprises them (and even me) is that I USED TO have trouble with my knees - when I was young, fit, and not overweight. Yet now I don't have trouble with my knees. Of course, I am always following a training plan, so I'm getting faster and stronger because I'm doing it "right."

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  21. I get it very often and most of the time just smile. If some response is unavoidable I usually say at least I know I'll die healthy and enjoyed quality life till the end. I agree with over training as risk and also wrong training. A lot of runners try to do the same type of exercises and training as elites and their bodies were just not made for it.

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  22. When I told my dad I was thinking about running a marathon he said, "Well just keep thinking about it. Running that much is hard on your knees." I told him that no, actually being 50 pounds over weight is hard on the knees. He shut up after that.

    I have started to use this blunt approach more often. I found it was the same people coming at me again and again to tell me how bad running is. Yet, here they are overweight couch potatoes. It didn't matter how much I tried to educate them on the benefits of running. After using a more blunt approach they leave me alone about my running.

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  23. I'm often asked when I'm going to "give this up?" My answer is - as long as my body allows me to enjoy running, there is no reason to "give it up!" I don't understand the mind set that running is something that you need to stop doing once you reach a certain age or attain milestones, like become a mother, wife, etc... it's a way of life. Thanks for writing this and sharing the research!

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  24. I don't get the running is bad for you conversation anymore. I just laugh at these assholes when they tell me that.

    I think it all stopped when I started saying: so let me get this straight. Living with less stress and being healthy is bad for me compared to smoking, drinking, and eating garbage while sitting on my couch? Is that what you are telling me?

    When you do it with a NY attitude and look of: go ahead shithead tell me I'm wrong they generally don't continue with the conversation.

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  25. I'm with you. But articles like this one will give the naysayers more excuses for not running:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/04/ultra-marathon-heart-bad-exercise_n_1567868.html

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  26. Luckily we live in a running community so no one dare mention ill effects of running. Besides, the folks that would are also the ones complaining about our government banning super sized sugary drinks.

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  27. I always consider the source. If it's a person that doesn't exercise at all and has their own health problems I smile and ignore them. If it's a person that used to run but had to quit, I may pry for information about what happened, i.e. recurrent injuries. Maybe I can learn from them.

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  28. I started running at 53! I was an overweight couch potato, and I have been told by those near and dear to me how bad running is for me. To them I say: I'll die trying...not lying. I now run a tad over 5 miles 5-6 days a week...and yep it's killin' me! LOL! My knees hurt before I ran, now it's healthy pain, my back hurt before I ran, now it's healthy pain...etc. Is it harder to run than take a handful of meds to stabilize my blood pressure, diabetes or other things? Is it harder to run than have my feet amputated from the effects of diabetes? Is it harder to run than to go blind? And from my dear friend who has stage 4 breast cancer...She would love to run and have the effects of her chronic illness be reduced or eliminated. SUAR!

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  29. I hear this pretty often, but usually just ignore it. They've already made up their minds about the issue, so even if I presented study results, I'm sure they'd just ignore it. Their loss!

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  30. My MIL told me it would make my uterus fall out. I told her I was done having kids so I didn't need it anymore anyway.

    She still goes on about how I'm ruining my joints and will be crippled when I'm older, but I can usually count on her for cool running stuff for my bday so I just nod and smile and tell her it makes me happy.

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  31. Yes - people tell me that all the time. And are concerned because I was "never really athletic" growing up so I should be extra cautious. I chalk it up to them being jealous that I found something I enjoy and work out.

    For sure - over training! I try my hardest to listen to the body!

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  32. My husband and I debate this regularly. I am SO excited to show him this post (with research cited and everything!!)! He seems to be under the impression that I run to burn calories. Prolly because that's why HE does it. He humors me when it comes to training/racing, which is more than I expected. And I am rather proud of myself for not saying, "I told ya so!" when he ran for 2 miles straight last week (after insisting he couldn't do it). I'm really trying to get him to do a 5K with our boys. I think that'll do the trick!

    PS Have you BEEN to a topless beach? Would you go? Just curious...

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  33. Ugh! Great post! Yes, I hear this too. My co-workers are Dr. Oz worshippers and think they are healthy because they pop 50 suppliments (Dr. Oz recommended) a day as they wheel over to the filing cabinet in the chair instead of getting up and walking 5 feet. My boss said recently that running is stupid and so is anybody who does it - she wasn't talking to me but I was standing there. And she knows too because her brother used to run every day and he just had to have foot surgery. Seriously, how rude?! Often at this job I hear that song from Sesame Street run through my head "One of these things is not like the others. One of these things just doesn't belong..."

