Sunday, November 6, 2011

Burned At the Stake

Let’s suppose there is a race that goes right through your neighborhood or is being held in your favorite city. You forgot to register, or couldn’t afford to, or simply opted out, but you want to run the race anyway. You hop in about a half mile after the start line, bib-less or with a fancy bib you made on Microsoft Publisher, and start running. Every couple miles you swig a bit of free (stolen) Gatorade at the aid stations. You bow out about a half mile before the finish line. You have no official time, you were never documented as a runner.

What’s the big deal? You just wanted to take a run down a public street for a bit and, hey, they were giving out free sport’s drink, so why not taste a bit? Yeah, the thousands of other runners around you paid $145 to run the race but they got t-shirts and timing chips and you got nothing. What’s the big deal? The big deal is…

YOU ARE A BANDIT! You should be burned at the stake or at the very least, castrated.

Hard to know if they are bandits or not. Maybe the bib is on the butt of the Speedo.

The Wall Street Journal ran an article yesterday that I’m sure has people all up in arms. It addressed the epidemic of banditry, stating that while it’s not illegal, its very much frowned upon. Peter Sagal, host of Public Radio’s Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me and blogger for Runner’s World recently wrote about how he ran as a bandit in the Chicago Marathon last month. He made light of it, thought it was rather amusing. His readers did not. He received hate-filled and incredulous responses like this one:

 “You took advantage of a closed course that other people paid for, took up space on the course that you were not entitled to, used resources at the aid stations (refilling your sports drink bottle) at the expense of registered runners, and now apparently feel no remorse or need to apologize for your actions. And you felt it was ok to do this because you are a "celebrity"? Because you are a host of a radio show on NPR? Because you write a column for Runner's World? As it turns out, all you are is just another self-absorbed jerk who thinks his importance justifies his actions.”

While most people spit venom, others didn’t see the harm in what Sagal did. “He ran on a city street with a bunch of other people to try to get his 20 miler in. Sounds like a good idea to me.”

Whenever I am questioning whether something is a good idea, like throwing a paper airplane or a watermelon off of a 29 story building (always tempting), I ask myself, “What if everyone did it?” Sure, one person throwing a paper airplane off of a building does not make a huge impact. But if hundreds of people did it, the streets would be clogged with litter. I think the same rule of thumb applies here. If one person runs as a bandit, while not “right,” it is relatively harmless. But if hundreds of people do it, we have a problem.

The other issue is fairness. Is it “fair” that you pay $145 to register for race or you bust your butt to get in through the lottery, while Public Radio dude hops in and runs for free? Doesn't seem right. Isn’t this the same thing as someone butting in line, sneaking into the movie theater or taking the HOV lane when they only have one person in the car? Banditry may not be illegal, but in my opinion, it’s still not the right thing to do. Plus, I’d be scared of getting in trouble.

Have you ever been a bandit it a race? Busted!! I had totally forgotten this, but Ken just reminded me that last year I ran 10 miles (miles 2-12) of a small local half marathon (not a charity run!) as a pacer for one of my running clients. Bowing my head in shame. I did bring my own fuel belt of that makes me any less of a schmuck.

What are your thoughts on banditry? No big deal or castration? Are there ever circumstances where it is acceptable?

SUAR

PS: Thanks, Dad, for being well-read and always pointing out the good articles.

62 comments:

  1. I haven't been a bandit, but also have never really thought of it as a huge deal. I know it's annoying to have extra people crowding the race, but I think that running is a healthy activity that everyone should be able to do, and not everyone can afford race fees. I think you should pay if you can afford it - but then again, there's no way to know if a bandit can or not.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think it's wrong, but not something I'd castrate over. It's the kind of thing that would make me somewhat change my view of a person.

    Having said that, I would think using the aid stations could be considered stealing...

