Sunday, July 17, 2011

Nipple In the Middle

Right now I smell like an armpit that has been rolled in ass. At least Lucky’s not scared off by the stench. I think he rather likes it. Dogs are weird that way. He’s probably eat my poop if I let him.

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Today’s brick started bright an early. The plan was to ride for 2:45, but we were faster than expected and ended up with 44 miles in 2:35 with no stops. I’m getting GOOD at eating on the bike!

There was 1,500 feet of elevation gain, so definitely some hill work involved. I like the perfect nipple in the middle of this elevation chart. The white dips look like a pair of 80 year old boobs.

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The kids were just rolling out of bed when we walked in stripping off our helmets and lacing up our running shoes. I think they think we are crazy.  They’d rather eat Cinnamon Toast Crunch and watch Sponge Bob. Damn normal kids.

I really wanted to get in in an hour run so I could make this a 3:30 brick. When I get stuff in my head, it is very hard for me to NOT do it. About a mile in my left side (stress fracture side, eek!!) started feeling kind of wonky. Not major discomfort, just some slight pain in the hamstring and left butt cheek. But, this is the type of aching I had prior to my injury, so I don’t want to mess with it.

I played that internal game of, “Am I just being paranoid? How bad is this really? I’m sure I’m fine. No, wait. It’s not worth it. I should stop. Blah, blah.”

This is the very moment that separates a smart athlete from a dumb-as-shit-athlete (DASA).

I have fallen into the DASA category a few times. Pushed when I should not have. I am convinced that it is one of the most difficult challenges we face in our training when we need to back off due to potential injury, fatigue, overtraining, illness. Most of us runners and triathletes are not good at this. We think it makes us inherently weak if we don’t finish our workout or training hours for  the week. We think it means we will not perform well in our race.

Bullshit. Taking care of yourself makes you strong, not weak. It should be priority #1. There is nothing superhero about pushing when you shouldn’t. It  just makes you a DASA.

This doesn’t mean you don’t kick ass during your workouts and reach your limits. There is a time to push because that makes you stronger. But, you have to give your body time to adapt to what you are putting it through. Usually, this is in the form of recovery days. Stress your body, but then give it time to adapt. If not, you may run the risk of overtraining and being injured.

As I continued running, stuff swirled through my head. Crutches. Not being able to race. Crying. Pussy posse. Water running. No eff’ing way. Not going back there.

I stopped. I walked. I was pissed for a minute because I wanted the hour long run, and what I got was a 3 mile run and a .5 mile walk. But then I was proud of myself for knowing when to say when. It might not sound like a big deal, but this was HUGE for me. I am such an overachiever, I never cut myself a break. By the time I got home it was all good.

On top of all the biking and swimming, I ran 30 miles this week. I’m going to rest from running for a few days and focus on bike, swim and yoga.

That’s my wisdom for the day. Now I’m off to mail off all these babies:

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And, maybe to watch more of the crazy side-line people chasing the Tour de France riders. It’s one of the only time you get to see full naked butts on daytime TV:

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Do you pull back in your training when you need to? Do you always incorporate recovery weeks into your training? I have a recovery week every 3-4 weeks. I usually decrease my training volume by about 20%-30%.

Are you watching the Tour? I’ve been in and out of watching, but it is so motivating!!

SUAR

PS: I know you’ve got a special hidden talent (SHiT) to share. You could win a Shut Up and Run shirt! Check out my contest/giveaway HERE, or at least go read the comments, they are hilarious!!

35 comments:

  1. Freaking hilarious! And wise too :)

    I've had my moments of DASA but it's been because I've been really freaking lazy in the past and I really thought I was justifying quitting so I made myself push through it. You feel strong and like a badass until you realize you're down and injured and are going to miss two full weeks of training instead of 30 minutes today. Then you don't feel as smart.

    And as far as your no bare butts on daytime TV goes, you've obviously never seen any Latin Novelas ;)

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  2. Got a little anxious I read your hip was feeling wonky, so glad you stopped and took care of yourself!

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  3. I really needed this today. I have had a week of no running :( I was rear-ended on Tuesday and it messed me up. I tried to run and it hurt so badly that I stopped after 2 miles and realized I don't want to be a DASA. This reminder of yours is so helpful :)

    No TdF here… we are freaks with no t.v. reception.

    I think I have a couple SHiTs… I'll go put them over on that post.