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  34. I look at those people that have been running late into life, and those that don't, and I want to be more like those that do—happier and healthier. It can be discouraging to see articles that say that running is bad for one reason or another, so I try and balance that with my personal experience and those that I've met. So, I'll keep on running.

    Happy running, all.

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  35. I had a trainer at a gym tell me running was bad for me, except when it was only five minutes on the treadmill before a strength workout. I basically tuned him out after that and will NOT be buying one of his training packages!

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  36. Loved this post! I just smile at the people who say those things, because you're right, running is hard work! Some days it's easy and some days it's a bitch. But I continue to get out there and push myself to keep going. I love to run, it's not always fun, but I love it!

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  37. I love this post! There are so many nay-sayers out there! The truth is that runners, even as "bad" as running is, usually do more than those nay-sayers to stay fit. Great post, and even kind of motivational!

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  38. My dad always says that runners look so haggard. If by "haggard," he means "super hot," I totally get it.

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  39. I'm suffering with runner's knee at the moment. Not because of running, but because I refused to rest adequately. I've been running for 30years. This is my first running injury. I'm half-crazed, but would be full-crazed if I didn't run. Working very hard at rehab & strengthening xrczes to get back to running.

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  40. I just had a non-runner tell this past weekend that there is a point when enough is enough. Really?! Sure I might run a lot, but who's to say my regime is too much? I get a lot of comments from people who knew FatJosh who think SkinnyJosh is too much of an extreme. But, all I do is just smile and nod and not let their limitations bound me.

    But, I think the biggest risk of running is not just overtraining, but being too careless on the roads. I also try to make sure I'm clear on all directions from traffic (car and bike).

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    1. I must agree with you....same thing happened to me. I went from 150lbs to 123lbs and had lost to much weight....i was not looking to lose more....but the thrill of running was so over hte top that i could not stop. The Runners High" thats what i think they call it. I had to cut back my routine a bit and start to eat a bit more - epople thought that i had gone to far!!

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  41. hear! hear! love this post!!

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  42. Thank you and thank you again! What really struck me was the aches and pains. I started and stopped running so often because I have bad feet. Sticking to running has improved my feet aches, in fact I was taking it easy after my marathon and I noticed this morning that my feet felt achey; I took that as my sign that I need to start running harder again.

    AND if I'm going to die suddenly, I'd rather do it at a marathon finish line than on the toilet or something.

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    1. Hahhaha!! On the toilet would be the worst. Kind of a propos for me, but still much rather die running.

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  43. I get that a lot from my sister-in-law who emails me news articles/studies about the risks of running or about someone who died while running. It's funny she doesn't look for studies and articles in which people die while sleeping or sitting on the couch or gardening or whatever. I've also had several people tell me, "Oh I could never be a runner" or "I wish I could run" I don't think they understand that all the runners they know had to start somewhere. People see what they want to see and believe what they want to believe.

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  44. I love this post! Running also is good for my mental health, I am less likely to punch somene in the face at work if I start my day with a run!

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  45. I just listened to a Fresh Air episode with Gretchen Reynolds, who writes the Phys Ed column for the NY Times online. She basically agreed with everything you stated in this post. :) And it was great to hear! However, she also talked about how bad high heels are for you and wear them about 45 hours each week. EEK!

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    1. yeah, gotta ditch the heels even if you probably look very sexy in them.

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  46. Being a new runner I began trying to find other locals that I could get info on (though my Uncle is a marathon runner and helps plenty with training plans and what not) and their stories. I enjoy both the humor of your posts (A lot of them talk about poop) and the serious side. Thanks for this. I personally have lost 30 lbs in just under 3 months and feel running is a great stress reliever and helps make your body stronger and better since you use so many muscles. I look and feel better and people notice which is a good thing. Hope you do well in your triathalon. Congrats for deciding to not overdo it and NOT doing the other one this past week.

    If someone told me running is bad for you, I'd point to what happens to your body being overweight and the difference I feel. Plus, I wrestled and played football and coached both and can tell you that the reason injuries happen is due to muscles not being trained properly for the activity you are doing. I never got injured because I lifted and stretched my body to handle those things like anyone should.