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't that picture of Kathrine Switzer? Not a bandit in that picture, but a registered runner that had the "crime" of being female before women were allowed in the Boston marathon.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I would NOT ever bandit a race. I think it is very rude. All those people who work had to get in the race and those who work hard to serve those who are legally in the race deserve the proper respect.
    It is just selfish. RW has posted other stories about bandits, and I really question the judgement. I never really liked that blond chick from the view, but after reading about her stating she was a bandit in a race, she is lower down on my list.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Deb: yep you are right. Not a bandit, she had a bib. Just a woman and good for her. I replaced the picture as it is not "correct" in depicting a bandit.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It's sort of like the pacing thing...people pace people in marathons all the time w/o paying. If you consider pacing a bandit, I've done both...had someone pace me and have paced someone.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Bandits suck. They shouldn't be castrated, or burned at the stake, either, but a light caning might be in order.

    ReplyDelete
  7. eh not a fan. When Elizabeth from the view stated that she ran Boston as a bandit I thought she said she didn't run the whole thing just parts of it? I don't like her anyway but I know some people who have ran with friends for parts of races (not using the limeade crap or anything like that) to help people get through certain miles.

    I read that article last night and posted it to. I don't like the idea of running it, using resources, etc. Just seems sucky. The swag bag from Chicago for $145 sucked ass so really that's the part people who do Chicago should be pissed about.

    I was surprised by the numbers of that one race where they had almost an extra 1k finishers! Now that's insane!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Banditing a whole race & getting a medal you have to qualify for like Boston or that you have qualify or actually get in through a lotto like NY is very wrong imo. They don't give out medals to people without bibs right? or tags right?

    ReplyDelete
  9. ONE SHOULD THINK OF THE REPERCUSSIONS OF
    THEIR ACTIONS, BECAUSE SOONER OR LATER IT WILL
    COME BACK AND BITE YOU IN THE BUTT.THESE
    BANDITS OR SO CALLED RUNNER'S HAVE NO ETHICAL
    STANDARDS AND IT DOES TAKE AWAY FROM THOSE
    WHO HAVE TRAINED HARD TO ACCOMPLISH THIS RACE.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Boston seems to plan for bandits (or the term I have heard used "Back of the packers.") They usually give them a bib with the year on it, and they are allowed to run behind the paid runners. They cross a separate finish line.

    ReplyDelete
  11. If the bandit isn't thieving drinks, swag, or unearned rewards, it seems harmless... at first.

    BUT, the organizers didn't work their tails off to plan an event for banditers.

    It's especially an asshole thing to do if the profits of the race are going to a charity. The purpose of the race would be to raise funds for a specific cause, and to take advantage of the venue without helping out the cause kind of stinks.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have never been a bandit, nor will I ever be. I agree with the other comments that it is not fair to the runners who have paid, and it isn't fair to all the workers/volunteers who have planned for x amount of supplies/runners.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Having been a "bandit" in many races, I of course do not think it is not a big deal, (let the castration ensue). Here is how i choose which run i will or will not pay for.

    1. The main qualifier is if it is not for charity!!!
    2. In my town the courses never change so if i have run the race before.

    I also will never take water or sport drink or use any resources put out for the runners that paid. I do agree that is stealing. I usually just hop in about .25 miles into the race and skip out the same distance to the finish line. I also pay for many races because like most runners i love getting a tee-shirt and having a time documented.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I would not ever run as a bandit. It's stealing plain and simple. My momma taught me better than that. The amount of work, expense (past issue of Runner's World broke down the costs of organizing a race and as a contributor you would think he was familiar with this information)and volunteers is amazing and extensive. To think that this 'runner' feels that he is special and can run it for free is appalling. If he can't afford it, maybe he should get NPR to cough up some entry $$.

    ReplyDelete
  15. If you "join" a race and take any of the food or drink or goodies that are for the paid participants, you are a thief, pure and simple. Using the port-pottie when there is a line up IS grounds for castration, or whatever the female equivalent is.

    If you "join" a race that is run on a course not normally open to runners (and the same goes for swimming and biking for triathlon) then you are taking advantage of something you didn't contribute to. In other words, you are a thief.

    If you are running in a place where one can normally run, and suddenly find yourself surrounded by a ton of people wearing bibs, I consider that to be happenstance. Just don't take anything at the aid stations, don't use the porta-potties, and stay out of the way.