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  4. DASA-love it! I had one of those moments just yesterday when I bagged my long run-frustrating, but when I got to the car, I was dang proud of myself. :)

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  5. ha ha love the old women boobs comment!!!

    I have been watching the Tour de France and it made me bike more this week!! My husband might even by a bike now and come ride with me :)

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  6. I'm a newbie runner (only on Week 4 of C25K), so I haven't gotten to that stressed out moment yet. Or the elation or the gotta do it moment either, but I'm working on it. I'll keep the over training tip in mind though if I ever get there. I watch the Tour because our Spin instructor patterns his rides after the stages on the Tour. I hate mountains.

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  7. As soon as you said you felt the pain in the spot of your old fracture I gasped. (yes, I gasped.) I struggle with the same thing, especially when it comes to running. Stopping makes you a pussy, right? Well it doesn't. Actually continuing and injuring myself and then being able to do sh*t makes me feel like a weak kid. So... I choose stopping now. :)
    And I totally watch the tour. The snapshot you took freaked me out on live television. I was like... NO. NO. Do the camera people see this? His banana hammock is falling down and I do NOT want to see what's under that thing.

    Ugh.
    Hope your hip feels better!

    -Steph

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  8. I'd also like to mention every time I am sneering, laughing or making a gross face by boyfriend asks me if I'm reading Shut Up and Run.

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  9. i am proud of you and i am sure your hip is too

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  10. Woohoo to you! I have been that DASA (ha ha) when I trained for my Half Ironman, then my first marathon, then my 2nd marathon resulting in a major IT band injury that sidelined me for months!! NO MORE!
    Good for you for knowing when to stop!

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  11. My hubby and I watch the TdF and I'll sit and swear and the dumb-asses running and chasing those cyclists while losing their briefs. Seriously. I would be freaking out at them. There's no way I'd be able to ride while having flags waved at me "running of the bulls" style. Retards!

    And good for you for toning it down a notch to avoid injury. That was smrt :)

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  12. I know jack squat about hardcore training but I think you did the right thing by really thinking it through and taking a little down time...your body was speaking at you!

    Have fun packaging up all those shirts!

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  13. I think it is really important to listen to your body and give it a break when it asks for one. When I think about all the demands I place on mine in terms of training it is easier for me to cut it some slack now and then. :)

    Wow you have got a lot of mailing to do!!

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  14. I started running a year ago last month and ended up with an overuse injury in Nov. I slowed down and bit and then continued to train through what was most likely a stress fracture in my hip in order to do the half marathon I had been training for. It was hurting by mile 6 but I kept running. At mile 11 something happend, I dont know what but it was not cute. So there I was injured at mile 11 of my 1st half. But did I stop? HELL NO! I was a DASA and just lept going, running and crying and unning and crying until I hit that finish line. And guess where it got me? In a lot of pain and I had to sit the bench and stop running for 3 MONTHS! All that hard work and then I had to stop running and loose all that strength and endurance I had built over tha past year. Oh well, live and learn. on the upside, I got that 13.1 sticked I'd been drooling over.

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  15. I agree with you that many runners and triathletes push too hard for too long, and injure themselves. I know a girl that ran herself into two stress fractures in her tibias. This baffles me. Do they not have any awareness of what their body is saying?

    You were very smart to bail on the workout. It's only a workout. Even if it really wasn't your old injury, so what? Something wasn't happy. Best to let it calm down.

    No, I'm not watching TdF. I believe that cable television turns your brain into tapioca pudding, ripe for exploitation by preachers, baggers, and the only slightly more savoury con artists like politicians, lawyers, and used care salesmen.

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  16. Good for you for taking care of yourself! : )

    I have been reading your blog for a while now and haven't commented yet but I love your posts! They're hilarious!

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  17. I use to not be as careful as I am now about backing off. It took an injury to get my attention. I'm not as superhuman as I once thought I was.

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  18. I now feel better about not running on my still-swollen-but-not-painful (TWSS!) ankle today. You know, because that Shut Up And Run Girl said not to be a DASA.

    -GR

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  19. It is really hard to come out of being DASA. I'm not sure I'm there yet, but I'm trying.

    We don't have TV so no TdF so we live stream Eurosport coverage. LOVE the commentary (dare I say?) better than Phil and Paul (dodges lightening bolt). Which means our rides are always during midday and full on heat time.