    One thing I haven't read is the dangers of drivers and running along the many wildlige. Those are my two biggest concerns when running without a sidewalk and by myself.

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  47. You know what boggles my mind is how much my relatives like to tell me how bad my running habit is for me. Luckily, I can turn it around and point out that they yelled at me when I was a smoker, and now they're yelling at me because I'm a runner. Once I punch that hole in their debate against running, they get real quiet and leave me alone :-D

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  48. Doing too much is what gives running a bad rap.

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  49. I do hear how bad it is, usually from some fat ass at work who is eating a chicken wing while stating this so called fact. If I have an ache or pain, it's because of that damned running. I have rheumatoid arthritis and have had it for over 10 years, but compete around 30 races a year! My doctor is on board with me running because it keeps me fit and healthy, unlike so many I see in his office. I agree that overtraining is a bad thing, and we all fall victim to it at some point in our running life. My goal is to be that old ass runner giving all of the critics the finger as I cross the finish line!

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  50. In 20 years as a physical therapist I have had very few joint replacement patients who were runners. The patients who get hip and knee replacements are mostly sedentary and overweight.
    I did have a patient just today: a 95 year old woman who gets on her treadmill 6 days a week and does 10 min running and 10 minutes walking. She takes one blood pressure med and vitamins, lives independently in a retirement community. She's my hero!
    Yeah, I'm going to keep running.

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    1. Great to have your input as you get a perspective that many of us do not have. That 95 year old is my hero too.

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  51. My triathlete patients are in kind of crappy shape, but the runners are usually on the "one injury a year" cycle, kind of like me. But fewer chronic conditions occur in either group compared to the sedentary.
    For some reason I've seen a rash of injuries from bike falls in the triathlete group, but usually I think they're pretty well-rounded and less likely to be injured.

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  52. Great to hear that I'm not the only one who doesn't run effortless :o). But it are thos runs who make it all worthwhile!!!

    Kath

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  53. I love your creative posts!

    YES! all the time I hear the, "but it really wears done your joints doesn't it?" Well, so does a fat ass!

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  54. I mostly agree; however, some posters here seem to dismiss the reality that some people do get injured. I LOVE to run. Used to do it every day. I still dream about running. I tore my meniscus; I actually believe the running did not cause it, but expanded a tear from an acute injury. Since the surgery, I have not been able to run without pain despite attempts various types of attempts. I can cycle. I practice martial arts. It's not a matter of being sedentary.

    I'm certainly open to the assertion that running is not necessarily worse for you than anything else. But every sport/physical activity creates different stress. Individuals need to pick what doesn't harm their particular body.

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  55. I have and when they say that running totally injured them I reply, "Well, you must have been doing it wrong."

    BTW - I nominated you for a Lovely Blog Award today on my blog - mainemomontherun.com. You don't have to do anything...just wanted to let you know that I think you rock!

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  56. I just tell all the naysayers that it's even less healthy to the rest of my family if I don't run. Keep me away from sharp knives.

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  57. With ll the diabetes, arthritis, and joint replacements in my family (all of which are NOT active people) how can I NOT run?

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  58. I feel sad for those people who talk about how bad running is for you.
    They don't yet know the joy, the calm, the beauty, and the great physical feelings that come from running. Most of them are intimidated or scared by running, and don't think they could ever do it (or much of anything, because you only occasionally hear athletes who do other sports saying this).

    They feel the need to talk about running instead of staying quiet on a subject they don't know much about -- because for some reason they feel they need to defend the fact that they don't run.

    So I want more than ever to bring them into the fold, somehow.

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  59. My mom always tell me that people die running. People always like to say it's bad for your joints too. I tell them it's worse to NOT run.

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  60. I sit in an uncomfortable office chair all day and the only thing that makes my body feel better is running in the woods with my dogs after work. I look forward to that hour and a half of peace everyday.

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  61. I hear this all the time, in fact just last week from a Doctor. I said to him maybe but my resting heart rate is lower than my age, (50 in January 48 RHR). And that I just did a 1/2 ironman in September faster than I did 18 years ago

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    1. You're 50 with a RHR of 48? That's phenomenal. I'm 13 years younger than you, in fairly good shape, RHR 60 bpm. How do you do it?

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  62. You make some good points. Above all, runners are exponentially better off than couch potatoes. With that said, however, long distance running - when compared to other forms of activity (e.g. sprinting, resistance training) is inferior in terms of health benefits. And when you add in the risk to your heart, well...