    Now, if you plan to run the same course as a race run on public property used for that purpose, you're being a bit of a jerk, but nothing worse, since you are taking up space that another racer wants to be moving through. It would be mannerly to be staying out of the way. And don't park your car in the places where the race staff told people to park.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I would never bandit, but I've been an unintentional bandit. It's probably not an issue with larger, publicized races, but for smaller local 5ks, they frequently use the same route that goes across a well-known pedestrian bridge. I've been running and come across a race (once even 30 seconds before the start) and the only way to continue on my run is to cross the bridge with the racers.

    It annoys me because it's a large pack of people going slower than I would, crowding up a small bridge and making it difficult to pass. I usually just deal with it, but it is irritating.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Baditing Boston or NYC is worthy of castration. Those races are a bitch to get into and a privilege to run.

    Getting in your 20 miler (with your own fuel!) at a not so prestigious marathon, I think, is no big deal. You're not getting a medal. You're just making your morning run a little more interesting.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I will be doing the PF Changs RNR in January,my first full distance race. I will happen to run past my friend's backyard with 8 miles left to go, and asked her to run the last 8 for moral support. She's going to bring her own water, and will not cross the finish line. I don't think there's anything wrong with that.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I've never done it. I was recently appalled to find out my sis and her husband do it all the time. Mostly small local races, but still - I don't agree with it. I'd say at a minimum you are taking up space that you didn't pay for. Just doesn't seem fair or right.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Just pay for the race people! Or run somewhere else..very easy.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I think it's wrong. However, I think being a pacer is different. You are there for support, and as long as you do not attempt to finish, take a medal or use other resources, I can live with it. But, it's probably better to just sign up anyway and run it officially, even if as a pacer. That's a very good thought...what if everybody did it. That certainly puts things in perspective. Just pay your money and run it, and if you can't qualify for it, that alone should give you a reason to work harder.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I think it's wrong. A bandit didn't pay for the space on the course, the aid at the aid stations, the police and emergency staff that have been arranged for the course, and the insurance to cover the event. I would be very frustrated to have to pass a bandit, or worse case scenario, be tripped up or otherwise hampered or slowed down by a bandit. I don't do many races a year, which means I train for months for a particular race and every second counts. Having said that, I love the idea of a generous race organizer specifically allowing people to run the course at the back of the pack. I'd have to think more whether I'd be okay with giving a pacer (who doesn't want a t-shirt/medal/timing chip) a discounted price for the race. If the race rules allowed pacers then maybe.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I really really think this is wrong. It makes me angry to think that someone just does it for fun while others have been training (and paying!) for this race. Confession: I've done it...but it was an accident! I was out on a training run and crossed a few paths with a half-marathon. I did NOT steal any of their gatoraide and signed up for it the following year

    ReplyDelete
  24. I think it is selfish to bandit a race, especially for a race that supports a charity. Races sometimes are crowded, run out of water and even medals. If you didn't sign up there are plenty of other places to run on that day.

    I can understand a parent running with a child that is registered but then shouldn't take anything from aid stations.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I think it's a fairly solid DICK-move.

    Obviously you are skimming from everything that's been established: security, road closures, permits, volunteers. Anyway you slice it, you're stealing resources.

    That being said, I'd like to see the numbers on what some of these marathons make for profit. 150 bucks is effing ridiculous.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I think organizers should consider giving discounts to pacers. Or allow folks to sign up as pacers (without charging the full fees...don't chip them or something).

    ReplyDelete
  27. ive never been a bandit, but on the note of celebrities doing what they want....I dont understand why celebrities get to run famous races (NY for exapmle) as their first marathon. others train hard and qualify for that coveted race but because of their name they get to hop on in...

    ReplyDelete
  28. I'd say half to three fourths of the races are on the route from my house to my weekly Sunday run. We sometimes join a race, but always stay to the side so there'll runners can go ahead. We never take from the aid stations although volunteers tell us okay. I don't think what we do is wrong. There is no way around our run unless we drive to another location. O. The other hand the marathon is going to happen Ina month and we are not running it but having an aid station for the slower runners

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm with Eisparklz...
    Where does pace-helper/moral-support fit into these rules?

    I've never bandited a race (in my mind), but I have certainly logged a couple of miles alongside friends who wanted company. I once ran more than 20 "hill repeats" (race up hill with friend for mile 12 of a very hilly half marathon. hit top. trot back down to encourage another friend. repeat.) I had paid for (and raced) the event's 5k beforehand. I drank none of the half-marathoners' water. I also paid dearly for my insanity (hard 5k + 20 half-mile hill repeats??? my butt hurt for DAYS!)