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  20. I had that same stupid stubborn conversation with myself this past week, like your athletic prowess depends on that ONE run/workout. DASA for sure. But, I have to say, being a person who used to do a whole lotta nuthin', I kind of get a rush from having those conversations inside my head now. I'm just glad I'm willing to push myself these days. But I sure would be sad to put myself back in "No Run Land" again. Good job backing off when you needed to.

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  21. Holy boob hills! You rocked a serious workout!!! And thank you for avoiding the DASA label. Don't need that tatted on your forehead.

    HiM here SUAR cums...er, comes!

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  22. Honestly, your post couldn't have come at a better time. I've been feeling so depressed about my training lately. I fell off the training wagon for two weeks straight because of my anemia. It kicked my butt hardcore.

    I ran two 5ks the past few weekends and didn't do nearly as well as I had hoped I would. I felt like I had taken two GIANT steps backwards in my training. But you're right, I need to give myself time to recover properly otherwise I'm going to do more harm than good. I don't want to be a DASA!

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  23. Way to be smart and stop. Not worth it. Getting injured is not the name of the game.

    I am so happy that you stopped b/c the race is around the corner and getting injured now would throw all your hardwork in the garbage.

    Stay smart.

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  24. I've been a DASA quite a few times. It really is hard because I always have the internal questioning game and stupidity usually won...been gettign a lot better at this after my last injury! Definitely harder but also definitely shows you are getting stronger.

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  25. Soon girly!! We will be there soon! Can't wait to see you kick my arse!

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  26. I'm faily certain my parents meant my middle name to be DASA. Very proud of you girl for listening and stepping back, it takes a lot of will to be able to do that!!

    Laying here being a lazy slug on a Monday morning watching some of the Tour. Boring day, no crashes or butts. I like more drama. Ha.

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  27. I always listen to my body at the first sign of a twinge. Better safe than sorry. Plus, it leaves me more time to do other things like drink a beer while everyone else is still running.

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  28. Good thing you stopped. But that pain you had in your butt and your hamstring sounds like what I dealt with while training for Boston. It was worse after speed sessions but finally got better once the race was over and I cut down the miles.
    I'd love to know what it is? Maybe it's something as simple as "bad form" when we get tired? We sag over our hips and let our shoulders drop, etc.?

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  29. I love the pic of Basso. One of the best looking-men out there! Oh and always listen if your body is hurting/injured!

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  30. Calling it quits on a workout is one of the hardest things to do, but you made the right call. I hope it feels 100% better after a little rest.

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  31. Can we just BUY shirts from you??? 3 of my friends and I read you blog and want to buy shirts to wear together for SF Marathon!.. :)

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  32. Does anyone know of an article or website listing what pains or discomfort you should NOT run through?

    I am new to running (running since Feb / just getting comfortable with running beyond 5K distances). On a week where I seriously overtrained (or, at least according to my beginner's standards), both of my knees felt very painful and uncomfortable when I went out for an easy run. I ran for about 2 minutes before stopping. That was about a month ago. I ice after running, have been going very slow and never more than 3 miles at a time, but the pain comes back, to a lesser degree, if I run two days in a row.

    I am heartbroken, because I have never committed to a fitness goal, and I am loving running and now that the spirit is willing, the body is failing. Tragedy! I really, really, really, really don't want to have to fully stop running for a few weeks.

    I have been doing toe touch one legged squats to strengthen my legs to prevent further injuries, but would love any advice from all you experienced folks.

    Just how much pain and what type of pain is okay to run through? I guess taking a few weeks off to rehab (if necessary) would be better than being a DASA and being sidelined for months...

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  33. Anon - great question. I will post it to Dr. San Millan who did my testing a couple weeks ago. I have heard that on the extreme, do not run if you have any pain. I have alos heard do not run if hte pain changes your gait/form. Not sure the correct answer, but since I've been injured I don't go if I have pain at all. Anyone else?

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  34. Dumb-as-shit-athlete (DASA) - love it! I shared this post with my running group. A lot of them are dealing with running-related injuries for the first-time ever and want to continue training hard even though, in my opinion, their bodies may be asking them to scale it back and take care of themselves! Love your perspective, your honesty and humor. Thanks for another great post!

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  35. I am so behind on commenting, but had to say something about that first line... my husband and I have a little competition thinking of different words for all our levels of stink... and armpit rolled in ass is a top notch description... definitely adding that to my ammo. ;-)

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