    Nevertheless, I understand runners. It's a great endorphin rush and I feel great after running (even though I hardly do). But still, I'll take squats and deadlifts over jogging any day :)

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  63. Running and training for a 5K race is good for your health. Runnning a marathon is not. In the article you state that martathon runners are healthier and live longer than sedentary people. This is absolutely true. But marathon runners are less healthy and do not live as long as people who limit their exercise to say 5K runs. Excerise like everything else has to be done in moderation for good health. If a little is good that does not mean that a lot must be better. If you can only do things to extreme, than by all means run marathons rather than be a couch potato but run 5Ks if you want to run for your health.

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    1. So glad you said this. Keeping up the ability to do 5ks is healthy. Marathons are extreme & unnecessary and cause all sorts of trouble like blue toenails, overeating afterwards, etc. Moderation is good in all things.

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  64. So true! I get so sick of hearing that from ones that don't run or do any sort of workout. Or from the ones that participate in other sports and end up with back injuries yet I run almost everyday and I am perfectly fine. I want to send this link to all of those downers!

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  65. I'm an endurance runner and I've getting paranoid with all of the information on how running is bad online. Thank you for your post!

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  66. It is the malicious keyloggers that you should worry about - these types can be used to
    delete it, all which can be done by pressing F8 as soon as the computer is being monitored.
    Later he was released. The program does include a Help manual, as well
    as automatically deleted.

    Here is my website: Keylogger

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  67. Right after thanksgiving I was 240 pounds I went on a diet and I started working out and doing cardio (elliptical and Stairmaster) I have always wanted to try jogging but was too afraid because I have severe asthma. I refused to give up my desire to run and I started to try running on the treadmill after losing 45 pounds. I'm not going to lie it was difficult at first. I could only go a minute at first at 4.5 miles/hour but I gradually built up to where I could run for a long period of time on the treadmill. I was told it was much more difficult to actually run outside. But that was my ultimate goal. Finally I got up the nerve to actually run outside. I mapped out a 2.7 mile run that I told myself I was going to do no matter what. Well I did it ( with a few rests in between, I still am a beginner) and I have done it three times now, and I feel great every time I do it. So if a guy like me severe asthma can do it anyone can. I think it's all in moderation. Any one thing you do too much can be bad for you. You can't tell me that actually any type of cardio puts a strain on the body, and even lifting weights puts a strain on your body. So yeah exercise in general puts a strain on your body, But not doing nothing puts a strain on your body also. I would rather exercise, not only do you feel good but seeing results and weight loss is the greatest feeling in the world.

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    1. Your story is very inspiring. Running is difficult but it's so worth it and you push through the discomfort. Like that you mentioned moderation because running can be very hard on the body but everything we do is hard on the body. It's a fantastic workout so why not do something hard and reap tremendous benefits! Humans are built to be highly capable of running. Keep it up Mike :-)

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  68. I've been running for 27 years...and it is becoming harder on my joints. Hips, low back (I have to concentrate hard on my posture to keep my low back neutral, which adds to the work). YOGA is a must with my running. It makes everything balance out, for all-around physical wellness. Gets all the aches & pains out. Running can be very hard on the body, so moderation and/or good form is key. I NEED running (or step aerobics) in my life because the cardio is great for chasing away depression. The physical benefits, to me, are the cherry on top of the mental benefits.

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  69. 29 years ago I was horseback riding and the horse had a heart attack and fell on me. I got a skull fracture and my left side was affected. Fast forward sixteen years and I woke up partially paralysed on my left side. I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The paralysis disappeared but the side was still weak. I walked with a cane for almost thirteen years. I got rid of it two months ago. I started doing a combination of walking and running. Unfortunately, the left side has proven to be weaker than I thought and my knee is in pain now. I think it is due to weak muscles from all the damage that side has suffered. Once I get everything strong - I am starting a 30 day squat challenge on June 30 - I will be trying to run again. And btw? I turned 48 on June 26.

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  70. 29 years ago I was horseback riding and the horse had a heart attack and fell on me. I got a skull fracture and my left side was affected. Fast forward sixteen years and I woke up partially paralysed on my left side. I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The paralysis disappeared but the side was still weak. I walked with a cane for almost thirteen years. I got rid of it two months ago. I started doing a combination of walking and running. Unfortunately, the left side has proven to be weaker than I thought and my knee is in pain now. I think it is due to weak muscles from all the damage that side has suffered. Once I get everything strong - I am starting a 30 day squat challenge on June 30 - I will be trying to run again. And btw? I turned 48 on June 26.