    But: I don't think of that as being a bandit.

    Maybe I'm wrong???
    ... I think I need a ruling here:
    Does that count as banditry???

    ReplyDelete
  30. hmmm...never thought about this. i was going to ask hubs to run me in on the last 5k of my marathon to get me through that brutal final bit...is that bad too? he would have run out just before the chute of course...i hope i don't need to castrate him?!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Anon: I totally agree w/you. I don't think that being on a run and "running" into a race constitutes banditry. I am still contemplating the "pacing" issue. Part of me says, no big deal, especially if it's not a charity run and you bring your own fuel. The other part of me thinks, what if every runner had a pacer who didn't register for the race (not that this would happen, but you get the point).

    ReplyDelete
  32. Maybe road racing needs clearer rules about pace buddies -- similar to what ultras have? Ultras are very clear that pacers are allowed/encouraged in many races (but often only for limited sections of the course).

    ReplyDelete
  33. Accidentally finding you're running through the course/as part of a race group when you go out for your regular run is no big deal. That's not banditry. There are frequent 5Ks out in our local city park, and if you run weekends, it would be almost impossible to avoid them all.

    If you deliberately bandit, at the very least, you're taking up space that should belong to legitimate, paid, registered runners, you're taking major advantage of all the volunteers and race organizers, and to boot, you're putting the race organizers in an awkward position insurance-wise if you have or, heaven forbid, cause an accident or injury. Not to mention the emergency workers/family members of other registered runners who may be trying to figure out which registered runner just took a tumble or got hit by a vehicle that didn't respect the closed course.

    That's best case scenario. You're being rude, inconsiderate and taking advantage of the people who are dedicating their time and energy to organizing the race and your fellow runners.

    These nice people probably got up at oh-dark-thirty to support and provide for registered, paid runners who are usually there, at least partly, to benefit charity.

    If I were hampered in my run, unable to quickly get water/snacks at one of the aid stations or got injured thanks to some jerk-face who decided to circumvent the rules for their own jollies and because they're cheap, I would be majorly ticked off. If you can't afford the fees, it's not like you're being forced to run in the race, you can take your run elsewhere for free.

    I would even say that a pacer should have the good manners and consideration to ask the organizers if pacing is allowed and not frowned upon. If not, stick to cheering and waving signs.

    Seriously, this guy should have known better.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I've never done it but did have a friend run miles 13-26 with me in a marathon. She ran with her own handheld and didn't partake in any aid stations. The race was plenty empty during these miles and she wasn't crowding anyone. I think it was a fine situation.

    However, having someone bandit the NYC or Boston marathon is different to me.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I think I did bandit a metric marathon in town here once, years ago, running alongside someone as a training run. Yikes--I'm on the board now and I hope they don't see this! It's really not cool when you get down to it. The only place where it's fairly accepted, of all places, is Boston. There's a pretty well-known history of bandits there, but they all know to start at the back of the charity runners. Interesting topic!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I've never bandit a race. I'm not planning on it either.

    I think the only time I would consider it, is to run a few miles with someone while they were running to complete a marathon.

    I haven't quite totally formulated my opinion on this topic, b/c I didn't really know anything about it before. But it's very interesting. Thank you for posting this. =)

    ReplyDelete
  37. Last month this dude I used to go to church with PROUDLY told me at the starting line of a half-mary that he was banditing. I was disgusted then, but I was REALLY peeved when he accepted a medal at the finish, and I was FURIOUS, I mean almost b*tch-slapped him, when he snatched up the last of the meager post-race food. Way to rep Jesus, man.

    ReplyDelete
  38. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  39. When I was in college in Boston, I knew countless folks who bandited the big one, The Boston, and I thought it was no big deal. I didn't appreciate, at the time, what other people go through to get into The Boston legitimately.
    Now that I run, and understand the process, I am not a fan of the bandit.
    And, I think it's a bit disingenuous to say, "well I didn't take aid from the aid station" ... of course the person would have if there was a medical emergency, right?

    ReplyDelete
  40. I'm too much of a goodie two shoes to be a bandit. I don't really care if people do though. I like the satisfaction of signing up for a race so that it keeps me motivated....

    xo
    Sarah
    Get Up & Go

    ReplyDelete
  41. I have to say at one point it never bothered me. But now that I think about it in terms of them being in our way, drinking our drinks etc. maybe it isn't all that acceptable. My husband has done a bandit only to pace someone and he NEVER took anything off of the course. He brought his own drinks etc and no medal. I haven't ever done it.

    ReplyDelete
  42. OMG I couldn't finish the post - my 17yo son just walked by and saw the pic and commented "you're looking at soft core erotica??" :)

    ReplyDelete
  43. I really don't get the big deal other than taking support off the course - like at aid stations. There is a local triathlon that Just Today it crossed my mind to bandit (as I tried for days to sign up but they couldn't get my foreign credit card accepted as payment and only took internet inscripciones) but I think it might be harder to bandit a triathlon than a running race. I love Peter Sagal but he shouldn't have taken aid station aid. Run, no problem.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I was all on board to say that I had never bandited a race but as I read through all the comments I realized I guess I did earlier this year. I signed up to run a 10 mile race but as a warm up and to get in some more miles for the day I ran the 5K prior to my event with my parents. I didn't stop at any aid stations (not even sure there were any for a 5K) and we were definitely at the back of the pack but maybe I should feel guilty about it?

    It's too bad that so many races are so expensive but I don't think it necessarily gives people the right to join in without paying. Either save up for another race or enjoy running just to run, don't race. If someone absolutely feels the need to bandit, they definitely shouldn't take up any of the resources provided to register runners nor should they cross the finish line and there is no excuse to do it in a race that had qualifying or fundraising standards.

    ReplyDelete
  45. My feeling on it is simple. It is something you are required to pay to get into, and you're not. It's stealing and lying. It's that simple and straight forward. People have a loose sense of morality nowadays.

    ReplyDelete
  46. a cross country team runs some of the 5k's around as bandits, bc they can't technically compete during season. so they are bandits and dont pay for the race or get awards, they just come and run.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I joined up with my sister on her first marathon for the last five miles to help motivate her (I didn't take any water etc... from the aid stations). At the time I didn't know any better. I had never run a race before. In fact, I was just beginning to run myself.

    Now, I see it as annoying. Large races are already crowded. You have to bob and weave and run in a pack. When you add more people in to the mix it is a nightmare. But common courtesy seems to be lacking in other areas as well as running. We could all stand to be reminded of the golden rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I am a rule-follower because I know that if I ever stepped out of line I would be arrested and summarily shot - so no, I'd probably never run in a race I haven't registered for.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I am sort of undecided. I agree that it is something that if one person does it, no big deal, but if everyone did it, it would be a mess. As far as a writer doing it, it doesn't bother me at all because in all likelihood, if he was important enough of a person, he probably would have been given free entry had he asked about it. Directors give out tons of free and discounted entries anyway. I have no shame in asking for a "coupon", and have gotten some good deals this way, and I am not anyone special. I do know a few people who put on races, so I do know that just because something is "sold out" doesn't mean they aren't going to add any extra people. I have never been a bandit, but I have had friends run bandit with me, or run with others to pace them. They never used the aid stations or took the awards. I do have one friend who ran Boston bandit, and wasn't planning on taking a medal, but someone just put one on her. She is super fast, too. I don't think I will ever do it, unless someone asks me to pace them. I was thinking about asking my one friend to come down and race as someone else (which I have done many times when race has been sold out), but she is so fast she might win, which may pose a problem too.

    ReplyDelete
  50. I didn't even know there was a term for this! I may have accidentally ended up in the middle of a race in my hometown because I didn't even know it was going on - but I certainly didn't run in it (this was before the word "race" was in my vocabulary).

    So, here's a question: I know someone who paced in the Big City marathon around here - I don't think she registered to run but she DID do a ton of volunteer work and contributed refreshments. She wouldn't be considered a bandit, right? I think you can't judge a runner by their bib, so to speak. But if you KNOW what you're doing is wrong and then you WRITE about it like you're some kind of hero? Yeah. You're an idiot. And should probably be burned at the finish line.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I've run bandit twice. Once in Nashville when we discovered all the streets were closed for a half marathon as we went out for our 18-miler. We caught up to the race and encouraged everyone we met from the back of the pack to the middle, pretty much acting as really enthusiastic cheerleaders. We didn't take any support, and when we got to the finish line we doubled back and kept cheering for people to complete our mileage. No guilt here.