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  71. http://beta.active.com/running/Articles/Why-Too-Much-Running-Is-Bad-for-Your-Health?page=2

    running is good for you but not excessively...people who run all the time like marathon runners actually increase the risk of heart problems/disease/failure. It is a proven fact. Articles (blogs) like these are bias and while there is some relevance to these claims. It is also important to do your research. (and I'm talking open a book and check several sources. Not just google a question and only click on one or two sources...Also look at your sources and who's writing them ^This guy...>me).

    I study ortho bionomy. It is the study of muscle tissue and acupressure to help push muscles and bones back into the correct place.... I work on athletes a lot. In runners, The number one problem I always see is bad feet an ankle placement

    Overpronation is most common in long distance runners (track, cross country/marathon runners) It is Where your ankle collapses and turns in without proper support. This can cause increasing damage if your running on them all the time. Corrective footwear only makes it worse in the long run because instead of training your foot and muscles to support themselves properly. It stops your muscles from supporting your ankle at all and relies on the shore to do all the supporting...Weakening the ankle muscles and tendons further.

    If you study human anatomy at all you'll know that muscles connect to one another, tendons (which connect to bone). poor joint and bone support and Your feet placement and the running effect your legs which effects your back and posture etc. Also because of overpronation your ankles are weaker and therefor your body starts using other muscles in your body to help move them substituting the muscles that are supposed to move them. Try moving your ankle up and down slowly with only your ankle muscles. Any flexing at the knees and calves or upper leg and abs will show you what's really working them. (never rotate your foot in circles. Your ankle is not a ball and socket like your arm it does more damage than good)

    My job as an ortho bionomist is to correct the muscles back to where they should be and forms of physical therapy that teach my clients to start re-using muscles (such as ankle) that your body quit using and instead is substituting other muscles in the body to use causing further damage.

    My job gives my athlete clients (pro, minor, recreational)a much longer shelf life on their field (running/baseball/etc). We even work on people with scoliosis fixing the problem permanently without a brace or painful rod in the backbone. (And yes the clients did consult with their MD and keep up with them during and after this correction process)

    It is an up in coming profession...Most common out in California but not even then very well known.

    Pro athletes are starting to become our number one employers.

    anyways, hope this helps straighten things out and makes you look at some of the reasons it is bad for your in access

    For more info on Ortho bionomy to check your sources

    http://www.ortho-bionomy.org/

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  72. My personal trainer told me that running will stress to my body and when body is in stress it releases stress hormone called Cortisol and instead of losing weight it will make me put on weight.

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  73. "Running ultra marthons can, if you're extremely unlucky and born with a heart dysfunction, possibly after 50 years of running, just maybe, kill you. Let's stay calm and safe inside the house where we're dying safely and slowly (but still faster than runners)."

    If you watch a TV you can get a seizure and die.
    If you walk you might trip and knock your head and die.
    If you drink water you can choke to death.

    Well, we should all stop having kids so nobody ever dies again.


    Some people are truly concerned, and cool, I guess we can appreciate that they care about us. But most are just ignorant fucks and it's frustrating.

    "Olympian wins the Olympic marathon"

    - He'll have knee problems when he's older
    Dude go back to class, and listen to the false and useless information they tell you, and then go die slowly on your coach at night and let your football team decide if you're gonna be happy or not.

    I'm not actually mad but, my paragraph sounds good so yeah I'll leave there.

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  74. I don't like running. I am in perfect shape. Healthy and eating healthy too. I do walking and here and there some exercise. I believe in do what you like and enjoy life.

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  75. Running is not what I will do. Other kind of exercise I am ready for.

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  76. Lawl running is 4 fegs who lik 2 be stupid. Runnung iz gaaaayyyy!

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  77. I think WALKING with a weight vest is MUCH more healthier. I have a friend 80 years old, who for years has been vegetarian, exorcised vigorously ran up to 8 miles a day, some days did just wind sprints, eats EXTREMELY healthy foods. VA just diagnosed him with bone cancer of lower legs, spine, hips not to mention prostrate caner. He even has no-gels on his lungs? The late Steve (Hercules) Reeves was a pioneer on the dangers of running on the body, he did run but not as much as we do now.

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