    The second time was in the 2010 New York Marathon. My best runnning bud got in and I didn't. I put her on the ferry then met her in Brookyln and paced her until mile 25. I feel very guilty about this forray into banditry as I feel I got the experience of NYC without jumping through all of the appropriate hoops necessary to say I ran the world's largest race.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Kathy Lee Gifford bragged for a week on TV that she ran bandit style at Boston, I was ticked off at it, obviously she felt no remorse as she bragged about it for a week for sneaking in the Superbowl of Marathons.

    I have never bandit before, I am afraid of getting caught, what I am actually afraid of is being the "one that they set an example of" to deter others from running a race as a bandit

    ReplyDelete
  53. A friend of mine jumped in at mile 20 at the MCM last year, jumped off at mile 26. It was refreshing to see her, she had her own water (and for what is worth, had run the 10k that morning that followed the same course), and it was refreshing to see her, and helped me TREMENDOUSLY. This, I don't mind.

    Another friend of mine and his girlfriend didn't sign up for the MCM nor bought a bib online off Craigslist. They lined up, ran it, got the finisher's medal, etc etc. It's been a year and I'm still PISSED about it. That for me is the same as stealing.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I don't think people should do it. If they don't take advantage of he race support I think its not as big a deal.

    Most races are for good causes though and I think that if you want to be out there you should support the cause.

    ReplyDelete
  55. On the one hand, I am against banditing.

    On the other hand, Race Directors bring it upon themselves for inane policies around bib transfer. The technology exists to enable bib transfer up until the Expo closes and to say it doesn't is an outright lie.

    That being said, someone who runs on the course with no intention of ever registering should have their achilles sliced.

    As for pacing, I am OK pacing someone if you have registered for the race OR you only do it for two or three miles (assuming the race is a marathon or half marathon).

    ReplyDelete
  56. I think it depends on the event. If the culprit is running as a bandit on purpose because he wanted to experience the race but not pay the fees, then I'd certainly frown. But if it was part of a loop the runner was already planning on running that day (and he brings his own fuel) I don't think there's any harm in jumping in there. The way I see it, there's a set cost to roping off the streets, setting up detours, and having emergency crew on stand-by, regardless of how many entrants you have.

    ReplyDelete
  57. The bandit subject is certainly interesting. Even more interesting to me is: What's with all the cups/litter???!!! As a purebred trail runner, I always wear a Camelback. Out on trails, we need to carry "stuff". In the few longer races I've done, I've worn my small one. People may think it's geeky - whatever. I applaud cupless races. Seeing the photos of the thousands of cups strewn across the road is, well, disgusting. In our world where being "green" has become equal to morality, I think it's interesting that folks seem to conveniently turn their heads and look the other way in this regard. It is NOT hard to carry a small bottle and refill at aid stations or wear some sort of hydration system - once you train with it, wearing one or carrying a small bottle is a non-issue. I would LOVE to hear people's comments and possible excuses regarding their personal contribution to race litter. Just sayin'..... :-)

    ReplyDelete
  58. As a newbie to running, I view "banditry" as an insult to the sport.

    I'm a "play by the rules" kinda gal and most times won't take advantage of a situation.

    If I ever NEED to get a run in and there is a race going on, I'd just choose a different route.

    I can see why some feel it's NBD, since there is no real victim here. But that's there issue, not mine.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Banditry is completely unacceptable no matter the reason and this is why:

    What if that person gets hurt and it pulls medical services to them while a person who paid for the race gets hurt at the same time and doesn't get the help they need or expect because the medical staff is dealing with the bandit.

    Not even one bandit is acceptable in my mind because of this reason.

    ReplyDelete
  60. Now it has become done affordably for that UK residents to apply
    for cash loans till payday quick loans the big companies also defend themselves stating they need time for it
    to carry out surveys and contracts for rigs.

    ReplyDelete